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Annual Campus Security Report & Annual Fire Report

2017 Annual Campus Security Report and Annual Fire Report

South Dakota State University

Message from Tim Heaton, Chief of University Police

Welcome Jackrabbits!

You have made a great choice to come to South Dakota State University. The University Police Department provides many services to the university community. Department contact and other valuable information is available on the University Police Department website. The safety of our community is an obligation we share with the rest of the university community. A safe community requires the engagement and active participation of all members of the community. The University Police Department works to create a strong partnership with the community to create an inviting and safe community.

Contained in this page is the university Annual Safety Report (ASR). For the sake of convenience and simplicity we have combined the ASR and the Fire Safety Report into a single document. This document provides information so members of the community can make informed decision about their own safety. Additionally, the ASR provides statistical information about crimes occurring on SDSU Clery geography, educational programs and other resources and information regarding the rights and responsibilities for both victims of crimes and those accused of committing crimes. Information is provided on the reporting of crimes, to include confidential reporting’s, and victims’ rights and responsibilities. I hope you find this information valuable!

Tim Heaton
Chief of the University Police Department

Emergency Contacts:
UPD: 111 from campus phone
UPD: 605-688-5117
Brookings PD: 911

Jackrabbit Guardian App

South Dakota State University

Annual Security Report Review Committee for 2016 Calendar Year

Dr. Sam Jennings II, Chair
Dean of Students

Timothy Heaton
Chief – SDSU Police Department

Dr. Michelle Johnson
Title IX/EEO Coordinator

Crime Report Statistics and Definitions

The blank areas represent a change in the required reporting (such as Forcible Sex Offences now reported as Rape and Fondling). The correct data is reported under the appropriate year and crime category: Rape, Fondling, Incest, Statutory Rape, Forcible Sex Offenses, and Non-Forcible Sex Offenses.

The blank areas represent years when reporting VAWA crimes in this format was not requested. Reporting VAWA crimes began for crimes occurring in 2014: Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, and Stalking.

CRIME REPORTS

2014

2015

2016

MURDER & NONNEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER

 

 

 

On campus

0

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

0

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

0

NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER

 

 

 

On campus

0

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

0

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

0

RAPE

 

 

 

On campus

 

4

6

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

4

7

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

1

FONDLING

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

4

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

4

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

INCEST

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

STATUTORY RAPE

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

FORCIBLE SEX OFFENSES

 

 

 

On campus

4

 

 

Non-Campus building or property

0

 

 

Residential Facilities for Students

3

 

 

Adjacent Public Property

0

 

 

Unfounded reports in this category

2

 

 

NON-FORCIBLE SEX OFFENSES

 

 

 

On campus

0

 

 

Non-Campus building or property

0

 

 

Residential Facilities for Students

0

 

 

Adjacent Public Property

0

 

 

Unfounded reports in this category

0

 

 

ROBBERY

 

 

 

On campus

0

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

0

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

0

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT

 

 

 

On campus

1

1

1

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

1

1

1

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

0

BURGLARY

 

 

 

On campus

4

5

3

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

2

4

3

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

0

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT

 

 

 

On campus

1

1

2

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

0

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

1

ARSON

 

 

 

On campus

1

0

3

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

0

0

3

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

0

DATING VIOLENCE

 

 

 

On Campus

2

5

4

Non-Campus building or property

0

1

0

Residential Facilities for Students

2

4

4

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

0

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

 

 

 

On Campus

0

3

2

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

0

3

2

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

0

STALKING

 

 

 

On Campus

3

3

4

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

1

3

2

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

0

0

0

CAVEAT: 2016 Incidents of Arson involved one individual lighting door decorations on fire.

 

CRIME REPORTS

2014

2015

2016

Minimal damage each instance, approximate estimate of overall damage is less than $20.
HATE CRIMES
2014: Two total hate crimes: one hate crime of larceny; one hate crime of vandalism characterized by race

 

 

Blank areas in Hate Crimes represent an institutional decision to list Hate Crimes rather than include them in the Caveat. This is a change for the 2016 Annual Security Report reflecting 2015 crime data.

HATE CRIME REPORTS (previously stated in caveat)

2014

2015

2016

MURDER & NONNEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

RAPE

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

FONDLING

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

INCEST

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

STATUTORY RAPE

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

ROBBERY

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

BURGLARY

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

 

0

0

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

ARSON

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

LARCENY-THEFT

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

SIMPLE ASSAULT

 

 

 

On campus

 

0

1

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

1

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

INTIMIDATION

 

 

 

 

 

0

4

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

2

Adjacent Public Property

 

1

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

DESTRUCTION/DAMAGE/VANDALISM OF PROPERTY

 

 

 

On campus

 

2

0

Non-Campus building or property

 

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

 

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

 

0

0

Unfounded reports in this category

 

0

0

 

HATE CRIME REPORTS (previously stated in caveat)

2014

2015

2016

  • One simple assault, ethnicity bias
  • Four intimidation, two ethnicity bias, three gender bias (one case was both ethnicity and gender)

HATE CRIMES 2015:

  • One simple assault, sexual orientation bias
  • Two vandalism, one sexual orientation bias, one religion bias.

CRIMINAL ARRESTS

2014

2015

2016

LIQUOR LAW VIOLATIONS

 

 

 

On Campus

105

223

175

Non-Campus building or property

5

10

20

Residential Facilities for Students

89

108

92

Adjacent Public Property

23

8

44

DRUG LAW VIOLATIONS

 

 

 

On Campus

40

54

44

Non-Campus building or property

2

4

5

Residential Facilities for Students

33

14

26

Adjacent Public Property

4

9

2

WEAPONS LAW VIOLATIONS

 

 

 

On Campus

0

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

0

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

 

   

DISCIPLINARY REFERRALS TO CAMPUS JUDICIAL SYSTEM

2014

2015

2016

LIQUOR LAW VIOLATIONS

 

 

 

On Campus

423

324

302

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

392

294

282

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

1

DRUG LAW VIOLATIONS

 

 

 

On Campus

1

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

1

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

WEAPONS LAW VIOLATIONS

 

 

 

On Campus

0

0

0

Non-Campus building or property

0

0

0

Residential Facilities for Students

0

0

0

Adjacent Public Property

0

0

0

Definitions of Crimes which are included as University policy violations in the Student Code of Conduct:

Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter is the willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.

Negligent Manslaughter is the killing of another person through gross negligence.

A sex offense (Forcible) is any sexual act directed against another person, without consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.

Fondling: The touching of the private parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable if giving consent because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.

Consent as defined in University policy 4:5 is as follows:

Consent may be implied from the facts and circumstances surrounding the commission of an act. Consent will not be found where an act has been done through the use of force, coercion, or threats of immediate and great bodily harm. Submission does not equal consent, and to establish consent, a party must utterly negate any element of force, coercion, or threat. Consent, once given, may be retracted. Consent will not be found under any of the following circumstances:

  • If the victim is less than thirteen (13) years of age; or
  • Through the use of force, coercion, or threats of immediate and great bodily harm against the victim or other persons within the victim’s presence, accompanied by apparent power of execution; or
  • If the victim is incapable, because of physical or mental incapacity, of giving consent to such act; or
  • If the victim is incapable of giving consent because of any intoxicating, narcotic, or anesthetic agent or hypnosis; or
  • If the victim is thirteen (13) years of age, but less than sixteen (16) years of age, and the perpetrator is at least three (3) years older than the victim.

Incest is non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degree where marriage is prohibited by law.

Statutory Rape is non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

Robbery is defined as the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, and control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Aggravated assaults are defined as an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose in inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually involves a weapon or means likely to cause death or great bodily harm.

Burglary is defined as the unlawful entry into a structure to commit a felony, a theft, to vandalize or trespass, or with the intent to commit a felony, a theft, to vandalize, or to trespass.

Arson is maliciously burning or causing to be destroyed by burning any public or private property.

Motor vehicle theft is defined as the theft or attempted theft of a motorized vehicle. (This classification also includes “joyriding”).

Hate crimes are defined for this report as crimes committed against a person who manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim’s actual or perceived race, gender, gender identity, religion, ethnicity and national origin, disability, or sexual orientation. For this report, the hate crime must have been for one of the following criminal offenses that was committed where the victim was intentionally selected because one of the above listed biases motivated the perpetrator. These crimes are murder and non-negligent manslaughter, forcible sex offenses, non-forcible sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/ damage/ vandalism to property.

Liquor law violations are defined as violations of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, possession, transporting, or furnishing of intoxicating liquors or alcoholic beverages; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. (Public intoxication and driving under the influence are not included).

Drug abuse violations are defined as violations of State and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, and use, growing or manufacturing and making of narcotic drugs.

Weapons possession violations are defined as violations of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as: manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons; carrying of deadly weapons, concealed or openly; furnishing deadly weapons to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons and all attempts to commit any of these acts.

Dating Violence means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

  • The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party's statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
  • For the purposes of this definition,
    • Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.
    • Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence (See SDSU Policy 4:5 in Appendix B).

Domestic violence includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim by a person;

  • With whom the victim shares a child in common; or
  • Who is cohabitating with or who has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; or
  • Similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or
  • By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s act under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred (See SDSU Policy 4:5 in Appendix B).

 

South Dakota Codified Law chapter 25-10 is the local statute covering domestic violence.

25-10-1. Definitions. Terms used in this chapter mean:

(1) "Domestic abuse," physical harm, bodily injury, or attempts to cause physical harm or bodily injury, or the infliction of fear of imminent physical harm or bodily injury between family or household members. Any violation of § 25-10-13 or chapter 22-19A or any crime of violence as defined in subdivision 22-1-2(9) constitutes domestic abuse if the underlying criminal act is committed between family or household members;

(2) "Family or household members," spouses, former spouses, or persons related by consanguinity, adoption, or law, persons living in the same household, persons who have lived together, or persons who have had a child together;

(3) "Protection order," an order restraining any family or household member from committing any act of domestic abuse or an order excluding any family or household member from the dwelling or residence of another family or household member, whether or not the dwelling or residence is shared. A protection order has a duration of five years or less; and

(4) "Temporary protection order," an order restraining any family or household member from committing any act of domestic abuse or an order excluding any family or household member from the dwelling or residence of another family or household member, whether or not the dwelling or residence is shared. A temporary protection order has a duration of thirty days except as provided in § 25-10-7.1.

 

Stalking is the engagement in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to; or

  • fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others
  • suffer substantial emotional stress

 

Course of conduct means two or more acts, including but not limited to, acts which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens or communicates to or a bout, a person, or interferes with a person’s property.

Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.

Substantial emotional distress means significant anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

 

South Dakota Codified Law 22-19A is the local statute covering stalking.

22-19A-1. Stalking as a misdemeanor--Second offense a felony. No person may:

(1) Willfully, maliciously, and repeatedly follow or harass another person;

(2) Make a credible threat to another person with the intent to place that person in reasonable fear of death or great bodily injury; or

(3) Willfully, maliciously, and repeatedly harass another person by means of any verbal, electronic, digital media, mechanical, telegraphic, or written communication.

A violation of this section constitutes the crime of stalking. Stalking is a Class 1 misdemeanor. However, any second or subsequent conviction occurring within ten years of a prior conviction under this section is a Class 6 felony (See SDSU Policy 4:5 in Appendix B).

 

  • Annual Security Report
  • Introduction to the Annual Security Report

In 1991, the U.S. Congress passed the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act, which requires colleges to report the three previous years of statistics on murder, sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, and motor vehicle theft, and statistics on arrests for drug and alcohol violations, arson and weapons violations. In October 1998, President Clinton signed an amendment renaming the act the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act and required that all crimes motivated by hate or bias be included in the statistics. On March 7, 2013, President Obama signed a bill that strengthened and reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act. Included in the bill was the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (Campus SaVE), which amends the Jeanne Clery Act and affords additional rights to campus victims of sexual violence, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. (http://clerycenter.org/article/vawa-reauthorization) All published Clery related information is maintained by the Office of Student Affairs.

South Dakota State University (SDSU) recognizes the importance for an institution of higher learning to develop and maintain a safe and secure environment in which the academic and social pursuits of its members can be fully realized. No community's security plan can attain maximum effectiveness unless everyone contributes to making it work. Safety and security are both personal as well as shared responsibilities. Only by accepting this responsibility can members of the University community maintain a safe and secure academic environment.

Established in 1881, what we know now as South Dakota State University began as South Dakota State College as a land-grant institution. Since then, the University has grown to offer 183 fields of study in nine colleges. Our undergraduate and graduate students, well over 12,000 in all, learn to succeed in classes led by dedicated professors. Hands-on research projects with nationally respected professors, internships that bring coursework to life, and choices from over 200 student organizations ensure that there is something for everyone.

  • SDSU Geography

The main SDSU campus is located in Brookings South Dakota and is approximately bordered by Highway 14 Bypass on the North, 22nd Avenue on the east, sixth street on the south and 10th avenue on the west. Approximately 4,000 students live on campus and the campus sees at least double that in students and employees during a traditional day in the academic year.

Clery requires the reporting of crimes that occur in three types of locations, on campus property, on campus student housing facilities which are a subset of on campus; public property which is defined as all public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the campus or immediately adjacent to accessible from the campus; and non-public property which is any property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution, or any building or property owned or controlled by the an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institutions educational purpose, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.

  • Campus Security Authorities (CSA)

Any University official acting in an advisory capacity to students or student organizations has the duty to report alleged Clery crimes to the University Police Department. These officials are referred to as Campus Safety Authorities. The list of CSA’s can be found in Appendix A.

When a Campus Security Authority (CSA) becomes aware of a Clery Act incident, he or she must report the incident to the UPD.

  1. A CSA may become aware of a Clery Act incident by receiving a report of conduct that constitutes a Clery Act incident, witnessing an incident, or being made aware of allegations of an incident.

 

  1. A CSA must report the incident unless he or she reasonably believes the report or allegation was not made in good faith. “Good faith” does not mean that the CSA should attempt to make a determination as to whether there is adequate evidence of a crime or whether the alleged incident in fact occurred. Instead, it means that the information is not mere rumor, and that there is little or no reason to doubt the validity of the information.

 

  1. The reporting obligation arises when the CSA becomes aware of information or allegations of conduct or behavior that reasonably appears to constitutes a Clery Act incident; the CSA may not wait for criminal charges to be brought, arrests to be made, or determinations of guilt to be made.

 

  1. The CSA must report even if the information regarding the incident was shared with him or her in confidence (confidentially).

 

  1. Reporting can be done by phone or in person at the University Police Department located at 1305 Jackrabbit Avenue.

 

  1. To ensure that this reporting occurs, CSA receive e-mails reminding them of their obligations as a CSA and which crimes are to be reported as well as a request for information on Clery crimes known by the CSA.

 

  • Local Law Enforcement Agencies

 

Working Relationship with State and Local Police

Crime prevention and the apprehension of those who commit crimes on the SDSU campus are the UPD’s primary goals. To achieve these goals, UPD works closely with surrounding law enforcement agencies, specifically the Brookings Police Department and the Brookings County Sheriff’s Department. The University does not have an agreement with other jurisdictions for investigation of alleged criminal offenses.

Monitoring and Recording through State and Local Police

Through established relationships with local law enforcement agencies UPD monitors and records criminal activity at off-campus locations. This includes officially recognized student organizations with off-campus housing and non-campus instructional sites.

 

Reporting at non-campus locations

SDSU also reports crime occurring at non-campus locations through local police departments in those communities. The following is a list of non-campus instructional sites for 2015.

Name of Location

Address

Aberdeen Nursing Program

1200 S. Jay Street, Aberdeen, SD 57401

Capital University Center

925 E. Sioux Ave, Pierre, SD

Gillette, WY

525 W. Lakeway Rd, Gillette, WY

SDPURC (University Center)

4801 N Career Avenue, Sioux Falls, SD (north) 2205 N Career Avenue, Sioux Falls, SD (south)

Watertown

Watertown High School, 200 9th St NE

West River Graduate Center

515 West Blvd., Rapid City, SD

West River Nursing Program Site

1011 11th St., Rapid City, SD

University Center – Rapid City

4300 Cheyenne Blvd., Rapid City, SD 57709

Crossroads Hotel and Huron Event Center

100 4th Street SW, Huron, SD 57350

Rapid City DHS

2330 N Maple Street # 2, Rapid City, SD 57701

South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

501 E St Joseph Street, Rapid City, SD 57701

Enemy Swim Day School

13252 446th Ave, Waubay, SD 57273

Faith Public High School

206 W 5th Street, Faith, SD 57626

Lake Area Tech

1201 Arrow Ave NE, Watertown, SD 57201

Mitchell Technical Institute

1800 E Spruce Street, Mitchell, SD 57301

SDSU Extension Center - Rapid City

1530 Samco Road, Rapid City, SD 57702

SDSU Extension Center - Sioux Falls

2001 E. Eight Street, Sioux Falls, SD 57103

Sioux Falls Convention Center

1101 N West Avenue, Sioux Falls, SD 57104

University Center-Sioux Falls

4801 N Career Avenue, Sioux Falls, SD 57107

Brookings Airport

413 2nd Avenue Brookings, SD

Brookings High School

530 Elm Avenue Brookings, SD

Brookings to Broadway

418 Main Avenue Brookings, SD

Seed Technology

2380 Research Parkway Brookings, SD 

Research Building

2301 Research Parkway Brookings, SD

NCARL Tech Transfer

2923 Medary Avenue, Brookings, SD

Swiftel Center

824 32nd Avenue Brookings, SD

This information is gathered by Registrar’s Office annually.

