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Division of Research & Economic Development

About the Division of Research and Economic Development

The Division of Research and Economic Development works closely with university researchers, business leaders and other sponsors to promote faculty expertise aimed at solving real-world problems in society and industry. The university has positioned itself as a leader in agriculture and precision agriculture, remote sensing and life sciences. The research enterprise also capitalizes on expertise in digital technology related to agriculture and resource management.

The precision agriculture initiative brings together experts from computer science, statistics, engineering, remote sensing and agriculture, as well as industry partners to increase the profitability and the sustainability of agriculture.

  • Research expenditures increased by more than $4 million from $63.5 million in fiscal year 2018 to $67.6 million in fiscal year 2019. This 6.5% increase moves the university closer to its Imagine 2023 goal of increasing research productivity by 40%.
  • SDSU ranked 182nd for total research and development expenditures in 2019, according to the National Science Foundation. 

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Division of Research & Economic Development News

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Megan Schulte is looking at a container of cells she is holding up

SDSU undergraduates to present child development, cancer research

Three South Dakota State University juniors will tell South Dakota legislators about their research on how children develop their relationship with the natural world and how cancer cells spread to other parts of the body.
cool-season cover crops with a shovel in the middle to show how tall they grow

Varying cover crop mixture, seeding rates may improve outcomes

A precise approach to selecting and planting cover crops that considers variability within a field will produce better results for farmers, according to South Dakota State University assistant professor Ali Mirzakhani Nafchi.

SDSU professor’s lab contributes to gene mutation discovery

A discovery more than 20 years in the making has turned the dogma that gene mutations occur randomly on its head.