  • Reporting Crime and Daily Crime Log

Crime Reporting Policy, Procedures and Responses

A victim of or a witness to a crime has the opportunity to report crime and is encouraged to do so. If a crime occurs on the SDSU campus, it should be reported immediately to the University Police. The UPD has primary jurisdiction over the University campus. In addition to the UPD, crimes may also be reported to a designated Campus Security Authority. A list of Campus Security Authorities (CSA) is located in Appendix A. This list is also available on the SDSU website and provides names, titles, location and phone numbers of the designated officials and is updated by the CRRC in collaboration with Human Resources.

All criminal actions and emergencies reported to the UPD will receive immediate attention and will be investigated to determine possible legal charges.

Non-emergency Reporting Procedures

For non-emergency assistance, please call the UPD at 605-688-5117. The UPD is located at 1305 Jackrabbit Avenue. While students are encouraged to report crimes to the police, other University staff such as the Vice President of Students Affairs Office or the Counseling Center staff will also provide assistance with reporting crimes on or near campus.  Residential students also can report crimes and concerns to their respective residence hall staff members.

Confidential Reporting of Crime

For victims of a crime, reporting of the crime is voluntary. Those who choose not to pursue action with the SDSU Student Conduct system or the criminal justice system, may want to consider making a confidential report. If a complainant request confidentiality or asks that the complaint not be pursued, the University will take all reasonable steps to investigate and respond to the complaint consistent with the request for confidentiality or request not to pursue the investigation. Upon request of the victim, UPD can file a report documenting the incident and reporting details only to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator. The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with the desire to keep information confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of SDSU students and staff. With such information, SDSU can keep accurate records of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger.

Reports can also be filed anonymously with the Brookings Area Crime Stoppers. Brookings Police Department coordinates with UPD on crimes reported to them. Crimes can be reported to Crime Stoppers by calling 605-692-STOP (7867).

  • Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures

Campus Emergency Notification

Consistent with the requirements of the Clery Act SDSU provides two types of alerts to the university community. They are timely warning and emergency notification. Timely warnings provide information on Clery Act crimes and other criminal activity that poses a threat to the community. Emergency notifications notifies the community upon confirmation, without hesitation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of a member of the community. Both timely warnings and an emergency notifications are designed to provide the necessary information to make informed decisions about safety. Both timely warnings and emergency notifications will be delivered campus wide.

The annual law enforcement request for statistical information asks police departments with Clery reportable property in their jurisdiction to notify the university should a crime(s) occur that puts the university community at risk.

Information regarding incidents that meet the criteria for an emergency notification will be sent by the University Police Department or the Chair of the Emergency Management Team or designee without delay as soon as the threat is confirmed, unless issuing of the notification will, in the professional judgement of university authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. Threats will be confirmed through reports from law enforcement, fire official, students, employee and general public relayed information indicating the event is authentic.  Emergency notification will utilize e-mail, telephone, desktop notification, university home web page and university controlled social media.

Registration for the University Emergency Communication System, Everbridge is located at http://www.everbridge.com. Through this registration process you can provide additional information that will allow you to receive emergency communications through your cell or landline phone or text.

It is the policy of SDSU to respond immediately to emergencies in a manner consistent with the university Emergency Management Plan. Events that warrant a timely warnings or emergency notifications will be sent campus wide. All-clear messages will be sent when the condition requiring the emergency notification has ended.

Social media, university controlled web pages and releases to the media will provide emergency information and updates to the general community.

The University conducts tests of the emergency notification system early in the fall and spring semesters. To increase participation and registration in the emergency notification system, the fall test notification test is announced. Information on how to access the system, register and provide additional information is provided in the announcement. The spring test is unannounced. 

Fire drills are conducted in all on-campus academic and residential facilities. Fire drills are conducted in residential facilities semi-annually, in the fall and spring semesters while academic buildings drills are conducted annually. Drills are conducted with and without notice. Working with staff from the Office of Facilities and Services, and Residential Life and Housing fire drills are coordinated by the university Emergency Management Specialist. Drills are evaluated for compliance with evacuation procedures and fire system operations. Results are documented by the University Emergency Management Specialist and shared with Building Wardens and Residential Life and Housing staff. These results include a description of the exercise, time, date, location, whether the drill was announced or not and for compliance with procedures. Building Wardens and Residential Life and Housing Staff are responsible for disseminating the report to building occupants and addressing a deficiencies identified in the report. University emergency response and evacuation procedures are described in the university emergency management plan. The plan is available on the Safety and Security web page

 

Emergency Procedures

Crimes in progress should be reported immediately by dialing 1-1-1 using landline phone on the SDSU campus, dialing 605-688-5117 from a cell phone for the UPD, or 911 for the Brookings Police Department. Whenever possible, the victim or witness of the crime should call the police directly as firsthand information is always more accurate and complete. There are Emergency Phones located throughout the campus linked directly to the UPD. The UPD is staffed 24-hours a day, 365 days a year. When calling to report a crime or incident, please be ready to give information such as:

  • A brief description of what occurred
  • Where the incident occurred
  • When the incident occurred
  • Did the suspect(s) have a weapon
  • When and where was the suspect last seen
  • Description of the suspect (gender, age, height, weight, hair color, clothing, facial hair, tattoos or other relevant information)

Campus Crime Alerts – Timely Warning

Timely warnings provide information on Clery Act crimes and other criminal activity that poses a threat to the community. A timely warning is issued by the Chair of the Emergency Management Team (refer to University policy, “Community Notification of Potential, Imminent or Active Threat to the University” number 10.3 reproduced in Appendix C), or designee upon consultation with the University Police and other departments. This information is provided to the community via campus wide email and posting on the University home webpage.

Additionally, the University will provide other notification to the community of incidents that do not meet the criteria for a timely warning or emergency notification, but contain important safety and security related information. These notifications are provided by the Chair of the Emergency Management Team, or designee in consultation with other University departments. Such notifications will use email, web pages or other methods as determined by the university.

It is the policy of South Dakota State University to complete publicly available recordkeeping, including Clery act reporting and disclosures without inclusion of the victim or accused individual’s personally identifying information.

Community members who know of a crime or other serious incident should report that incident as soon as possible to the UPD 605-688-5117 or 5117 on campus) so that a timely warning or emergency notification can be issued, if warranted. Typically, the SDSU Emergency Communications System is tested the first week of the fall and spring academic semesters. These tests will be announced in advance of the test. By Board of Regents Policy all student and staff emails are automatically entered into the Emergency Communications System. Test announcements will provide information on the Emergency Communications System and provides information and instruction on adding additional contact information into the system.

 

  • Policy Statements

 

  • Information Collection and Preparation of Annual Report

SDSU has the responsibility of gathering statistics, identifying reportable crimes, and reporting/publishing these statistics to the Department of Education and the SDSU community. The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act requires certain crime statistics to be reported when they occur on campus property, public property on or adjacent to the SDSU campus and non-campus property, as well as student disciplinary referrals and arrests for drugs, alcohol, and weapons offenses. The Act also requires collection of information regarding crimes from non-law enforcement “campus security authorities” who have “significant responsibility for students or campus activities.” The current Campus Security Report is compiled for the previous calendar year from statistics based upon crime reports provided by the South Dakota State University Police Department (UPD), incident reports received from “campus security authorities,” as well as off-site police departments where SDSU courses are offered, and SDSU disciplinary referrals occur.

 

The following guidelines are utilized in developing the statistical disclosure for the report:

  • SDSU will report crimes for liquor, drug and weapons violations occurring on campus, in student housing facilities, at non-campus buildings owned or controlled by SDSU, and on public property adjacent to the campus.

 

  • The Office of Student Conduct tracks disciplinary referrals for drug, alcohol and weapons violations. As well as other Clery reportable crimes that were not reported to the UPD.

 

  • When there are two crimes associated with one incident, the UPD Records Officer will be relied upon to determine which crime should be used for reporting purposes. The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Hierarchy Rule will be used to make this determination. The exception is with VAWA crimes which will be reported in addition to other crimes in one incident.

 

  • SDSU complies with the State of South Dakota laws and Board of Regents policies regarding alcohol and other drug use. Students, participating in unapproved alcohol-related events, will be documented through SDSU Student Conduct system. Students of legal age of consumption will not be included in the Clery Reporting Statistics for disciplinary referrals for possession or consumption of alcohol. Clery reporting requirements include only violations of the state liquor law.

 

  • To ensure accurate documentation of all criminal and disciplinary incidents connected with SDSU criminal case files will be maintained in the University Police Department and disciplinary records will be maintained by the Office of Student Conduct.

 

  • All members of the SDSU community are encouraged to report any crime promptly and accurately to the UPD for on-campus crimes and to local law enforcement when crimes occur of campus. Victims of crimes and third-party observers to crime may report crimes anonymously. Any person who is aware of a reportable offense and is aware the victim is unable to report is encouraged to make a report on their behalf.

 

  • Licensed counselor, when acting in their capacity as a counselor are exempt from reporting requirements. SDSU encourages counselors, if and when they deem appropriate, to inform those they counsel of procedures for reporting crimes on a voluntary, confidential basis for inclusion in the Campus Security Report.

 

  • When aware that a crime has been committed, non-law enforcement “campus security authorities” will forward the information to the UPD. To the degree possible, these reports will be treated as confidential unless the victim gives permission to document identifying information or for police to investigate. The information will also be forwarded to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator, for review or investigation, and to ensure that interim measures and remedies are provided. Reporting forms include the request for specific information (e.g. date, location, nature of the offense). This information is used to preserve confidentiality, avoid duplicate or inaccurate statistical reporting, and assure that the incidents are, as much as possible, congruent with the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting classifications.

 

  • A designated University official in or with a supervisory relationship to the University Police Department will communicate with the relevant law enforcement agencies at all off-campus instructional sites as identified by the Department of Education. The sites are specified in section 3 below. Data provided from the police departments from these areas will be included in the “Off Campus” category in the SDSU Campus Security Report.

 

  • SDSU does not condone or support the illegal possession, consumption, or distribution of alcohol at off-campus events sponsored by recognized student organizations. Individuals who violate SDSU alcohol regulations at off-campus events are subject to sanctions described below. Organizations that sponsor events where violations occur are subject to student conduct action, including loss of recognition.

In addition to the above guidelines, all UPD officers are required to classify incidents according to South Dakota Codified Law (SDCL) as well as Clery criteria. The University Police Department has also designated the UPD Administrative Sergeant as the Records Officer for the purposes of maintaining department and institutional compliance with the Clery Act. The duties for this position shall include but are not limited to:

  • reviewing officer reports for proper UCR, South Dakota Codified Law (SDCL) and Clery classification;
  • monitoring of the Daily Crime Log (DCL) to ensure timely reporting;
  • collecting data for the Clery annual report;
  • training all new UPD employees (full time, part-time and student staff) on the Clery regulations;
  • conducting continuous training for UPD officers and dispatchers (full time, part-time and student staff) on accurate reporting and classification of all crimes, updates to the Clery Act, and information regarding access to the DCL; and,
  • serving as the department’s representative on the Clery Reporting Review Committee.

The University’s Clery Reporting Review Committee (CRRC) is responsible for meeting all compliance and other requirements for the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). This committee, reports to the Vice President for Student Affairs. The CRRC provides the leadership to ensure full compliance in the areas of reporting, implementing policies and procedures, updating the annual reporting list and providing educational programs. The committee membership is listed on page two of this document.

The CRRC meets a minimum of three times each year in February, June and August. The February meeting is designed to review updates to the law, discuss and identify off-campus instructional sites, review policies and procedures connected to the Clery Act, and gather initial data for the Annual Security Report from the UPD and the Office of Student Conduct. The June meeting will be held to update various policies (e.g. Crime Reporting, Emergency and Non-emergency procedures, and Security of Facilities), identify programming efforts (e.g. Campus Crime Procedures, Crime Prevention, Drug and Alcohol-Abuse education), begin reviewing crime and disciplinary data to avoid duplication of the same incident, and review communication efforts with non-campus law enforcement agencies. The August meeting will be utilized to finalize the data elements for the ASR, make any final policy updates, and confirm revised procedures for distributing of the ASR.

Distribution of the Crime Statistics Report

Email messages are sent to all SDSU students, faculty and staff on or prior to October 1 annually informing them of the posting of the ASR. The message will direct these individuals to the specific SDSU website for this information. Hard copies will be available through the UPD Communication Center, upon request.

  • Security of Campus Facilities

Access and maintenance of campus buildings

SDSU is a large campus, situated on 272 acres. During the school year, the daily population of several thousand students, staff, and faculty makes the University a small city in itself. The nature of the study, service, and research conducted at SDSU requires that many of our buildings and facilities be open and accessible 24 hours a day. Since the campus is open, many individuals find it easy to access the buildings and grounds; a few may engage in criminal activity. So, regardless of the time of day or night, no matter where people are on campus, they should be alert and aware of their surroundings and exercise common-sense safety precautions. Buildings, facilities and landscaping are maintained in a manner that minimizes hazardous conditions. UPD officers regularly patrol the campus and report malfunctioning lights or other unsafe physical conditions to facilities management authorities for correction. In addition, SDSU invites reports of physical hazards through the work order process for situations such as a broken light, cracked sidewalk or overgrown shrubs. Concerns can be reported at the Facilities and Services work order using this link. A charge account number is not required when reporting a safety concern.
 
Security considerations used in maintenance

 

Non-Residential Buildings

Our campus has more than 300 buildings comprising almost 3.6 million square feet. Although almost all of these buildings can be accessed by key after business hours, many are locked after 5 pm. It is essential that staff, faculty, and students cooperate to keep closed facilities locked. Prevent unauthorized individuals from entering campus buildings by not propping doors open, leaving doors unlocked if you enter after hours, or opening the door for individuals you do not know. In addition, protect the security of campus keys, and immediately report the loss or theft of keys.

Residential Buildings

SDSU provides housing for more than 4,200 students in traditional residence halls, apartments, and in family designated housing. UPD and Housing and Residential Life staff work closely together to create a safe and comfortable living and learning environment. The security of residential areas involves on-duty residence hall staff, apartment managers, and round-the-clock UPD patrols. Campus-wide security and safety discussions are held for residents throughout the year to increase awareness of crime risks and improve campus safety.

Residence hall students must also take an active role to ensure their own security by exercising common sense and by learning and following security procedures. In addition, since the campus is open, and visitors to residence halls and apartments are reasonably restricted and monitored, residents need to be alert and aware of their surroundings. Residents are responsible for the behavior of their guests. Visitors must be escorted by a member of the residential facility at all times. To maintain the safety and security of residence halls, residents and visitors must ensure that locked buildings stay closed and locked. Residents are strongly encouraged to keep their room or apartment door locked, always carry and protect their keys or swipe card and immediately report should either be lost or stolen. In addition, residents should not open entrance doors for people they do not know and should alert residence hall staff and UPD attempts at unauthorized entry (for example, someone climbing in a window) or suspicious activity (an unknown person walking out of a friend’s room carrying a computer).

Residents are reminded to carry provided keys and student identification when leaving their room since residential areas remain secure 24 hours per day. Tampering with and/or propping entry doors endangers residents’ safety, personal property, and University property.
 

Doors are locked as listed below:

Exterior Entrance Doors:

  • All on-campus residential facilities require card authorization to gain entry. These facilities are: Abbott, Ben Reifel, Binnewies, Brown, Caldwell, Hansen, Honors, Hyde, Mathews, Meadows North, Meadows South, Pierson, Schultz, Spencer, Thorne, Waneta, and Young. The card swipe access system uses SDSU ID cards to give residents of a specific hall access to their building, as well as others authorized to enter a building.

 

  • All exterior entrance doors (lobby, fire tower, etc.) are locked 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with the following exceptions:

 

  • lobby doors in Caldwell Hall are unlocked from 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. during regular business days to access University Housing & Residential Life offices.

 

  • lobby doors in Hansen Hall are unlocked from 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. on regular class days for access to the classrooms located in the lower level and a convenience store located in the main entrance lounge.

 

  • lobby doors in Honors Hall are unlocked from 8:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m. on regular class days for access to the classroom and Honors College offices located on the main level.

Internal Doors:

A. Floor and elevator doors may be locked daily and reopened as determined by University Housing and/or hall communities.

B. Designated “fire emergency only” stair tower doors remain locked 24 hours a day and are only to be used during an emergency evacuation.

 

  • Security Awareness Services

Daily Log

Federal law requires that every university that "maintains a police or security department of any kind shall make, keep, and maintain a daily log, written in a form that can be easily understood, recording all crimes reported to such police or security department," including the nature, date, time, general location, and disposition of the complaint, if known. The UPD Records Officer is responsible for ensuring the crime log is accurately and completely updated regularly during the work week and is made readily available to the campus community and general public upon request. Paper crime logs are available at the University Police Department. On-line versions are available at the Office of Safety and Security web-site.

The law requires that this initial information be open for public inspection within two business days of the report of the crime unless the release of the information is prohibited by law and/or if the disclosure would jeopardize the confidentiality of the victim. It also requires that new information about entries be made available within two business days. All crimes reported to the UPD are included in this log. If a specific day is not listed, then no crimes were reported on that day. The disposition of the crime is "case open, investigation continuing with available information" unless indicated otherwise in the entry.

Enforcement and Arrest Authority

SDSU’s police officers are duly sworn and certified law enforcement officials, having the same authority under the law as municipal police officers. University Police Officers have the authority to make arrest on University property and public property where adjacent to University property. UPD employs 14 certified police officers and approximately 12 student officers. The part-time student officers serve in a security capacity by locking doors, providing vehicular and foot patrols to monitor for unsafe situations and relay information to police officers and monitoring student safety during campus events. Police officers patrol the campus 24 hours a day, 365 days a year enforcing applicable local, state and federal laws; arrest violators; investigate and suppress crime; investigate traffic and bicycle accidents; and provide a range of police related services, including immediate response to all medical and fire emergencies.

Information on Registered Sex Offenders

The State of South Dakota (SDCL 22-24B) requires those people convicted of a sex offense to register with the local law enforcement agency of the community in which they reside. In addition, sex offenders must notify law enforcement if they change residences.

SDCL also requires the court to inform the person charged with a sex offense of their requirement to register. The Department of Corrections is also required to inform inmates under their control of the registration requirement. The State makes this information available to local law enforcement agencies. This information regarding registered sex offenders in South Dakota is available via the Internet at: http://sor.sd.gov/default.aspx?c=search with the national database available at http://www.nsopw.gov/en/Registry

Please note that not all sex offenders who may be attending or employed at SDSU reside in Brookings or Brookings County. Be sure to indicate to the local law enforcement agency you contact that you are a current student, a prospective student, or an employee at SDSU and that you want to review the sex offender registries. The law enforcement personnel at the following locations will respond by directing you to the current information:

University Police Department

1305 Jackrabbit Avenue

605-688-5117

Brookings Police Department

307 Third Avenue

605-692-2113

Brookings County Sheriff

315 Seventh Avenue

605-696-8300

Any person who uses information containing in or accessed through the South Dakota Sex Offender Registry to threaten, intimidate, or harass any individual including registrants or family members, or who otherwise misuses this information, may be subject to criminal prosecution. A violation is a Class 6 felony and the violator could be sentenced to the South Dakota State Penitentiary for up to two years and could be fined up to $4,000. If you believe that any of the information found in these records is in error, or you would like additional information, please contact the sheriff of the county or the chief of police of the city where the sex offender resides.

 

  • Drug Free Environment
  1. Purpose
    • This policy and its procedures implement SDBOR Policies 4:27 and 3:4 and set forth the policies governing possession, use, or distribution of alcohol, marijuana, or controlled substances on University property.
    • The University is committed to providing a drug free workplace. In compliance with the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the South Dakota Drug Free Workplace Policy the University strictly proscribes the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of controlled substances by its employees and agents while on duty or while in any workplace controlled by the University. For purposes of this proscription, the workplace shall include premises and vehicles owned and controlled by the University and other premises and vehicles when used for educational research, service, or other official University functions.
      • Any person violating this proscription shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary actions, which may include termination of employment or expulsion from the University and SDBOR institutions.
      • Additional regulations may be found in SDBOR Policy 4:14.2(F). It is the intent of the SDBOR that all employees regardless of their faculty, exempt, or civil service status be subject to the policies set out in those provisions. Employees are also subject to applicable federal and state laws.
    • Each person employed by the University to render services under a federal grant or pursuant to a federal contract will, as a condition of that employment, agree to (1) abide by the terms of this policy, and (2) to notify their Supervisor, or the University President, of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace, that notice being submitted no later than five (5) days after such conviction.
      • The Supervisor, University President, or appropriate designees, shall have primary responsibility for the implementation of the foregoing policy.
      • Each University employee who is assigned to perform services under a federal grant or pursuant to a federal contract shall be given a copy of the University’s drug free environment policy.
      • Whenever the University receives actual notice that an employee rendering services under a federal grant or contract has been convicted of a criminal drug statute violation that occurred in the workplace, the University President, or designee, shall notify the appropriate federal agency within ten (10) days after receipt of such notice.
      • Within thirty (30) days of receipt of the notice specified in paragraph (iii), the University shall (1) take appropriate personnel action against the employee, up to and including termination, and (2) in the event that the personnel action stops short of termination, require such employee, at his or her own expense, to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program approved for such purposes by an appropriate agency.
    • In compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, the University strictly prohibits the unlawful possession, use, manufacture, or distribution of alcohol, marijuana or controlled substances by its students or employees while on University controlled property or while participating in any capacity in activities or employments sponsored by it.
      • Students are subject to the provisions set forth by federal and state law and all SDBOR and University policies, including SDBOR Policy 3:4 and the University Student Code.
    • No possession, use, manufacture, or distribution of alcohol, marijuana, or controlled substances is permitted on premises controlled by the University, except:
      • When needed in conjunction with approved research activities;
      • When alcohol is possessed, used, or distributed in a lawful manner inside a dwelling occupied by an employee who, as a condition of employment, is required to maintain a residence on premises controlled by the University;
      • When alcohol is possessed, used or distributed in a lawful manner inside a designated residence hall facility occupied exclusively by upper-division and/or non-traditional students who are at least twenty-one (21) years of age;
      • When the possession, use, or distribution of the controlled substance is incidental treatment by a licensed health care professional authorized to prescribe such substances; and
      • When alcohol is possessed, used or distributed in a lawful manner on University property designated by the University President as places where such possession, use and distribution may be permitted, subject to the conditions prescribed.
    • The University has designated a limited number of sites on campus where lawful alcohol possession and consumption may be permitted as part of a University sponsored event or activity, upon University approval. Those designated sites include the following locations:
      • Football tailgate areas (pursuant to University Football Tailgating Policy)
      • Roberts Reception Hall in the Performing Arts Center
      • University Student Union
      • Peterson Recital Hall in Lincoln Music Hall
      • McCrory Gardens
      • South Dakota Art Museum
      • Agricultural Heritage Museum

 

The University President may designate additional sites on campus where the lawful alcohol possession and consumption is permitted, subject to the restrictions of this and other University and SDBOR policies and procedures, and a properly issued Permit.

 

  • Approved alcohol use will be limited to wine and beer. Only individual serving-sized cans of beer will be permitted under this policy. No kegs or other large containers of beer may be used on campus. Mixed drinks and liquor will not be permitted.
  • University individuals or groups requesting permission to serve alcohol on campus are prohibited from advertising the availability of alcohol use on campus.
  • Whenever an officially recognized organization is permitted under this policy to conduct a social function at which alcohol will be provided, it must adhere to the following guidelines:
    • If the function includes the sale of alcoholic beverages, appropriate permits and licenses must be obtained;
    • The organization sponsoring the event should implement precautionary measures to ensure that alcoholic beverages are not accessible or served to persons under the legal drinking age or to persons who appear intoxicated;
    • Persons of legal age must be designated as servers. They must be trained to monitor alcohol consumption, and they alone may have direct access to alcoholic beverages.
    • Attractive nonalcoholic beverages must be equally available and on display.
    • The consumption of alcoholic beverages must be limited to the area designated for the event.
    • A reasonable portion of the budget for the event must be designated for the purchase of food items, and food must be available throughout the event.
      1. Officially recognized student organizations remain subject to the additional restrictions set forth in the Student Code which prohibit expenditure of organizational funds for alcoholic beverages.
    • Alcohol service must be discontinued well before the event is expected to end.
    • Alcohol use should never be the primary focus of the event. Drinking contests and other activities that encourage consumption of alcohol are strictly prohibited.
    • Advertising may not mention the availability of alcohol in a prominent way, nor may advertising mention the amount of alcoholic beverages available. If mention is made, equal attention must be given to the availability of nonalcoholic beverages.
    • Officially recognized organizations will have the responsibility to provide those persons conducting the event with copies of these regulations. They will also be responsible for implementing these regulations.
    • Officially recognized organizations must agree to abide by the foregoing regulations as a condition of continued recognition.
  • Persons who violate the provisions of this policy will be disciplined.
    • Students will be subject to discipline as set forth in the Student Code. The Student Code sets forth additional policies governing student possession, use, or distribution of alcohol, marijuana, or controlled substances.
    • Disciplinary procedures for employees will vary according to the individual’s status as a Civil Service employee, as a non-faculty exempt employee, as a faculty member who is excluded from the bargaining unit, or as a faculty member who is within the bargaining unit. Disciplinary measures shall be imposed pursuant to those procedures that are appropriate to the employee’s classification.
    • Employees whose unlawful possession, use, or distribution of alcohol, marijuana, or controlled substances violates this policy may be subject to those disciplinary measures set out in SDBOR Policy 4:14, except that absent extraordinary circumstances, a second infraction will be deemed just cause for termination.
    • Where the infraction is a violation under South Dakota or federal law, the essential facts of the infraction may be referred to law enforcement authorities. Consistent with South Dakota law, where the infraction constitutes a felony, essential facts of the incident will be referred to law enforcement authorities. Investigation by law enforcement will not require suspension of disciplinary proceedings nor delay imposition of discipline.
  • The University is responsible for preparing and distributing annually to all students and employees written statements that set forth in detail the following:
    • SDBOR and/or University policies that regulate the possession, use, or distribution of alcohol, marijuana, or controlled substances, together with the relevant disciplinary procedures and sanctions;
    • Legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law for the unlawful possession, manufacture, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol;
    • Health risks associated with the use of alcohol, marijuana, or controlled substances; and
    • Any available programs for alcohol, marijuana, or controlled substances counseling, treatment, rehabilitation, or re-entry.
  • The University is required to report, on a biennial basis:
    • Evidence about the degree to which its alcohol, marijuana, and controlled substances programs have been effective in reducing academic, social, and employment problems associated with the use of such substances;
    • Any changes in University or SDBOR policies that might enhance program effectiveness; and
    • Data showing what disciplinary measures were imposed on students or employees pursuant to the foregoing policies.
      1. The data provided in response should contain sufficient detail to demonstrate that sanctions were imposed consistently and equitably among those students and employees who became subject to discipline.
    • The University reserves the right to approve or deny requests for alcohol use without sale at its sole discretion. Sales of Alcoholic Beverages on University Property are subject to review and discretionary approval under University Policy 6:4.
      • Groups or individuals wishing to obtain authorization for Alcoholic Beverage possession or consumption without sale in accordance with this policy must submit a fully completed Alcoholic Beverage Non-Sale Permit Application with the reservation or facility use agreement for review and routing through the applicable facility use reservation process to the University President.
      • A fully completed Alcoholic Beverage Non-Sale Permit Application and all required documents, including a facility reservation or facility use agreement, security plans, and any other requested information must be delivered to the Office of the University President through the applicable facility use reservation process at least ten (10) business days prior to the proposed event. The University President, or designee, may request additional information to inform the President’s determination.
      • The University President will review the application, required documents, internal unit approvals, and have correspondence transmitted approving or disapproving the Alcoholic Beverage Non-Sale Permit Application to the applicant. The University President may require additional review of facility use reservations, facility use agreements, security plans, food and Alcoholic Beverage contracts, and other supporting information and documentation by other University officials to inform the President’s decision whether to approve or deny an application.
        1. If the application is not approved, the University President will indicate the reason for the disapproval.
        2. If the application is approved, the University President will approve a Permit for the event.
      • If Permit is approved, it will be displayed at the Permitted Event at point of service.

The University has designated the following residential locations for legal alcohol consumption as follows:

  1. Hansen Hall in rooms where the resident(s) are of legal drinking age (21 years of age) provided that no one under aged 21 is present while alcohol is being consumed.
  2. Meadows apartments in apartments where the resident(s) are of legal drinking age (21 years of age) provided that no one under aged 21 is present while alcohol is being consumed.
  3. Residence Hall Director apartments provided that no one under aged 21 is present while alcohol is being consumed.

 

  • Education, Awareness and Prevention

Definition of Terms

Programs to prevent: The term programs to prevent refers to comprehensive educational and training programs intended to prevent violence that incorporate diverse approaches that are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and consider risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, community and societal levels.

Primary prevention: The term primary prevention refers to programming, initiatives and strategies intended to stop domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking before it occurs to prevent initial perpetration or victimization through the promotion of positive and healthy behaviors and beliefs. Efforts to change behavior and social norms, and promote healthy relationships, healthy sexuality and egalitarian gender roles, or efforts to understand risk factors and protective factors for bystander inaction and change social norms around bystander inaction are all examples of primary prevention.

Awareness programs: The term awareness programs refers to programs, campaigns, or initiatives that increase audience knowledge of the issues of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking and share information and resources to prevent interpersonal violence, promote safety, and reduce perpetration. These efforts can include campus communitywide mobilizations as well as targeted audience-specific programming (including both students and employees). Awareness month campaigns, “Speak Outs,” rallies or marches, informational poster campaigns or resource websites, and educational programming that focus on sharing resources and information about these issues are examples of awareness programs.

Bystander intervention: The term bystander intervention refers to safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene in situations of potential harm when there is a risk of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking against a person other than the individual. Effective bystander intervention training prepares participants to recognize situations of potential harm, overcome barriers to intervening, identify safe and effective intervention options, and take action.

Risk reduction: The term risk reduction refers to approaches that seek to mitigate risk factors that may increase the likelihood of perpetration, victimization, or bystander inaction. Risk reduction focuses on helping individuals and communities address the institutional structures or cultural conditions that facilitate SV, DV & stalking to increase safety. Examples of risk reduction may include but are not limited to general crime prevention education, campus escort programs, programs that educate on how to create individual and community safety plans and strategies, and bystander intervention programs that educate the campus on how to recognize and interrupt situations of harm, or implementing a communications system that can notify the entire campus community of immediate threats to security.

Ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns: The term ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns refers to campaigns that are sustained over time focusing on increasing awareness or understanding of topics relevant to SA, DV and stalking prevention. These programs will occur at different levels throughout the institution (i.e., faculty, athletics, and incoming students) and will utilize a range of strategies. Ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns may include information about what constitutes sexual assault, dating violence/intimate partner abuse, and stalking, changing social norms, promoting recognition of perpetrator tactics, enhancing understanding of consent, and advancing prosocial behaviors of individuals and communities. Effective ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns will include developmentally appropriate content for the specific audience and their knowledge and awareness level and provide positive and concrete ways for individuals to get involved.

 

Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and Stalking Policy and Programs

Procedures Survivors Should Follow

SDSU is committed to providing a safe environment for all students, employees, and guests. University Police, Administration, and others are working to prevent crime and violence on campus. SDSU has specific policies prohibiting sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. If any of these occur, the University stands ready to fully investigate any such reports and provide counseling, safety and support options and disciplinary information for the Complainant, and Respondent, while protecting the privacy and dignity of all involved. In addition, SDSU personnel will offer assistance to all individuals with contacting law enforcement officials. In addition, SDSU personnel will offer assistance to all individuals with contacting University and other law enforcement officials. The University understands and communicates to victims that they have the option of reporting or not reporting an incident to law enforcement.

Whether the incident occurred off campus or on students or employees who report to SDSU that they have been a victim of one of the aforementioned crimes shall be provided with a written explanation of the student or employee’s rights and options. Individuals involved in a Title IX/EEO investigation will be provided with written notifications about options for, and available assistance in financial aid and international student services along with changing academic, living, transportation and working situations, if requested by the complainant or accused and if and such accommodations are reasonably available, regardless of whether or not the complainant chooses to report the crime to campus police or local law enforcement.

Sex offenses include the subjection of another person to any sexual act against that person’s will, without one’s consent, whether forcible or non-forcible. It may be coerced through force or threats of force or with someone who is unconscious, or someone who is incapable of giving consent. The University treats both sexual assault and rape as extreme forms of harassment. Student Conduct sanctions for harassment can range from a minimum of behavioral probation to a maximum of expulsion. For more information regarding the SDSU Student Code, see http://www.sdstate.edu/StudentCode. Employee sanctions can range from remedial measures to termination.

 

Campus-Wide Training Program

Purpose

Campus-wide training is provided to students and employees to ensure an environment free of harassment or discrimination. It is important that all campus community members have an awareness of the ways in which Title IX and Equal Opportunity impacts everyone on our campus.

Training Components

Online Training for all employees & students

During the summer 2015, the South Dakota Board of Regents (SDBOR) contracted with LawRoom Company, in an effort to standardize Title IX training provided to all SDBOR students and employees to initiate a succession of Title IX training courses. In total, 991 students and 3076 employees completed the training. LawRoom Company offers a variety of training programs, so that training can target given audiences and additional trainings can be offered throughout the year. SDSU initiated the LawRoom training in September 2015.

After the initial training session, employees will be required to repeat or complete additional online refresher training a minimum of annually or as legislation requires. The Title IX/EEO Coordinator will be responsible for selecting the materials, but they should evolve as applicable laws and policies are revised. Each training session will remind individuals of the current contact information of the Title IX/EEO Coordinator and designated deputies at SDSU. It is important to note that this online training applies to all employees, including leadership personnel.

On-site Training – Appeal Boards

SDBOR hosted Margolis-Healy, who presented in-depth Title IX review and investigation training for individuals who conduct Title IX investigations and related hearings. In addition, the Margolis-Healy presenters provided instruction on victim centered interviewing. The training was held on July 7th and 8th, 2016, and a total of 6 SDSU employees completed the training. On August 25th and 26th, 2016, SDBOR held an alternate training day for individuals who were not able to the Margolis-Healy training; three SDSU employees completed the training.

Training Schedule / Long Term Plan:

Following the initial LawRoom training sessions, individuals who investigate Title IX complaints will be required to complete Title IX related training at a minimum of annually or as legislation requires, to ensure they stay knowledgeable about the process and to keep up-to-date with changes to applicable University policies, state and federal laws.

Title IX/EEO Coordinators & Deputy Coordinators

Title IX/EEO Coordinator, Title IX Investigators and Deputy Coordinators will be required to complete Title IX related training to enhance their understanding of Title IX/EEO and how to investigate complaints and conduct disciplinary hearings in a manner that protects the safety of the victim and promotes accessibility. In addition, these employees will be required to complete online or in-person recertification training biennially. The Title IX/EEO Coordinator and Deputy Coordinators will maintain proof of their Title IX/EEO Investigator Certification.

 

Title IX/EEO Training Content

The following information is included in the undergraduate version of CampusClarity:

  1. Sex in College- What is hooking up and the systematic problems of doing so
  2. Healthy Relationships- Good relationships, relationship violence, domestic violence and stalking, related SDSU policies
  3. Party Smart- Being safe, recognizing alcohol poisoning, sexual assault, getting help
  4. Sexual Violence- Defining sexual violence, SDSU sexual assault policy, consent, coercion, bystander intervention, survivor reactions, helping a friend, Title IX, SDSU hearing process, interim measures, retaliation and sexual harassment

The following information is included in the graduate version of CampusClarity:

  • Sexual Assault Statistics
  • Foundations- Cultural barriers, key concepts, legal protections, barriers to reporting, social responsibility
  • Personal Life- Sexual harassment, concerning behavior, relationships in grad school, understanding sexual harassment, determining sexual harassment, unwelcome sexual conduct, hostile environment, relationships in school, sexual misconduct policy
  • Professional Life- Stalking, sexual violence, good verses bad relationships, abusive relationships, helping a friend, domestic violence, stalking and cyber-stalking, consent, sexual assault, barriers to consent, survivor reactions, aftermath of sexual assault, rape myths
  • Taking Action- Recognizing strengths, anticipating rationalizations, intervention approaches, conduct proceedings, interim measures

The following information is included in the employee LawRoom on-line training:

  • Title IX:
    • Discrimination and Harassment
    • Understanding Sexual Harassment
    • Quid Pro Quo
    • Sexual Harassment Can Occur Anywhere
    • Definition and Components of a Hostile Environment
    • Campus SaVE Act
  • Crimes and Conduct Violations:
    • Sexual Assault, Who’s at Risk
    • Understanding Sexual Assault
    • Definition of Consent and Sexual Offenses
    • Relationship Violence
    • Definition of Domestic Violence and Stalking
    •  
    • How to Help Students- How to Talk to Survivors
    • Why is Sexual Assault Underreported- Barriers to Reporting
    • Mandatory Reporters
    • Interim Measures
    • Importance of Preserving Evidence
    • Institutional Response- Conduct Procedures
    •  
  • Making a Difference:
    • Bystander Intervention
    • How to Intervene
    • Ending Sexual Misconduct

Communication Strategy

The communication strategy supports the institutional training objectives and provides action items for the communication of the campus-wide Title IX/EEO training over the next 12 months. This plan serves as a guideline for all internal and external communication for all SDSU employees and students.

This communication strategy focuses on educating our employees, students, and volunteers on the importance of this training program and demonstrates SDSU’s commitment to campus-wide compliance training.

Key Messages of Communication

SDSU initiated a campus-wide Title IX/EEO training to comply with federal requirements.

This training will educate campus community members on what Title IX/EEO is and how it impacts our campus. In addition to all aspects of Title IX/EEO, this training includes statistical data related to campus safety, instructions on how to respond and how to report concerns, bystander intervention information and ways to maintain a respectful environment. Training is required for all employees and strongly encouraged for all students.

Training Protocols

SDSU is committed to providing appropriate training to ensure the safety of everyone on campus. Title IX/EEO training will be offered and strongly recommended, as appropriate, to all members of the campus community. The objectives and the method of the training will vary depending on an individual’s role in the campus community. The Title IX/EEO Coordinator will be responsible for training coordination, training content as well as the management of training records.

Students

All students at SDSU are strongly encouraged to complete online training that raises awareness on both Title IX and Equal Opportunity. The training content not only provides general information, but also directs the students on whom to contact with any concerns.

Student participation is recorded via LawRoom so that the training record may be managed by the Title IX/EEO Coordinator.

Students will be provided access to a brochure that contains references to applicable University policies and resources available on campus and in the Brookings community to assist victims of sexual harassment sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking. The brochure will also contain the current contact information, including name, physical address, telephone number, and email address, for the Title IX/EEO Coordinator. This information will also be made available on the SDSU Title IX/EEO website.

Faculty and Staff

All SDSU faculty and staff, including student employees, will be required to complete online training that raises awareness on both Title IX and Equal Opportunity concerns. The training content not only provides general information, but also identifies whom to contact with any concerns. New faculty and staff will complete the training within 30 days of employment, under the direction of the Title IX/EEO Coordinator. The onboarding process will not be considered complete until the faculty or staff member has completed the training.

Existing SDSU employees will be required to complete the online training program. Similar to the students, this will be achieved by emailing a link to the training session. Individuals will use their credentials to sign in to the session so that the training record may be managed by the Title IX/EEO Coordinator.

Employees will be provided with access to a brochure that contains references to applicable University policies and resources available on campus and in the Brookings community to assist victims of sexual harassment and sexual violence. The brochure will also contain the current contact information, including name, physical address, telephone number, and email address, for the Title IX/EEO Coordinator and designated deputies at SDSU. This information will also be made available on the SDSU Title IX/EEO website.

After the initial training session, faculty and staff will be required to repeat or complete additional online refresher training a minimum of one time per year. The Title IX/EEO Coordinator will be responsible for selecting the materials, but they should evolve as applicable laws and policies are revised. Each training session will remind individuals of the current contact information of the Title IX/EEO Coordinator and designated deputies at SDSU.

Leadership, Committees & University Police

In addition to the online training for faculty and staff, those who are in a leadership role at SDSU will also be required to participate in training to review Title IX, Equal Opportunity and University policies. Because individuals in a supervisory role are often the first to learn of harassment concerns, they must receive more in-depth training that enables them to respond effectively. Individuals required to receive this training are as follows: President, Provost, Vice Presidents, Deans, Directors, Supervisors, University Police Department personnel, Student Conduct Committee, Academic Appeals Committee, Title IX/EEO Coordinator, Deputies and Advisory Committee. Training will also be provided to various other roles that involve a great deal of student contact or support or roles that are involved in the process as defined by the Title IX/EEO Coordinator. These individuals will be required to complete this level of training at a minimum of every other year, or based on federal regulation, to ensure they stay knowledgeable about the process and to keep up-to-date with changes to applicable University policies, state and federal laws.

Title IX/EEO Coordinator and Deputies

In addition to the online training for faculty and staff and the training for leadership and committees, the Title IX/EEO Coordinator and designated deputies will be required to attend training seminars to increase their understanding of Title IX/EEO and to ensure the University is acting in compliance with guidelines applicable to Title IX/EEO. The Title IX/EEO Coordinator will be responsible for overseeing and, in certain situations, conducting the training sessions on campus, including the online training.

It is the responsibility of the Title IX/EEO Coordinator to manage and record the training attendance for all members of the campus community and to ensure that members are provided with the brochure containing resources and contact information for Title IX/EEO personnel.

Finally, the Title IX/EEO Coordinator and deputies will be required to complete recertification training every other year, beginning in 2015. The Title IX/EEO Coordinator and deputies will maintain proof of their Investigator Certification.

Investigative Process Flow Chat

 

 

Inquiry, Allegation, Report or Complaint

Intake

 

Anyone may bring forth concerns to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator.

 

Any inquiries will be responded to and/or investigated.

 

 

 

Title IX/EEO Coordinator

Michelle Johnson, Ed.D., Title IX/EEO Coordinator & Affirmative Action Officer

Phone: 605-688-4128

Michelle.Johnson@sdstate.edu

 

 

Informal or Formal Resolution

 

Timeline

Intake………………………………………………………………Complaint or Inquiry Received

Day 1…………………………………………………………………………………………………..Assignment

Day 3……………………………………………………………………………..Assessment Discussion

  Day 3…………………………………………….…Interim Measures Meeting, if applicable

Day 3……………………………………………………………Response or Investigation begins

Day 15………………………………………………………………………………..….Review Discussion

  Day 20…...Investigative Report Complete & Outcome Notifications Sent

 

Must reach out to the Complainant within

 5 business days to discuss their concern.

 

To appeal a recommended a “reasonable basis to proceed” finding, individuals may petition the President within 15 business days for a review of the investigative file.

 

 

Review Discussion

with Title IX /EEO Coordinator

 

Finding or                 No Finding

Assignment to                      Title IX/EEO Deputy Coordinator

Assessment Discussion

 

Response or Investigation

 

Determine Interim Measures

 

If the Concern is Out of Title IX/EEO Scope

Referral will occur

 

Inquiry, Allegation, Report or Complaint

Intake

 

Anyone may bring forth concerns to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator.

 

Any inquiries will be responded to and/or investigated.

 

 

 

Title IX/EEO Coordinator

Michelle Johnson, Ed.D., Title IX/EEO Coordinator & Affirmative Action Officer

Phone: 605-688-4128

Michelle.Johnson@sdstate.edu

 

 

Informal or Formal Resolution

 

Timeline

Intake………………………………………………………………Complaint or Inquiry Received

Day 1…………………………………………………………………………………………………..Assignment

Day 3……………………………………………………………………………..Assessment Discussion

  Day 3…………………………………………….…Interim Measures Meeting, if applicable

Day 3……………………………………………………………Response or Investigation begins

Day 15………………………………………………………………………………..….Review Discussion

  Day 20…...Investigative Report Complete & Outcome Notifications Sent

 

Must reach out to the Complainant within

 5 business days to discuss their concern.

 

To appeal a recommended a “reasonable basis to proceed” finding, individuals may petition the President within 15 business days for a review of the investigative file.

 

 

Review Discussion

with Title IX /EEO Coordinator

 

Finding or                 No Finding

Assignment to                      Title IX/EEO Deputy Coordinator

Assessment Discussion

 

Response or Investigation

 

Determine Interim Measures

 

If the Concern is Out of Title IX/EEO Scope

Referral will occur

 

i

 

Inquiry, Allegation, Report or Complaint

Intake

 

Anyone may bring forth concerns to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator.

 

Any inquiries will be responded to and/or investigated.

 

 

 

Title IX/EEO Coordinator

Michelle Johnson, Ed.D., Title IX/EEO Coordinator & Affirmative Action Officer

Phone: 605-688-4128

Michelle.Johnson@sdstate.edu

 

 

Informal or Formal Resolution

 

Timeline

Intake………………………………………………………………Complaint or Inquiry Received

Day 1…………………………………………………………………………………………………..Assignment

Day 3……………………………………………………………………………..Assessment Discussion

  Day 3…………………………………………….…Interim Measures Meeting, if applicable

Day 3……………………………………………………………Response or Investigation begins

Day 15………………………………………………………………………………..….Review Discussion

  Day 20…...Investigative Report Complete & Outcome Notifications Sent

 

Must reach out to the Complainant within

 5 business days to discuss their concern.

 

To appeal a recommended a “reasonable basis to proceed” finding, individuals may petition the President within 15 business days for a review of the investigative file.

 

 

Review Discussion

with Title IX /EEO Coordinator

 

Finding or                 No Finding

Assignment to                      Title IX/EEO Deputy Coordinator

Assessment Discussion

 

Response or Investigation

 

Determine Interim Measures

 

If the Concern is Out of Title IX/EEO Scope

Referral will occur

 

 

Investigative Process

All inquiries, allegations, reports, or complaints relating to discriminatory conduct, harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking will be forwarded to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator for response or investigation. Upon receipt of inquiries, allegations, reports, or complaints relating to harassing or discriminatory conduct, or sexual violence, the Title IX/EEO Coordinator will respond or investigate.

  • Intake Process - Upon receipt of inquiries, allegations, reports, or complaints, that information must be immediately communicated to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator for proper entry into the Case Management System (CMS). This communication should occur within one business day of the inquiry, allegation, report or complaint.
  • Forms – Upon intake, complete the Intake Form. See matrix below for other forms that need to be distributed.

 

Title IX/EO Rights, Options and Responsibilities

What Witnesses Need to Know

Complainant

X

 

Respondent

X

 

Witness(es)

 

X

  • Assignment – The Title IX/EEO Coordinator will assign the case to a Deputy Title IX Coordinator, and enter that information into the CMS. The Title IX/EEO Coordinator may also choose to proceed independently with the case.
  • Immediately following assignment, the Title IX/EEO Coordinator will facilitate an Assessment Discussion with the assigned Deputy. The Assessment Discussion will identify and document the following items clearly:
  • Confirmation that the case aligns with the scope of Title IX and/or EEO policies.
  • If the case is not within the Title IX/EEO scope, the Title IX/EEO Coordinator will communicate that to the complainant and/or refer as appropriate. This will then be documented within the CMS.
  • Identify applicable policies and provide clear notice of these procedures to the individuals involved.
  • Establishment of required timelines of the response or investigation. The following dates will be identified within the CMS at this time. See Investigative Intake Form.
    • Date of inquiry, allegation, report or complaint.
    • Five -business day timeframe to communicate with, and interview, the complainant. This step represents the minimum response.
    • Within 15 business days following the Deputy’s interview with the complainant, a Review Discussion will occur between the Title IX/EEO Coordinator and Deputy.
    • day timeframe to complete the investigation.
    • Document any delay in this timeline and the reasons for the delay(s). Investigations may not exceed 20 business days unless agreed upon by the parties involved and/or by the Title IX/EEO Coordinator.
  • Identifying the individuals to be interviewed within the scope of the investigation.
    • These individuals may be directly involved or indirectly involved in the complaint.
  • Identify appropriate questions to be asked of each individual.
  • Response or Investigation process ensues.
  • Record all significant dates / interview dates of the investigation.
  • Log the receipt of information, evidence, and other materials as obtained in the course of the investigation.
  • Log delays.
  • Log procedural communications with administrators, attorneys, etc.
  • Deputy will organize and compile investigative documentation from all interviews.
    • As the interview proceeds, there may be additional individuals who are identified as appropriate to meet with as well. It also may be appropriate to meet with an individual more than once if the Deputy must clarify something or ask additional questions.
    • Gather appropriate documentation from each individual when possible.
  • Research and analyze the information gathered in conjunction with the policies and/or laws that may apply. Deputy will give critical thought to the complaint or inquiry, information and documentation gathered, and will determine if they need to verify or confirm any other aspects of their information or details of the situation.
  • Deputy will communicate with the Title IX/EEO Coordinator at this point, and schedule a Review Discussion to go over the information collected and the Deputy’s recommended finding. This discussion will also serve as an opportunity to consider if any further information must be sought in strengthening the recommendation.
  • Deputy will draft the Investigative Report.
    • If Deputy recommends a “Reasonable Basis to Proceed” the investigative report will be emailed to Title IX/EEO Coordinator and the respective Vice President.
    • Title IX/EEO Coordinator will facilitate discussion with the Vice President to determine appropriate follow up actions to be considered.
    • If Deputy recommends that there is “Not a Reasonable Basis to Proceed” the investigative report will be emailed to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator only.
  • The Deputy will draft Outcome Notifications to the Complainant and Respondent.
  • Title IX/EEO Coordinator must ensure accuracy of all documents.
  • Regardless of the recommended finding, the Outcome Notifications will be emailed or mailed to the Complainant and Respondent.
  • Deputy will organize all investigative notes, documents, policy and legal references relative to the investigation. Deputy will update CMS and upload appropriate documentation into the CMS file.
  • Deputy will convert all investigative information into electronic files. These, along with any other electronic files or email correspondence will be shared with the Title IX/EEO Coordinator. Hard copies of investigative information will also be provided to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator for secure, central filing.

 

Risk Reduction Strategies

  • It’s On Us Campaign: SDSU has initiated an It’s On Us Campaign to increase sexual assault awareness, bystander intervention and overall respect and care for all members of the SDSU community. In addition, the Campaign expresses SDSU’s prohibition of sexual assault, harassment and discrimination. Several videos, involving employees and students, have been created and will be displayed during major University events, and in the common areas of buildings across SDSU. In order to participate in the videos, students are employees were required to sign a pledge indicating their commitment to sexual assault prevention. As part of the Campaign, a website has been created and is available at sdstate.edu/itsonus. The website contains the videos, a link to the national It’s On Us campaign, SDSU Title IX related information.
  • New Student Orientation: The Division of Student Affairs hosts two-day orientation programs in June, July and August. During the programs, a session is offered to all incoming students and their parents that contains information about sexual assault prevention. In addition, The Title IX/EEO Coordinator sets up a table containing sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking prevention information and is available to answer questions and provide additional information.
  • The day after move-in, the Dean of Students and the Title IX/EEO Coordinator offer a 45-minute presentation regarding alcohol, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, consent, bystander intervention and how to report complaints, to all incoming freshmen. Approximately 1800 students attend the presentation.
  • Greek Life Presentations: Presentations are offered to members of Greek Life. In September 2015, a presentation was conducted to approximately 50 members of the Farm House Fraternity. Contacts will be made to other Greek Life organizations to encourage the members to host and attend Title IX related trainings.
  • Class Presentations: The Title IX/EEO Investigator and the Division of Student Affairs, provides presentations to various academic courses, upon request. In2015, 27 presentations were conducted to a total of approximately 665 students.
  • Special Topics- Title IX Course: The Title IX/EEO Coordinator will teach a one credit Title IX course, during the fall 2016 semester. The course will be offered free of charge to all full-time employees and at the usual cost to students. The course will cover the history of Title IX, Dear Colleague Letters, the importance of Title IX and the costs of non-compliance and SDSU policies and processes. In Fall 2015, 28 students successfully completed the course.
  • Student-Staff Training: The Title IX Office provides training for student-staff members, upon request. In August 2016, Title IX training was provided to approximately 180 student-staff members employed by Student Affairs. The training included the definitions of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking; Quid Pro Quo; consent; bystander intervention; and how to report complaints.
  • Outside Presenters: The Division of Student Affairs hosts outside presenters, who specialize in Title IX related topics, to provide education to students and employees. In 2015, three presenters were hired, and provided training to approximately 800 students; all students were invited to attend.
    • Safe Spring Break- On February 24, 2015, Elaine Pasqua conducted a presentation which included the following topics: 1) How to prepare for travel, 2) Consequences of high-risk drinking, 3) Sexual assault and consent to sexual activity, 4) Safe consumption of alcohol, 5) Date rape drugs, 6) Bystander Intervention, 7) Connection of unprotected sex to alcohol, 8) Consequences of unprotected sex, 9) Staying together, keeping each other safe and 10) Alternative spring break activities.
    • The Hook-Up- The Board of Regents, with the support of the Division of Student Affairs, hired Catharsis Productions to conduct a sexual assault and healthy relationships presentation, at all Board of Regents’ institutions. The presentation at SDSU was held on April 6, 2015, and included the following topics: 1) Interpersonal violence, 2) Bystander intervention, 3) Challenging pre-conceptions regarding sexual relationships, 4) Alcohol and sexual assault, 5) Consent and 6) What constitutes rape.
    • Sex and Excess: Surviving the Party: On September 8, 2015, Elaine Pasqua conducted a presentation which included the following topics: 1) High-risk drinking; 2) Definition of sexual assault; 3) Sexual assault; 4) Date rape drugs; 5) Sex under the influence; 6) Stalking, domestic violence, dating violence; 7) Bystander intervention; 8) Negative outcomes of unsafe sex; 9) Sexually transmitted infections and 10) Consent vs Coercion. In addition to an evening, student-focused, presentation, Ms. Pasqua also met with 1) the Athletic Department coaches and staff, 2) Counseling Center employees and3) Student-leaders including Gay-Straight Alliance members.
  • Fran Sepler: On May 9 and 10, 2016, Dr. Fran Sepler, from Sepler and Associates, conducted seven, small group and job specific, trainings, available to the entire campus community. Supervisors and senior level administrators were especially encouraged to attend, along with a group of students. Approximately 150 individuals completed the trainings.
  • R.A.D. (Rape Aggression Defense) Self-Defense for Women: Provided by UPD, this class is a minimum of nine hours in length. It provides education and awareness on self-defense techniques for women of all ages. It is offered continually at the request of any group, class or organization.
  • S.A.F.E (Self-Awareness and Familiarization Exchange): UPD offers this two-hour seminar every fall and spring semester. The focus of the class is on crime prevention and introducing the physical aspects of self-defense. It is offered year around at the request of any group, class or organization.
  • Sexual Assault Prevention Programming: HEROH’s peer educators offer and present sexual assault prevention programs over the course of the academic school year to the following groups: Athletic Department, Housing and Residential Life staff and residents, and Greek Life members. Presentations are offered to any SDSU group upon request.
  • Published Wellness Center Monthly Newsletter: This newsletter features articles on crime prevention multiple times per year. Topics that have been addressed include Preventing Sexual Assault, Self Defense Tips and resources available at the SDSU Counseling and Wellness Centers.
  • Strategic plan for improvement of exterior lighting and emergency phones including ongoing review and assessment of lighting and emergency phone access.

Recognition of Abusive Behaviors and Avoiding Potential Attacks

In terms of domestic and dating violence, abusive behavior is defined as follows. Harmful or unwanted behavior that is inflicted upon any person, by a partner of an intimate relationship. Abusive behavior is generally a pattern of control that one person exercises which physically harms, induces fear, prevents someone from acting at will or forces a person to behave in an unwanted manner. Abusive behavior can be verbal, psychological, emotional, financial, physical, sexual or spiritual in nature and can include threats, isolation and intimidation.

Individuals who witness or encounter abusive behaviors are recommended to:

  • Go to a safe area away from the abuser.
  • Contact the UPD (688-5117) or Brookings Police Department (692-2113) immediately.
  • Contact the SDSU Counseling Center (688-6146).
  • Report the situation to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator by calling 688-4128, or completing an on-line report at lighthouse-services.com/sdstate.
  • Report the situation to an SDSU faculty or staff member for support and assistance in further reporting of the incident.

What Victims Can Do Immediately Afterward

Anyone who believes they have been sexually assaulted or a victim of dating or domestic violence should contact any person in authority (police, residence hall staff, etc.) as soon as possible. For example:

  • Students who live in the residence halls may contact their hall staff.
  • Victims can call the UPD without making a formal report, at 605-688-5117, who will at the request of the student contact a SDSU Counselor. In addition, students will be advised of their option to report the Brookings Police Department and a provide assistance in reporting. If the assault occurred in another jurisdiction UPD will assist the victim report to the appropriate agency with jurisdiction. The Brookings Police Department can be contacted at 605-692-2113. The phone number for the Brookings County Sheriff’s Office 605-696-8300.
  • Students may contact the UPD to file an anonymous report and/or get information about resources and assistance without being required to provide further information.
  • Students may contact the Brookings Domestic Abuse Shelter by calling 605-692-SAFE (7233) for immediate assistance, information, and help in deciding options. All calls are confidential. The Brookings Domestic Abuse Shelter is a member of the Eastern Plains Sexual Assault Response Team (EPSART).
  • Victim of sexual assault are encouraged to contact the SDSU Title IX/EEO Coordinator at 605-688-4128.
  • Victims can also seek medical attention at through the Brookings Health System. Victims are not required to report the incident to law enforcement or Student Affairs before seeking medical attention.

Students and employees may report a sexual assault, stalking allegation and dating or domestic violence situation to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator on-line via lighthouse-services.com/sdstate or by calling the 24-hour, toll-free, reporting hotline at 1-844-880-0004. Reports can be filed anonymously. South Dakota state law requires that all felonies reported to any SDSU official also be reported to a law enforcement agency. Victims of the aforementioned crimes that did not result in a felony can decline to report the incident to law enforcement officials.

It is strongly recommended that victims seek medical attention. The Brookings Health System has Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) who are forensically trained in assisting and advocating for victims. Requesting a forensic evaluation does not require victim to file a police report. Victims are not responsible for the cost of the examination as stated in South Dakota Codified Law:

22-22-26.   Payment for rape or sexual offense examinations--Reimbursement by convicted defendant. If a physician, hospital, or clinic examines the victim of an alleged rape or sexual offense the examination shall be provided without cost to the victim. The physician, hospital, or clinic shall be paid for the cost of the examination by the county where the alleged rape or sexual offense occurred, which shall be reimbursed by any defendant if convicted.

Source: SL 1986, ch. 182; SL 2005, ch 120, § 402; SL 2012, ch 126, § 1; SL 2013, ch 108, § 1.

As part of the investigative process sexual assault victims are advised NOT to bathe, shower, douche, clean up, or change clothes. If a victim must change his/her clothing, they should put all of the clothing they were wearing in a paper bag and take it with them to a medical facility. Medical attention is necessary to evaluate any injuries (some may not be apparent), assess for sexually transmitted disease and/or pregnancy, and collect evidence. Although victims may not want to file a police report immediately after the incident, it is important for all victims to preserve evidence. Victims of sexual assault and other forms of harassment are also encouraged to protect and preserve digital information such as text, e-mails, phone calls and social media site information. If they choose to report the sexual assault in the future, the evidence can be used to support their allegations.

 

What SDSU Offers Students

Confidential counseling is available from the SDSU Counseling Center by calling 605-688-6146 to help victims deal with related feelings, which may include guilt, fear, shame, anger, embarrassment, or helplessness. Counseling services are available to all students, including assailants, regardless of whether the incident occurred on or off campus.

The victim’s academic, transportation and living situation will be changed upon request if reasonably available. In addition, SDSU will offer and provide victim assistance with financial aid and international student services, when applicable and requested. By law, instances must be reported to the campus Title IX/EEO Coordinator which may be done by the party receiving the initial report. The Title IX/EEO Coordinator records and investigates allegations of sexual harassment including sexual assault, stalking, domestic violence and dating violence, as well as discrimination and harassment. All investigations are conducted in a prompt, fair and impartial manner by Title IX Deputy Investigators who receive annual training pertaining to such allegations. Deputy investigators are also trained annually on how to conduct an investigation in a manner that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability. Incidents found to meet the criteria for sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking, according to a preponderance of evidence standard, will be remedied in a prompt, fair and impartial manner. All complainants and respondents will receive written notification of on-campus and community resources, including: counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy and legal assistance. 

Victims will be notified of the process and their right to file for temporary and permanent protection orders, free of charge, and the SDSU PD and the Title IX Office will assist students with doing so, upon request. In addition, SDSU will assist in the enforcement of protection orders, when made aware of such orders. The University will also evaluate the need for and institute campus bans or No Contact orders when requested.

Resources: On Campus

  • Emergency Assistance/Information and Safety Escorts
    • University Police Department 605-688-5117 (call from on-campus landline phones– 111) – this number is provided on the back of each SDSU student ID
  • Medical Services
    • SDSU Student Health (118 Wellness Center) 605-688-5588
  • Counseling Services
    • SDSU Counseling Center (118 Wellness Center) 605-688-6146
  • Student Conduct Procedures
    • Assistant Director for Student Conduct (167 Caldwell Hall) 605-688-6997
  • Student Affairs Office
    • Vice President for Student Affairs (312 Morrill Hall) 605-688-4493
    • Associate Vice President for Student Affairs (312 Morrill Hall) 605-688-4493
    • Dean of Students (312 Morrill Hall) 605-688-4493
  • Students’ Association
    • Legal advice without representation 605-695-8734
  • Title IX/EEO Coordinator (100 Morrill Hall)
    •  
  • Ombuds Office (Berg Hall, Room 114)

Resources: Off-Campus

    • Brookings Hospital Emergency Room (322 22nd Avenue) 605-696-9000
    • Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) who are forensically trained in assisting and advocating for victims (Brookings Hospital)
    • Brookings Medical Clinic (400 22nd Avenue) 605-697-9500
    • Brookings Domestic Abuse Shelter 605-692-SAFE (7233)
    • Brookings Police Department (307 3rd Avenue) 605-692-2113
    • Sheriff’s Office (315 Seventh Avenue) 605-696-8300

Range of Protective Measures

The institution will provide, in writing to the victim of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking, the range of accommodations and provide protective measures for the victim if requested and reasonable. The university will maintain as confidential any accommodations or protective measures provided to the victim, to the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the university to provide accommodations of protective measures.  The following are the most frequently utilized accommodations and protective measures, which can vary depending on the nature and severity of the allegations.

    • Housing relocation (Complainant or Respondent)
    • Removal from University housing (Complainant or Respondent)
    • Referral to Dean of Students
    • Counseling services
    • Legal aid services
    • Disability services
    • Multicultural Affairs’ Office
    • International Affairs’ Office
    • Excused absence from class
    • Extended time for assignment completion
    • Class assignment re-do
    • Re-take of course exam
    • Reschedule of course exam
    • Adjustment to course schedule (Complainant or Respondent)
    • Request to drop a course with no W on transcript
    • Request to drop a course/grade from transcript
    • Petition for an incomplete in a course
    • Parking accommodations
    • Assistance with financial aid
    • Assistance with contacting law enforcement
    • Referral to Brookings Area Domestic Abuse Shelter
  • Protective Measures:
    • No contact order
    • Ban from specific university-controlled areas
    • Come and go access (permission to only be on campus for courses)
    • Assistance with contacting law enforcement- report filing and protection orders
    • Removal or ban from participating in clubs or organizations
    • Ban from attending university-controlled events
    • Restriction of access to university-controlled public areas
    • Housing relocation (Complainant or Respondent)
    • Removal from University housing (Complainant or Respondent)
    • Adjustment to course schedule (Complainant or Respondent)
    • Referral to Brookings Area Domestic Abuse Shelter

 

  • University Disciplinary Sanctions and Procedures

Procedures for university disciplinary action follow the policies outlined in the SDSU Student Code. The following information applies to the SDSU Student Code of Conduct and accused perpetrators of harassment, which include sexual assault, rape, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking.

Disciplinary proceedings may be initiated in response to conduct that arises out of membership in the institutional community, regardless of location, otherwise prohibited under the student conduct code that adversely affects the institutional community or their pursuit of its objectives.

  1. The consumption of alcohol before or during the assault, by the survivor that violates law or policy will not be a Student Conduct matter and therefore should not prevent a survivor from reporting the incident.
  2. A preliminary investigation by the Vice President of Student Affairs, or designee, will determine whether interim measures shall be invoked. Interim measures, such as temporary suspension, bans students from attending classes and/or from entering specific University facilities for a designated period of time.
  3. The Vice President for Student Affairs, or designee, will determine if the case will be heard based on the preliminary investigation and the determination of what appears to be a case of sexual assault. Student Conduct will utilize a preponderance of evidence or “more likely than not” standard of evidence to resolve all cases, including harassment, discrimination, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking.
    1. The types of hearings utilized by SDSU are specified below. The type of hearing will be decided based on the information pertaining to the reported policy violation. An informal resolution will be utilized only when an outcome can be agreed upon by both students. When an outcome cannot be fully agreed upon, the formal process will be utilized, even if for only the sanctioning component.
      1. Informal: Typically, the student and one conduct hearing officer are present but students are welcome to bring an advisor. The accused student (Respondent) and the conduct officer may reach resolution on the outcome. Mediation will NOT be utilized for any matters directly or indirectly related to sexual misconduct.
      2. Formal: this process utilizes a panel trained in Title IX investigations and an experienced conduct officer, also trained in Title IX investigations, who facilitates the hearing process.  The panel comprises 3-5 employees, no students.  The participating students (respondent or complainant) may utilize an advisor, bring witnesses, and provide documentation. A student is welcome to bring any advisor of their choosing but the advisor may not represent the student and may not address any member of the panel directly during the course of the hearing.
    2. The steps in both types of hearings include contact with the respondent and complainant.  Neither party is required to participate.  Absent additional information, a hearing officer or panel will evaluate the entirety of the case based on the information provided.
    3. When students are participating, they will be provided the information that will be reviewed during the hearing prior to the hearing.  For formal hearings, student participants will be provided with the outline of the hearing process.
    4. Within fifteen (15) working days of the outcome of the Title IX investigation, the student conduct officer shall present all allegations to the student charged in written form and shall identify with specificity each section of this conduct code under which allegations are brought, the fact allegations that support the allegations, and those persons whose testimony shall be used to establish the allegations. A time shall be set for a hearing, not less than five (5) nor more than fifteen (15) calendar days after the student has been notified. The minimum time limits may be waived by the party charged. Maximum time limits for scheduling of hearings may be extended at the discretion of the student conduct officer.
    5. Whether the informal or formal process is used, every student engaged in the process will receive a fair and just review of the information, have the opportunity to articulate their point of view, and benefit from procedural due process.  Both the Complainant and Respondent have the right to appeal the outcome of a hearing regarding human rights violations. The appeal process is included later in this section. The process factors for determining the type of process to use regarding allegations of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking is as follows:
      1. The University will observe the victim’s wishes to the highest degree possible.  In cases indicating pattern, predation, threat, weapons and/or violence, the University will likely be unable to honor a request for confidentiality.  In cases where the victim requests confidentiality and the circumstances allow the University to honor that request, the University will offer interim supports and remedies to the victim and the community, but will not otherwise pursue formal action. A reporting party has the right, and can expect, to have reports taken seriously by University when reported, and to have those incidents investigated and properly resolved through these procedures. 
      2. If the Complainant indicates no interest in participating in a board hearing and it is unlikely that the hearing will result in expulsion, an administrative hearing can be utilized if the Respondent is amenable to that outcome.  If the Respondent prefers, a board hearing can be utilized but does not require participation from the Complainant.
  4. The Complainant and Respondent both have the same right to attend the hearing. Both parties may decide to participate or not. Parties who do not participate will accept that the University will rely on previously written statements in determining responsibility and sanctions.
  5. The Complainant and Respondent have the same right to have an advisor present during disciplinary hearing. The accuser and accused may also invite the advisor to accompany them to any related meeting or proceeding.
  6. The Complainant and Respondent shall be notified of the outcome simultaneously in writing of a campus disciplinary proceeding, including SDSU procedures for both parties to appeal the outcome. In addition, both Complainant and Respondent will be notified, in writing, of any change of the outcome before it becomes finalized, and when the outcome will be finalized. If the victim is deceased as a result of the sexual assault or rape, the next of kin will be notified in lieu of the victim provided that a written request is made.
  7. Disciplinary sanctions for these offenses range from a minimum of behavioral probation to a maximum of expulsion (indicated below). In addition, University campus bans, no contact directives or similar measures can be implemented to ensure the safety the victim and campus community at large.

Behavioral Probation – Behavioral probation is for a designated period of time and includes the probability of more severe conduct sanctions if the Respondent is later found to have engaged in any additional violation(s) the Student Code during the probationary period.

Residence Hall Suspension – Separation of the Respondent from the University’s residence facilities for a definite period of time, after which the Respondent is eligible to return. Conditions for return to the residence facilities may be specified.

Residence Hall Expulsion – Permanent separation of the Respondent from the University’s residence facilities. A sanction of residence expulsion will take the form of residence suspension pending completion of the appeals process.

Behavioral Suspension – Separation of the Respondent from the University for a definite period of time, after which the Respondent is eligible to return. Conditions for return may be specified. A Respondent who has been suspended from one University may not enroll at another University until the period of suspension has ended.

  • – Permanent separation of the Respondent from the University. A Respondent who has been expelled from one University may not enroll at another University. A sanction of expulsion will take the form of suspension pending completion of the appeals process.

Both the complainant and the respondent have the right to appeal the outcome as follows:

  1. The Respondent may appeal a decision reached by the Chair. In matters involving allegations of Human Rights Violations, the Complainant may also appeal a decision reached by the Chair. The appeal must be in writing and must be submitted to the Senior Student Affairs Officer no later than five (5) days after notice of the Chair’s decision is deemed received.
  2. The written appeal must cite at least one (1) of the following reasons for review and must include supporting arguments and documentation as to why an appeal should be granted on those grounds:
    • The original hearing was conducted unfairly to the point that it substantially and materially affected the outcome;
    • Using the facts found by the Chair, the conclusion regarding whether there was a violation(s) of the Student Code was incorrect;
    • The conduct sanction(s) imposed were not appropriate for the violation of the Student Code that the Respondent was found to have committed; and/or
    • New information that was unavailable at the time of the hearing has been discovered and could substantially and materially affect the outcome.
  3. An appeal shall be limited to a review of:
    • The verbatim record of the initial hearing;
    • Supporting documents submitted as part of the initial hearing; and
    • Supporting documents submitted in support of the appeal reason(s).
  • Type and Frequency of Programs regarding Campus Security Procedures and Practices, Crime Prevention, and Drug and Alcohol-Abuse

The key to preventing crime is awareness, which is best achieved through education. SDSU is committed to educating all students, faculty and staff.

Type and Frequency Campus Security Awareness Programs

  • New Student Orientation (NSO): At the nine two-day orientation programs in June, July, and August, a session on campus safety and security is provided to parents and students. Approximately 2,000 students and their parents attend the NSO sessions each summer.

 

  • International Student Orientation: The Office of International Affairs and the University Police Department present sessions on campus safety and security to international students twice a year, once in the fall and once in the spring.

 

  • Housing and Residence Hall Staff Fire Safety Training: During fall staff training, the live-in staff attend fire safety presentations and participate in fire safety exercises. This includes in-hall training on fire alarm response and procedures as well as education on fire safety policies. In addition, the Brookings Fire Department instructs the staff on fire safety and the proper use of fire extinguishers.

 

  • Housing and Residence Hall Student Staff and Full-time Staff Training: Every fall, all student and full-time staff attend training regarding campus safety and security.

 

  • Initial Residence Hall Meetings: These meetings are required for all hall residents and are held in the fall, during the first week of school in all twelve residence halls. Campus safety and security procedures are highlighted along with emergency response procedures and disciplinary policies.

 

  • Behavioral Intervention Team Staff Training: This team is comprised of staff from the Counseling Center, UPD, Housing & Residential Life, the Assistant Vice President for Safety and Security, Wellness Center, Human Resources, Academic Affairs, and is chaired by a representative of the Vice President for Student Affairs’ Office. Information on the Behavioral Intervention Team that includes the ability to refer a member of the community can be found on the following link.

 

  • Emergency planning and evacuation: The University places an emphasis on emergency planning. Fire drills are conducted in residential facilities every semester. With drills annually in academic buildings. All drills are evaluated upon completion with after action items noted and addressed. Emergency management training is conducted throughout the year.

 

Type and Frequency of Crime Prevention Programs

Crime prevention is an obligation shared by community members and those formally tasked with providing a safe and secure environment. The university provides a wide variety of training opportunities for the community. Students and employees are encouraged to be responsible for their own safety and security and the security of others. The programs listed below are designed to as a resource for this responsibility.

  • R.A.D. (Rape Aggression Defense) Self-Defense for Women:  UPD offers this class which is a minimum of nine hours in length. It provides education and awareness on self-defense techniques for women of all ages. It is offered continually at the request of any group, class or organization.

 

  • S.A.F.E (Self-Awareness and Familiarization Exchange): UPD offers this two-hour seminar every fall and spring semester. The focus of the class is on crime prevention and introducing the physical aspects of self-defense. It is offered year around at the request of any group, class or organization.

 

  • Sexual Assault Prevention Programming: UPD offers and presents sexual assault prevention programs over the course of the academic school year to the following groups: Athletic Department, Housing and Residential Life staff and residents, and Greek Life members. Presentations are offered to any SDSU group upon request.

 

  • Published Wellness Center Monthly Newsletter: This newsletter features articles on crime prevention multiple times per year. Topics that have been addressed include Preventing Sexual Assault, Self Defense Tips and the SDSU Counseling Center.

 

Type and Frequency of Drug and Alcohol Abuse Programs

  • Chemical Dependency assessments/screenings: The Counseling Center administers alcohol and chemical dependency assessments to students, and makes further recommendations for these students, when needed.

 

  • Think About It: Alcohol: This online class is offered individually to each student who is found responsible for a first violation of the alcohol policy. The information is intended to provide the student with information regarding social and physiological repercussions of alcohol use and abuse.

 

  • : This is an individualized education and counseling program to meet the needs of students who have a second alcohol policy violation or a first violation where health or safety were at risk. This involves an initial meeting and a follow-up meeting. BASICS utilizes a self-assessment instrument called e-CHUG to evaluate students’ alcohol use.

 

  • Wellness 100: This course is offered as an elective for academic credit. Course content includes drug and alcohol information in addition to other health and wellness topics.

 

  • Helping Everyone Reach Optimal Health (HEROH) Programs: HEROH is a student volunteer peer education organization which operates out of the SDSU Wellness Center. As peer educators, HEROH provides information regarding substance abuse in classrooms and residence halls. Presentations are conducted each fall and spring semester on timely topics such as binge drinking, alcohol poisoning and the dangers of driving under the influence of alcohol.

 

  • Choices and Prevention: This committee functions as a clearinghouse for student health and wellness initiatives on campus focusing on alcohol and substance education and prevention. CAP provides assistance through the use of social norms campaigns, educational activities (guest speakers and class presentations), programming and advertising.

 

  • Counseling Center Services: The Counseling Center employs four full-time and one part-time licensed counselors for mental health needs and referrals to alcohol programs. They also offer a National Screening Day for alcohol use once a year. Pamphlets are available in the waiting area and handouts on usage are given out on alcohol use.

 

  • Residence Life Programs: Residence life provides active programming on the topic of alcohol and drug use/abuse. Consideration is given to events associated with excessive alcohol use.

 

  • Published Wellness Center Monthly Newsletter: This newsletter provides information on alcohol and drug abuse awareness and prevention four times per year. For example, in the October newsletter, an article regarding the National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week was published and in the March newsletter, articles regarding “Spring Break Prevention Tips to promote Safe Drinking and Sexual Assault Awareness,” were published.

 

  • Spring Break Kits: HEROH provides the 'Spring Break Safety Prevention tips & kits' during
    • the annual SDSU Wellness Fair (February)
    • the week prior to spring break in the Wellness Center and on Main Street in the Union (March), and
    • eight presentations with kit(s) distribution (four Greek Life & four in Housing and Residential Life) (February and March).

 

  • Safe Ride: SDSU sponsors in partnership with the Brookings Area Transit Authority (BATA) a weekly evening transportation system for students Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights during the academic year. The program provides an alternative to driving home for impaired drivers and provides a safe ride home from area businesses.

 

  • Missing Student Notification Policy:
  1. Policy
    • For the purpose of this policy, a student is missing when the student’s whereabouts are unknown and unexplained for a period of time that would be regarded as highly unusual or suspicious by persons familiar with the student’s plans, habits or routines.
    • Any person, including those not affiliated with the University, may report a University student as missing by filing a report with the University. It is not necessary to wait until the student has been missing for twenty-four (24) hours before making such a report. Reports may be made to the Vice President for Student Affairs, successor, or designee, or at the University Police Department.
    • Current contact information for the Vice President for Student Affairs: South Dakota State University, Morrill Hall 312, Box 2201, Brookings, SD 57007; Telephone: 605-688-4493.
      • Current contact information for the University Police Department: 1405 Jack Rabbit Avenue South Dakota State University, Box 520, Brookings, SD 57007; Telephone: 111 from on-campus phones or 605-688-5117 from off-campus phones.
    • Upon receipt of a missing student report, the Vice President for Student Affairs, successor, or designee, will promptly notify the University Police Department, and the University will attempt to locate the student on campus or at other sites controlled by the University and engage the University Police Department in this effort.
      • Initial efforts to contact students will involve telephone or other electronic communications.
      • If unable to contact the students by electronic means, University personnel will attempt to contact the students at their residence on the campus or in the municipal limits of the city of Brookings.
      • If students who reside in University controlled residences do not respond to electronic contacts or to knocking on their doors, student affairs personnel may enter the students’ rooms in order to assess the condition of the room and to look for visible personal property (wallet, keys, cell phone or clothing) that might provide clues as to whether the student has taken an extended trip or other planned absence from the residence hall. If the initial investigation is being undertaken by the University Police Department, they will either request that student affairs personnel enter student rooms, or they will obtain search warrants.
      • University personnel may pursue such additional or other investigative activities as are reasonable under the circumstances.
    • If the University determines that the student has been missing for a period of twenty-four (24) hours, or if it cannot locate the student and it determines that the student appears to be missing, the University will immediately notify the Brookings City Police Department that the student is missing by calling 911 or by visiting 307 3rd Avenue, Brookings, South Dakota, or successor location of the Brookings City Police Department, unless the Brookings City Police Department was the entity that made the determination that the student is missing.
    • When the University notifies local law enforcement agencies, it will also notify such persons as the student may have designated as an individual to be notified pursuant to this policy in the event that the student becomes missing (see section 2h. below).
      • In the case of un-emancipated students under the age of eighteen (18), the University will notify the students’ custodial parents or legal guardians.
    • The University will determine whether circumstances suggest that others living, working or participating in activities at the University may be in danger, and if it determines that such a danger may exist, it will warn the campus.
    • The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is responsible for publishing this policy electronically through websites designed to convey emergency or law enforcement information; for incorporating its provisions into student handbooks or similar publications; and will otherwise assure that students know, or should know, of its provisions.
    • At the time that a student is accepted as a resident in University controlled housing, the student will be given an opportunity to designate an individual to be notified pursuant to this policy in the event that the student becomes missing.
      • Students will be provided confidential means to designate such individuals and to update their designations.
      • Such contact information will be held as a confidential student record and will only be accessible to authorized university officials and may not be disclosed outside a missing person investigation.

 

Un-emancipated students under the age of eighteen (18) will be informed that, in the event that they become missing, the University will notify a custodial parent or legal guardian pursuant to this policy.

 

II. Annual Fire Safety Report

This report is due October 1st of each year and contains:

  • A description of the fire safety system for each on-campus student housing facility.
  • The number of fire drills held the previous calendar year.
  • The institution’s policies or rules on portable electrical appliances, smoking, and open flames in student housing facilities.
  • Procedures for student housing evacuation.
  • Policies for fire safety education and training programs for students, faculty, and staff.
  • A list of the titles of each person or organization to which individuals should report that a fire has occurred.
  • Plans for future improvements in fire safety, if determined necessary by the institution.

 

Fire Reporting

When a fire incident occurs, the University fire alert system notifies UPD at a central control panel. Additionally, residential students and staff should report the fire to any Community Assistant, Residence Hall Director, Residential Life Area Coordinator, Residential Life Assistant Director, Residential Life Associate Director or Director of University Housing and Residential Life. Students living in University owned or controlled property should report the fire first by calling 911 then contact their property manager. After students have called 911 and are safe and secure, students in Greek community housing should contact the Greek Life Advisor.

Fire Safety – Procedures and Documentation

Any institution that maintains an on-campus student housing facility must collect fire statistics, publish an Annual Fire Safety Report, and keep a “fire log.” These requirements are separate from those of the campus crime reporting.

Fire Statistics: The following statistics must be collected and reported, both in the annual fire safety report and the Department of Education’s web-based data collection system, for each on-campus student housing facility.

  • The number of fires and the cause of each fire.
  • The number of deaths related to the fire.
  • The number of injuries related to the fire that resulted in treatment at a medical facility.
  • The value of property damage related to the fire.

 

Fires - Summary 2014-2016

 

 

 2014

 

 

2015 

 

 

2016

 

Name and Street Address of Facility

Fires

Injuries

Deaths

Fires

Injuries

Deaths

Fires

Injuries

Deaths

Ben Reifel Hall
1317 8th Street

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

Honor Hall 925 16th Avenue

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Shultz Hall 1426 Grove

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Meadows North
717 11th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Meadows South
707 11th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Binnewies Hall 821 16th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Brown Hall 1409 9th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Caldwell Hall 1512 Grove Ln.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Hansen Hall 817 11th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Spencer Hall 936 Student Center Ln.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Thorne Hall 924 Student Center Ln.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Abbott Hall 910 Student Center Ln.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mathews Hall 939 Student Center Ln.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Pierson Hall 921 Student Center Ln.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Waneta Hall 1026 9th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Wecota Annex 1021 Medary Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Young Hall 907 16th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Court 1 1414 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Court 2

1416 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Court 3

1418 8th St.  

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Court 4 1420 8th St. 

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Court 5 1422 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Court 6 1424 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 1 716 16th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 2 1602 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 3 1604 8th St. 

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 4 1606 8th St. 

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 5 1608 8th St. 

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 6 1610 8th St. 

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 7 1612 8th St. 

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 8 1614 8th St. 

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 9 1616 8th St. 

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

State Village 10 

1618 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

704 12th Ave Apts

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

910 11th St Apts

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

House 1 

907 8th Street

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Alpha Gamma Rho 

1929 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Alpha Xi Delta

0

0

0

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Alpha Xi Delta 2

0

0

0

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Alpha Xi Delta 3

0

0

0

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Inactive

Alpha Xi Delta 4

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Farm House 729 20th Ave

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sigma Alpha Epsilon

621 20th Avenue

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Pi Kappa Alpha

727 14th Avenue

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

710 Campanile Ave (formerly 13th Ave)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

House 4
712/714 13th Ave

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

House 5
1110 8th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

House 6
700 14th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

House 7
710 14th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

House 8
714 14th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

House 9
729 14th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Apartment 1-7 704 12th Ave.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Apartment 1-9 910 11th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1706 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1708 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1710 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1727 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1743 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1746 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1750 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1815 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1817 8th St.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Caveat:

         

2016 Fires in Ben Reifel were incidents of Arson which involved one individual lighting door decorations on fire. Minimal damage each instance, approximate estimate of overall damage is less than $20.

 

 

Fire Log:

The law requires institutions to use either a hard copy log or an electronic format. SDSU provides a hard copy log that is available at the UPD. The fire log for the most recent 60-day period must be open to public inspection, upon request, during normal business hours. Any portion of the log that is older than 60 days must be made available within two business days of a request for public inspection. Fires are recorded by the date they were reported. For each fire, the nature of the fire, the date the fire occurred, the time of day the fire occurred, and the general location of the fire are included. If a specific day is not listed, then no fires were reported on that day.

Policies and rules on fire safety in student housing facilities

Fire/Health/Safety Inspection
Room inspections are intended to ensure the health and safety of not only the room’s residents but other individuals who live in the community. Authorized Department of Housing and Residential Life Staff may inspect a resident’s room to ensure the room is free of fire, health, and safety threats. The Department of Housing and Residential Life will give at least a 24-hour notice to residents except in cases authorized by the Director of Housing and Residential Life to check on an imminent danger or need. These inspections are routinely completed during winter and spring break.

To guard against fire danger several policies apply in residential facilities. Please note that for the safety and protection of life and property, violation of these regulations will be grounds for immediate confiscation and possible disposal of prohibited item(s) and as necessary, action through the Student Conduct process.

 

 Fire Safety Systems in SDSU Residential Facilities Fall 2016

SYSTEM TYPES LEGEND:

A. Automatic Sprinkler System 

B. Fire Alarm System Monitored by the University Police Department

C. Smoke Alarm in each sleeping room, interconnected and in common areas and suites

D. Individual Battery Operated Smoke Alarms

Residential Facilities

Residence Type

System Type(s)

Fire Extinguisher Devices

Evacuation Plans & Placards

Number of Evacuation (Fire) Drills Each Calendar Year

Abbott Hall 910 Student Center Lane

Residence Hall

A, B, C

YES

YES

2

Ben Reifel Hall
1317 8th Street

Residence Hall

A, B, C

YES

YES

2

Binnewies Hall
821 16th Avenue

Residence Hall

B, C

YES

YES

2

Brown Hall
1409 9th Street

Residence Hall

B, C

YES

YES

2

Caldwell Hall
1512 Grove Lane

Residence Hall

B, C

YES

YES

2

Hansen Hall
817 11th St

Residence Hall

B, C

YES

YES

2

Honors Hall
925 16th Avenue

Residence Hall

A, B, C

YES

YES

2

Hyde Hall
1425 8th Street

Residence Hall

A, B, C

YES

YES

2

Mathews Hall
939 Student Center Ln

Residence Hall

B, C

YES

YES

2

Meadows North
717 11th St

Apartment

A, B, C

YES

YES

2

Meadows South
707 11th St

Apartment

A, B, C

YES

YES

2

Pierson Hall
921 Student Center Ln

Residence Hall

B, C

YES

YES

2

Schultz Hall
1426 Grove Lane

Residence Hall

A, B, C

YES

YES

2

Spencer Hall
936 Student Center Ln

Residence Hall

A, B, C

YES

YES

2

State Court 1
1414 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Court 2
1416 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Court 3
1418 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Court 4
 1420 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Court 5
1422 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Court 6
1424 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 1
716 16th Ave

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 2
1602 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 3
1604 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 4
1606 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 5
1608 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 6
1610 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 7
1612 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 8
1614 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 9
1616 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

State Village 10
1618 8th St

Family Apartment

C

YES

YES

0

Thorne Hall
924 Student Center Ln

Residence Hall

A, B, C

YES

YES

2

Waneta Hall
1026 9th Ave

Residence Hall

B, C

YES

YES

2

Young Hall
907 16th Avenue

Residence Hall

B, C

YES

YES

2

House
907 8th Street

House

D

YES

NO

0

House
911 8th Street

House

D

YES

NO

0

Alpha Gamma Rho 1929 8th St

Fraternity

C

YES

NO

2

Alpha Xi Delta 4
715 20th Avenue

Fraternity

A

YES

NO

2

Farm House
729 20th Ave

Fraternity

C

YES

NO

2

Sigma Phi Epsilon
710 Campanile Ave (formerly 13th Ave)

Fraternity

D

YES

NO

2

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 3 621 20th Avenue

Fraternity

A

YES

NO

2

Pi Kappa Alpha
727 14th Avenue

Fraternity

D

YES

NO

2

House 4 712 1/2 & 712/714 13th Ave (one structure)

Five Plex

D

YES

NO

0

House 5 1110 8th ST

House

D

NO

NO

0

Apartment 1-7 

704 12th Ave

House

D

YES

NO

0

Apartment 1-9 

910 11th St.

House

D

YES

NO

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1706 8th St.

Townhouse

D

YES

NO

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1708 8th St.

Townhouse

D

YES

NO

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1710 8th St.

Townhouse

D

YES

NO

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1727 8th St.

Townhouse

D

YES

NO

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1743 8th St.

Townhouse

D

YES

NO

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1746 8th St.

Townhouse

D

YES

NO

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1750 8th St.

Townhouse

D

YES

NO

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1815 8th St.

Townhouse

D

YES

NO

0

Garden Square Townhouses
1817 8th St.

Townhouse

D

YES

NO

0

 

Portable electrical appliances

The capacity of the electrical system in the residence halls is limited. Overloading these systems can present fire and safety hazards. If students want to increase the number of outlets in their room, they are required to use Underwriter Laboratory (UL) approved multiple outlet power strips that must be plugged directly into wall outlets. All power strips and UL cords must be in good condition. Power strips must have 15 amp circuit breakers.

Radios, stereos, desk lamps, televisions and other small appliances are permitted, provided the equipment is kept in safe operating condition. However, lamps with halogen bulbs are not permitted. The only cooking equipment permitted in student rooms are appliances made of solid-state construction with thermostats, no open coils, and automatic shut-offs (i.e. crock-pots, coffee pots).

  • Two refrigerators per room are permitted; each must not individually exceed 5 cubic feet.
  • Only one microwave per room is permitted; not to exceed more than 700 watts.
  • Electric grills are permitted for use in kitchen areas only.

The following items are not permitted in SDSU residence halls:

  • Open element appliances such as space heaters, immersion heaters, kerosene heaters, hot plates, broilers, ovens, or electric skillet/fry pans.
  • Sun lamps, halogen lamps, and neon signs.
  • Air conditioning units not provided by the University.
  • Outside antennae/satellite dishes.
  • Potpourri pots (candle and electric)
  • Candle warmers.

Further, no internal combustion engines will be allowed in the residence halls. This includes, but is not limited to: motorized scooter/skateboards, lawn tools, remote controlled toys, etc.

Smoking

All SDSU residences are smoke-free. Smoking is not permitted anywhere in the facilities, and those smoking outside of the halls must be at least 25 feet from any building entrance, window, or air intake. In addition, Housing and Residential Life bans the use of all other tobacco products in all residence hall community areas.

Open flames

Use of candles with a wick or use of any other item that has an open flame or burning embers is prohibited. Decorative candles with the wick(s) removed or cut off are permitted. However, candle warming plates are not allowed. The use of incense that must be ignited is prohibited. Spray scents are allowed.

Other Fire Hazards

  • Heat sensors and/or smoke detectors shall not have anything attached to or within 2 feet of them. It is a violation of fire code to cover, tamper with, or tape over a smoke or heat sensor.
  • Nothing may be hung from light fixtures, fire detectors/sprinklers, or ceilings.
  • Flammable liquids, including charcoal lighter fluid, propane tanks and explosives are not allowed in the residence halls.
  • Fire towers and enclosed stairways are regulated by state and local fire codes. No flammable items may be stored, hung, or placed in these spaces. In addition, these spaces must be kept free of any item that may obstruct clear and safe passage.

Fire Detection Equipment
Fire alarms, firefighting and detection equipment installed in the halls are for the safety of all residents. Every residence hall room contains a smoke alarm and heat sensor. Residents are expected to become familiar with their location and operation. In case of a fire, students should activate the nearest alarm station.

Tampering with firefighting or fire detection equipment endangers the lives of all residents. Cases of tampering are investigated and responsible individuals face serious campus and legal action.

Fire Alarm Evacuation
It is the policy of the university that everyone is required to leave the building immediately and in an orderly fashion when the fire alarm is sounded and to remain outside until authorized to reenter by the Brookings Fire Department or UPD. The primary intention of an alarm is to clear the building and save lives. Unless every other evacuation route is inaccessible, do not jump from a window during a fire alarm.

The hall staff will conduct general safety meetings early in each semester on all emergencies, but as a general rule, in the event of a real fire:

  1. Move as close to the floor as possible when there is smoke.
  2. Check doors to see if they are hot before proceeding.
  3. Occupants who are unable to evacuate a room should:
    • Stuff towels under the door.
    • Hang a sheet from the window as this indicates to fire fighters people are trapped in the room.

False Alarms
False fire alarms are illegal and dangerous. Every time a building is evacuated there is the possibility of injury. Frequent false alarms tend to create a feeling of false security and it becomes more difficult to evacuate the building. In the event of an actual fire, this could lead to serious consequences. For these reasons, everyone must evacuate immediately every time the alarm sounds. Students who do not evacuate the hall during a fire alarm will face student conduct action. Any student found guilty of causing a false fire alarm or fire will be subject to suspension, arrest and fines.

Policies for Fire Safety Education and Training Programs for Students and Employees

Each residence hall is supervised by a residence hall director. Family Student Housing and Student Apartments are under the supervision of an Apartment Manager. Each residence hall is also staffed with undergraduate students serving as Senior Community Assistants (SCA) and Community Assistants (CA). These individuals receive training throughout the school year outlining fire and emergency evacuation procedures as well as working with UPD and emergency personnel.

Soon after the residence halls open for the year, residents attend a community meeting with their CA. At that meeting, the CA outlines fire and emergency evacuation procedures and discusses policies and procedures regarding electrical appliances, smoking, and open flames. Students also receive a copy of the Department of Housing and Residential Life Handbook & Planner that contains policies and procedures regarding fire and personal safety.

Additionally, CA staff members check residence hall rooms during semester and spring breaks. At this time the CA ensures that students are in compliance with fire and other life safety policies.

Plans for Future Improvements in Fire Safety

Fraternities

No improvements are planned in the coming year.

Residential and Non-Residential Campus Facilities

A building warden will be implemented for each building on campus that has occupants. The Building Warden (BW) is a volunteer who is trained to assist with communications, evacuation and coordination of building occupants when an emergency occurs. BW representatives should provide for successful coordination of general safety within their SPECIFIC building(s) of responsibility, and assisting with the evacuations within their assigned building(s). Volunteers need to have approval from their Department Head/Director or Designated representatives.

Prior to an emergency the Building Wardens should:

  • Designate an adequate number of Floor/Area Wardens for the building in which they are responsible.
  • Provide training to the Floor/Area Wardens outlining their responsibilities.
  • Provide training to the building occupants in the areas of fire and life safety, evacuations, and how to react during an emergency.
  • Conduct or assist in evaluation of the readiness of buildings and life safety systems.
  • Be present during any life safety inspections, installations, maintenance or repair of life safety devices in a building or workplace.
  • Assist Department Head(s) with filling out the Building Emergency Plan template.

During an emergency the Building Wardens may:

  • Assist the Area/Floor Wardens who will verify everyone is out of the building and report missing occupants to emergency responders.
  • Establish the nature of an emergency when possible.
  • Order evacuations when needed.
  • Control evacuations as needed.
  • Record evacuation details.

The Area/Floor Warden representatives are responsible for a specific building area or floor, and must become familiar with the escape and evacuation drill procedures within their area of responsibility.

During an emergency the Area Wardens should:

  • Typically be responsible for successful coordination of general safety and assisting with evacuations within their assigned building.
  • Inform people when they need to evacuate in the event of an emergency.
  • Facilitate / coordinate the safe and efficient evacuation of building occupants to the designated Assembly Area.
  • Verify that everyone is out of the building and report missing occupants to the Building Warden.

An Area/Floor Warden, to the extent that it can be done safely should be ready to assist persons needing assistance during an emergency.

The Building and Area Wardens are provided with all the training necessary to complete this specialized function.

The Building Emergency Plan (BEP) is a tool to identify specific equipment and processes in your building. It will provide information for building occupants and for the emergency responders that may have to provide services in an emergency. A template is provided to help build the BEP. Utilizing the template will help keep all plans consistent throughout campus.

The BEP is designed to provide students, faculty, staff and visitors basic warning notification system, shelter‐in‐place and building evacuation emergency information for natural and human caused incidents.

Facilities & Services

No improvements are planned in the coming year.

 

Appendix A: Report Campus Crime to UPD or Any of These Personnel: Campus Safety Authorities (CSA)

 

Department

Title

Office

Last Name

First Name

E-mail

@sdstate.edu

Phone

Area code 605

University Police Department

UPD Dispatch Personnel

SSOR 104

 

 

688-5117

University Police Department

University Police Chief

SSOR 104

Heaton

Timothy

Timothy.Heaton

688-5117

University Police Department

Administration Supervisor

SSOR 104

Taylor

William

William.Taylor

688-5117

University Police Department

Investigations Supervisor

SSOR 104

Schultz

Brandon

Brandon.Schultz

688-5117

University Police Department

Patrol Supervisor

SSOR 104

Kilber

Michael

Michael.Kilber

688-5117

Student Affairs

Vice President for Student Affairs

SAD 312

Willis

Michaela

Michaela.Willis

688-4493

Student Affairs

Associate Vice President for Student Affairs

SAD 312

Wermedal

Douglas

Douglas.Wermedal

688-4493

Student Affairs

Dean of Students

SAD 312

Jennings

Sam

Sam.Jennings

688-4493

Student Affairs

Wellness Center Director

SSWC 113

VACANT

VACANT

 

688-6861

Student Affairs

Student Health Clinic Associate Director

SSWC 115

Andersen

Brenda

Brenda.Andersen

688-4157

Student Affairs

Assistant Director for Community Fitness

SSWC 111

Landmark

Shari

Shari.Landmark

688-5386

Student Affairs

Clinical Counseling Supervisor – Assistant Director

SSWC 159

Nichols

Darci

Darci.Nichols

688-6146

Student Affairs

Health Educator

SSWC 111C

Weber

Mariah

Mariah.Weber

688-4312

Student Affairs

Community Fitness Coordinator

SSWC 111

Brown

Kerry

Kerry.Brown

688-4543

Student Affairs

Senior Director - Student Union

SSU 150

Novotny

Jennifer

Jennifer.Novotny

688-4960

Student Affairs

Student Union Assistant Director Student Union

SSU 150

Skogstad

Keith

Keith.Skogstad

688-4960

Student Affairs

Director of Student Engagement

SSU 150

Wendell

Nick

Nick.Wendell

688-4960

Student Affairs

Director of New Student Orientation

SSU 150

Karnopp

Adam

Adam.Karnopp

688-4960

Student Affairs

Assistant Director for Student Engagement

SSU 136

Borah

Addie

Addie.Borah

688-4425

Student Affairs

Greek Life Advisor

SSU 136

Haarstad

Alan

Alan.Haarstad

688-4425

Student Affairs

Associate Director for Career Development

SSU 136

Fuller Bordewyk

Sherry

Sherry.Bordewyk

688-4425

Student Affairs

Senior Director of Multicultural Affairs & TRiO Programs

SSU 065

Douglas

C.D.

C.D.Douglas

688-4504

Student Affairs

Coordinator of Disability Services

SSU 065

Hartenhoff-Crooks

Nancy

Nancy.Crooks

688-4504

Student Affairs

Assistant Director for Student Conduct

SCH 2810

Schmaedeke

James

James.Schmaedeke

688-6997

Student Affairs

Coordinator for Student Conflict Prevention

SCH 2810

James

Virginia

Virginia.James

688-6997

Student Affairs

Director of Housing and Residential Life

SCH 2810

Hale

Jeff

Jeffrey.Hale

688-5148

Student Affairs

Associate Director of Housing and Residential Life

SCH 2810

Kaberline

Chris

Chris.Kaberline

688-5148

Student Affairs

Associate Director of Living, Learning and Outreach

SCH 2810

Uecker

Toby

Toby.Uecker

688-5148

Student Affairs

Housing and Residential Life Area Coordinator- West

SCH 2810

Dominguez

Brian

Brian.Dominguez

688-5148

Student Affairs

Housing and Residential Life Area Coordinator- East

SCH 2810

Miller

Maggie

Margaret.Miller

688-5148

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director- Young Hall

SYH 143

Maples

Joshua

Joshua.Maples

688-5424

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director- Brown Hall

SBH 137

Kandell

Andy

Andrew.Kandell

688-6524

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director- Hansen Hall, Waneta and Meadows South

SHN 153

TBD

TBD

TBD

688-5148

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director-Mathews Hall

SMH 101

Diischer

John (Matt)

John.Diischer

688- 6318

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director-Pierson Hall

SPR 128

Miner

Eric

Eric,Miner

688- 4026

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director-Binnewies Hall

SBN 144

Walker

Brooke

Brooke.Walker

688- 4824

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director- Caldwell Hall

SCH 127

Sylvestre

Amy

Amy.Sylvestre

688-4718

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director- Abbott, Spencer and Thorne Hall

SSH 102

Gissing

Daniel

Daniel.Gissing

688-5140

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director- Hyde and Ben Reifel Halls

SREF 128

Hereen

Lauren

Lauren.Hereen

688-5136

Student Affairs

Resident Hall Director- Honors and Schultz Halls

SSCH 114

Mayrose

Andrea

Andrea.Mayrose

688-5183

Student Affairs

Director – American Indian Student Center

SESC 010

Eastman

April

April.Eastman

688-4066

Student Affairs

Program Director- TRIO SSS

SMC 120

Vostad

Jeffrey

Jeffrey.Vostad

688-6653

Student Affairs

Director of Admissions

SESC 511

Welsh

Tracy

Tracy.Welsh

688-4486

Student Affairs

Director of Financial Aid

SECC 511A

Halgerson

Carolyn

Carolyn.Halgerson

688-4703

ARAMARK

Director of Operations

SSU 073

Frederiksen

JoLee

Jolee.Frederiksen

697-2552

President's Office

President

SAD 222

Dunn

Barry

Barry.Dunn

688-4111

President’s Office

Chief of Staff

SAD 222

Weber

Karyn

Karyn.Weber

688-4111

University Counsel

University Counsel

SAD 222

Greene

Tracy

Tracy.Greene

688-5248

Academic Affairs

Provost & Vice President for Academic Affairs

SAD 230

Hedge

Dennis

Dennis.Hedge

688-4173

Finance & Business

Vice President for Finance & Business

SAD 324

Tschetter

Wesley

Wesley.Tschetter

688-4920

Information Technology

Vice President Technology and Safety

SAD 208

Adelaine

Michael

Michael.Adelaine

688-4988

Research

Vice President for Research & Sponsored Programs

SAD 200

Kephart

Kevin

Kevin.Kephart

688-5642

Academic Affairs

Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs

SAD 230

Helling

Mary Kay

Mary.Helling

688-4173

Safety & Security

Assistant Vice President for Safety & Security

SAD 208

Challis

Donald

Donald.Challis

688-5260

Facilities

Assistant Vice President for Facilities & Services

FSB 100

Kattelmann

Dean

Dean.Kattelmann

688-4136

Diversity Enhancement

Chief Diversity Officer

SAD 217

VACANT

VACANT

 

688-6556

Academic Affairs

Dean of Agriculture & Biological Services

SAG 131

Scholl

Daniel

Daniel.Scholl

688-4148

Academic Affairs

Dean of Arts & Sciences

SWG 251

Papini

Dennis

Dennis.Papini

688-4723

Academic Affairs

Dean of Education & Human Services

SWG 249

Thorngren

Jill

Jill.Thorngren

688-6181

Academic Affairs

Dean of Engineering

SCEH 201

Brown

Lewis

Lewis.Brown

688-4161

Academic Affairs

Dean of University College

SMC 123

Corbett

Keith

Keith.Corbett

688-4153

Academic Affairs

Dean of Honors College

SBL 126

Bott

Rebecca

Rebecca.Bott

688-5268

H.M. Briggs Library

Chief University Librarian

SBL 108

Tornquist

Kristi

Kristi.Tornquist

688-5106

Academic Affairs

Dean of Nursing

SWG 255

Fahrenwald

Nancy

Nancy.Fahrenwald

688-4098

Academic Affairs

Dean of Pharmacy

SAV 133

Mort

Jane

Jane.Mort

688-5591

Academic Affairs

Dean of the Graduate School

SAD 130

Doerner

Kinchel

Kinchel.Doerner

688-4181

Academic Affairs

Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs, International Affairs and Outreach

SBL

Fairfax

Kathleen

Kathleen.Fairfax

688-4156

Academic Affairs

International/Study Abroad Coordinator

SBL

Gillman

Sally

Sally.Gillman

688-4154

Academic Affairs

Director International Students & Scholars

SBL

Wyman

Greg

Greg.Wyman

688-5228

University College

Director First Year Advising Center

SWSC 112

Owen

Jody

Jody.Owen

688-4155

Environmental Health and Safety

Emergency Management Specialist

SAD 119

Trygstad

Jayme

Jayme.Trygstad

688-4260

Human Resources

Assistant Vice President for Human Resources

SAD 318

Serrett

Marc

Marc.Serrett

688-4128

Human Resources

Employee Relations Specialist

SAD 318

Hanson

David

David.Hanson

688-4128

Human Resources

Assistant Director of Human Resources

SAD 318

Loban

Louise

Louise.Loban

688-4128

Title IX / EO

Title IX and EEO Compliance Officer

SAD 318

Johnson

Michelle

Michelle.Johnson

688.4128

Athletics

Director of Athletics

SPE 253B

Sell

Justin

Justin.Sell

688-5533

Athletics

Senior Associate Athletic Director/Senior's Women's Administrator

SPE 255

Heylens

Kathy

Kathy.Heylens

688-5308

Athletics

Senior Associate Athletic Director - Administration

SPE 251

Mahr

Matt

Matt.Mahr

688-6294

Athletics

Senior Associate Athletic Director – Facilities and Operations

SPE 253A

Holm

Jeff

Jeff.Holm

688-6287

Athletics

Head Coach – Baseball

SPE 275

Bishop

Rob

Rob.Bishop

688.5027

Athletics

Head Coach – Men’s Basketball

SPE 281

Otzelberger

T.J.

TJ.Otzelberger

688.5626

Athletics

Head Coach – Women’s Basketball

SPE 271

Johnston

Aaron

Aaron.Johnston

688.6336

Athletics

Head Coach – Cross Country

DSAC 244

DeHaven

Rod

Rod.DeHaven

688.5994

Athletics

Head Coach – Equestrian

Equine Facility

Wilkins

Ellie

Elizabeth.Wilkins

688.6856

Athletics

Head Coach – Football

DSAC 238

Stiegelmeier

John

John.Stiegelmeier

688.6955

Athletics

Head Coach – Golf

SPE 119

VanDamme

Casey

Casey.VanDamme

688.5329

Athletics

Head Coach – Soccer

SPE 262S

Wedemeyer

Lang

Lang.Wedemeyer

688.4070

Athletics

Head Coach – Softball

SPE 277

Wood

Krista

Krista.Wood

688.4326

Athletics

Assistant Athletic Director – Sports Medicine

SPE 150B

Heinze

Ben

Benjamin.Heinze

688.5299

Athletics

Assistant Athletic Director - Strength & Conditioning

DSAC 104B

Moe

Nate

Nathan.Moe

688.4803

Athletics

Head Coach – Swimming

SPE 257

Erickson

Brad

Brad.Erickson

688.6527

Athletics

Head Coach – Tennis

SPE 274

Barnes

Joey

Joey.Barnes

688.6297

Athletics

Head Coach – Volleyball

SPE 273

Cirillo

Nicole

Nicole.Cirillo

688.5819

Athletics

Head Coach – Wrestling

SPE 260

Bono

Chris

Chris.Bono

688.5026

 

 

 

 

Appendix B: 4:5 Prevention of Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

Office/Contact: Office of Human Resources

Source: SDBOR Policy 1:17.1 and 1:18

Link: https://www.sdbor.edu/policy/documents/1-17-1.pdf;https://www.sdbor.edu/policy/documents/118.pdf   

SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY

Policy and Procedure Manual

SUBJECT: Prevention of Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking NUMBER: 4:5

  1. Purpose

State and federal laws and policies strictly prohibit dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, often treating such actions as criminal offenses.  Such misconduct is not permitted or tolerated at the University.  This policy and its procedures set forth standards regarding reports of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking and the consequences of engaging in such misconduct at the University.

  1. Definitions
  • Dating violence means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

 

  • The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of the relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

 

  • For the purposes of this definition:
    1. Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.
    2. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

 

  • Domestic violence means a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by:

 

  • A current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;

 

  • A person with whom the victim shares a child in common;

 

  • A person who is cohabiting with, or has cohabited with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner;

 

  • A person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or

 

  • Any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

 

  • For purposes of this section, violent crimes are determined under the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, which classifies four (4) offenses involving force or threat of force as violent crimes: murder and non-negligent manslaughter, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault, as set forth in 34 C.F.R. part 668 Appendix A to Subpart D of part 668 – Crime Definitions in Accordance with the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program:
  • Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter means the willful (nonnegligent) killing of one human being by another.
  • Rape means the penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
  • Robbery means the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence or by putting the victim in fear.
  • Aggravated Assault means an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. (It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife, or other weapon is used which could and probably would result in serious personal injury if the crime were successfully completed.)

 

  • Sexual Assault means any offense that constitutes rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape:

 

  • Rape has the same meaning as given above in 2.b.vi.2.

 

  • Fondling means the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of their age or because of their temporary or permanent mental incapacity.

 

  • Incest means sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by SDCL § 25-1-6, which provides that:

 

Marriages between parents and children, ancestors and descendants of every degree, and between brothers and sister of the half as well as the whole blood, and between uncles and nieces, or aunts and nephews, and between cousins of the half as well as of the whole blood, are null and void from the beginning, whether the relationship is legitimate or illegitimate. The relationships provided for in this section include such relationships that arise through adoption.

 

  • Statutory Rape means sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of sixteen (16).

 

  • Stalking means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:

 

  • Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or

 

  • Suffer substantial emotional distress.

 

  • For the purposes of this definition:
    1. Course of conduct means two or more acts including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communications to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
    2. Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
    3. Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

 

  • Consent may be implied from the facts and circumstances surrounding the commission of an act. Consent will not be found where an act has been done through the use of force, coercion, or threats of immediate and great bodily harm. Submission does not equal consent, and to establish consent, a party must utterly negate any element of force, coercion, or threat. Consent, once given, may be retracted. Consent will not be found under any of the following circumstances:

 

  • If the victim is less than thirteen (13) years of age; or

 

  • Through the use of force, coercion, or threats of immediate and great bodily harm against the victim or other persons within the victim’s presence, accompanied by apparent power of execution; or

 

  • If the victim is incapable, because of physical or mental incapacity, of giving consent to such act; or

 

  • If the victim is incapable of giving consent because of any intoxicating, narcotic, or anesthetic agent or hypnosis; or

 

  • If the victim is thirteen (13) years of age, but less than sixteen (16) years of age, and the perpetrator is at least three (3) years older than the victim.
  • To the extent that this policy is intended to implement protections arising under the criminal law, amendments to those underlying statutes will be deemed to have been incorporated hereon on the effective date of such amendments.

 

  • For purposes relating to the annual security report required under the Jeanne Clery

Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (20 USC § 1092(f)), conduct constituting dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking under this policy shall be reported as crime, irrespective of its treatment under South Dakota law. 

 

i. For purposes of its annual security report a statement of policy that addresses the institution’s programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking, the South Dakota criminal law classifications align with the definitions set out in this policy as follows: 

  1. Consent is defined as set forth in 2.e. above;
  2. Dating violence includes domestic abuse as defined in SDCL ch. 25-10 that occurs between persons involved in a romantic relationship as defined in SDCL § 25-10-3.2 who are not cohabiting and who have never cohabited;
  3. Domestic violence includes domestic abuse as defined in SDCL ch. 2510 that occurs between persons involved in a romantic relationship as defined in SDCL § 25-10-3.2 who are cohabiting and who have cohabited;
  4. Sexual assault includes rape as defined in SDCL § 22-22-1; sexual contact with a minor as defined in SDCL § 22-22-7; sexual contact as defined in SDCL § 22-22-7.1 without consent as set forth in SDCL § 2222-7.4 or with a person incapable of consenting as set forth in SDCL §

22-22-7.2; and attempts to commit such offenses as defined in SDCL § 22-4-1; and 

5. Stalking includes stalking as defined in SDCL ch 22-19A. 

  1. Policy

 

  • Any student, employee, or other person participating in University activities or using University facilities who engages in conduct that would constitute dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, as defined herein, in circumstances that implicate the person’s fitness to study, work, participate in the functions or use the facilities at the University will be held accountable for their conduct and may be expelled, terminated, denied further participation in University programs or use of University facilities, or otherwise disciplined, upon notice and opportunity to be heard.

Students will also be subject to sanctions as set forth in University Policy 3:1, Student Conduct Code, and other perpetrators will be subject to the disciplinary procedures applicable to their status at the University.  The decision to pursue disciplinary charges of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking will not preclude pursuit of additional, related charges arising from the same facts.

 

  • The Title IX/EEO Coordinator is responsible for review and handling reports of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking at the University in conjunction with federal and state law and SDBOR and University policies.

 

  • Title IX/EEO Coordinator contact information shall be maintained and made available in, and disseminated to the University community and general public by, the University Title IX/EEO Coordinator Office located in the University Office of Human Resources, or successor unit.

 

  • The Title IX/EEO Coordinator will establish and coordinate educational and training programs for members of the University community to engage awareness and to help prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking at the University. The requirements and method of training will be dependent on an individual’s role in the University community.The Title IX/EEO Coordinator is responsible for developing and following a training protocol to meet the necessary requirements.

 

  • The Title IX/EEO Coordinator, not Deputies, is responsible for posting notices to students, staff, visitors, and other members of the University community to inform them of SDBOR and University policies and procedures and of their rights as potential victims of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, strategies for selfprotection, and University resources for reporting incidents and preserving evidence. Such notices will encourage victims to report incidents to the Title IX/EEO Coordinator and will contain a clear, accurate identification of the person currently serving as the Title IX/EEO Coordinator at the University.Such notices will also make reference to University and community resources available to assist victims.

 

  1. Procedures

 

  • Victims of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking at the University should contact the Title IX/EEO Coordinator, or Deputy, at the University to make a report.In cases of emergency, victims should call 111 from on-campus phones and 911 from off-campus phones to reach University Police.Victims may also utilize one of the fifteen emergency call boxes located across campus, and a University Police Officer will respond to the area immediately.

 

  • Upon receipt of such a report, the Title IX/EEO Coordinator will meet with the victim to discuss the incident and resources available at the University and in the community to assist the individual.

 

  • The Title IX/EEO Coordinator, University Police, and any other appropriate University official(s) made aware of the misconduct will take appropriate safety measures to help prevent the misconduct from occurring again.

 

  • The Title IX/EEO Coordinator and other affiliated parties should follow the procedures set forth in University Policy 4:6 regarding the complaint and investigation process following such misconduct.

 

  1. Responsible Administrator

 

The Title IX/EEO Coordinator, successor, or designee is responsible for annual and ad hoc review of this policy and its procedures. The University President is responsible for approval of modifications to this policy and its procedures.

 

SOURCE: Approved by President on 08/01/2014.

            Revised in conjunction with SDBOR revisions; Approved by President on 09/30/2015.

             

Appendix C:Community Notification of Potential, Imminent or Active Threat to the University

 

Office/Contact: Division of Technology and Security

Source: Clery Act, codified at 20 U.S.C. § 1092 (f); 34 CFR 668.46(e) and (g).

Link: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2011-title20/html/USCODE-2011-title20-chap28-subchapIV-partF-sec1092.htm

 

SUBJECT: Community Notification of Potential, Imminent or Active Threat to the University

NUMBER: 10:3

  1.  

 

This policy and its procedures set forth the guidelines for when and how the University provides information to the University community regarding potential, imminent and active threats to the University in compliance with the Clery Act and other applicable laws and policies.

    • Timely Warnings: Notifications to the University community that provide information on Clery Act crimes that occur on University Clery geography, are reported to campus security authorities, the University Police Department (“UPD”), or local law enforcement, and pose a serious or continuing threat to students and employees.
    • Emergency Notifications: Notifications to the University community that alert the University community to a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurring on the University campus.
    • Other Notifications: In addition to Timely Warnings and Emergency Notifications, the University, at its discretion, may provide information to the University community when an incident does not meet the threshold for a Timely Warning or an Emergency Notification.
    • The University is committed to ensuring a safe and secure campus environment for all students, employees, and visitors. To accomplish this, the University uses redundant means of communication to provide Timely Warnings, Emergency Notifications, and Other Notifications to the University community. These communications are designed to inform and direct community members to mitigate the damage of a real or potential threat to the University.
    • The University issues Timely Warnings when a situation arises, either on or near the University campus, that constitutes an ongoing or continuing threat that meets the criteria for notification as set forth in this policy, its definitions and procedures. Emergency Notifications are issued without hesitation upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to health or safety, unless the Emergency Notification will compromise efforts to assist a victim, contain the incident, or otherwise mitigate the emergency. In every case, an evaluation of the circumstances will be conducted to determine if a Timely Warning or Emergency Notification is required or if Other Notification is appropriate. Notifications will be issued and shall be continually updated until it has been determined the threat is contained or ended.
    • Decisions to issue a Timely Warning, Emergency Notification or Other Notification to the University community shall be made on a case-by-case basis dependent on the nature of the incident and the continuing danger to the campus community. In criminal cases, information will be provided to the extent possible without compromising law enforcement efforts.
    • The Chair of the Emergency Management Team, or designee, in consultation with the appropriate member(s) of the Emergency Management Team, and other University units as appropriate, is responsible for initiating Timely Warnings, Emergency Notifications, and Other Notifications to the campus community.
    • The University’s Emergency Management Team (EMT), under the direction of its Chair, is responsible for the preparation for, response to, and recovery from real or potential emergencies that affect, or may affect, the University community.
    • Individuals with information warranting a Timely Warning, Emergency Notification, or Other Notification should report circumstances to UPD.
    • The University’s emergency communication system is tested within the first two (2) weeks of the fall and spring academic semesters. These tests will be announced prior to being conducted and will contain the location of the University’s plans on emergency communications, emergency planning and response, and the evacuation of the University campus.
    • Timely Warnings
      1. When a situation is known to the University that constitutes a Clery crime within the University’s Clery geography and poses an ongoing threat to safety and security, the Chair of the Emergency Management Team, or designee, upon consultation with designated units as appropriate, will issue a Timely Warning as soon as pertinent information is available.
      2. Timely Warnings will be provided to the University community via campus-wide email and posting on the University’s webpages.
      3. Timely Warnings shall contain sufficient information about the nature of the threat to allow members of the campus community to take protective action. This information will include as appropriate: a succinct statement of the incident; possible connection to previous incidents, if applicable; date, time and location of the warning; description and drawing of any suspects, if applicable and available; and other relevant and important information.
    • Emergency Notifications
      1. In situations where an imminent or active threat to the University has been confirmed, the Chair of the Emergency Management Team, or designee, upon consultation with designated units as appropriate, will issue an Emergency Notification to the University community without delay.
      2. Emergency Notifications will be sent using the University emergency communication system, which will include notifications through email and other formats selected by the subscribers. This notification system may also include desk phones, personal and University-owned computer monitors, video display monitors, cellular phones, and text messages. Information will also be displayed on official University webpages and social media.
      3. Emergency Notifications will provide sufficient information to inform individuals of threat mitigation needs.
    • Other Notifications
      1. In situations where a Timely Warning or Emergency Notification is not warranted, the Chair of the Emergency Management Team, or designee, upon consultation with designated units as appropriate, may issue Other Notifications to the campus community in order to mitigate potential threats and assist with safety and security.
      2. Other Notifications may use email, webpage, or other formats determined by the University.
      3. Other Notifications will provide sufficient information to inform individuals of threat, safety, or security needs.
      4. Updates to the original Timely Warning, Emergency Notification, or Other Notification messaging will be issued by the Chair of the Emergency Management Team, or designee, in consultation with designated units as appropriate.
  1. Responsible Administrator

The Vice President for Technology and Security, or designee, is responsible for the ad hoc and annual review of this policy and its procedures. The University President is responsible for approval of this policy.

SOURCE: Approved by President on 02/05/15