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Section 3 Incident Command System

Section 3 Incident Command System

3.1       Incident Command System Overview

The National Incident Management System’s (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) are event management tools used in any size or type of emergency to manage an incident. NIMS and ICS principles include use of common terminology, modular organization, integrated communications, action planning, manageable span-of-control and comprehensive resource management. The ICS can be used by both the on-scene incident commander and at the university EOC to manage the emergency. NIMS and ICS have considerable internal flexibility and can be expanded or contracted to meet operational needs of the incident.

The first responder at the scene of an incident is the incident commander responsible for the tactical operations of first responders. Administrators do not dictate first responder actions, but EMT members, when acting in an EOC, are responsible for the general university response to the incident.

3.2       Record of Changes

The Emergency Management Specialist is responsible for distributing all revised or updated planning documents to all departments, agencies and individuals tasked in those documents.

DATE OF CHANGE

CHANGE(S) ENTERED BY

DATE ENTERED

SUMMARY OF

CHANGES

 

 

 

 

3.3       Emergency Operations Center Activation

The vice president for technology and safety, or designee, is the EMT chair and is responsible for the activation of the EOC. When the EOC is activated, members of the EMT automatically become EOC participants. As such, they have prescribed responsibilities that are listed below, along with the corresponding FEMA Essential Support Functions (ESFs).

EMT/EOC members have specific duties that are listed in this document for which they are responsible. In an emergency, not all EMT/EOC personnel may be available. Because of this, members should be prepared to handle the assigned position responsibilities of other positions.

The EMT chair, or designee, shall determine the need for and level of EOC activation. This determination will dictate the staffing of the EOC.

Most incidents that occur on a routine basis do not require EMT/EOC activation and are handled with little or no disruption to university activities. These include activities such as routine medical responses, traffic accidents and small, isolated fires and temporary interruptions of electrical power affecting a small portion of the campus. Non-routine incidents fall into various emergency levels.

3.4      Emergency Levels

South Dakota State University will use a graduated emergency response approach to managing incidents and/or disasters, these levels are called readiness conditions and consist of a four-tier system. As the potential of the incident or the demand on University resources grows, emergency response and coordination activities will increase to meet the demands. This provides a rapid method for mobilizing emergency resources. In addition, this approach is used for activating the Emergency Management Team (EMT) to the Emergency Operations Center (EOC).

Level 0 – (Normal Conditions):  Normal Conditions are defined as localized campus incidents that may quickly be resolved with internal resources and/or limited assistance from the initial responders. A level 0 may result in minor injuries to members of the campus community and may only affect a single localized area of the campus. Most normal campus operations are not disrupted. The EMT Chair would not need to be notified, unless there is the potential for the emergency to escalate. Emergency Management Team would not be activated.

  • Small Fires when the fire department is not called
  • Limited power outages involving no more than two occupied buildings. If effect building(s) are residential and then power outage must be resolved within the same evening of the outages initial occurrence.
  • Minor injury
  • False/Faulty Alarms that cause evacuation of a building.
  • Gas Smell
  • Odor Complaint

Level 1 - (Minor Incident):  A Minor Incident is defined as local event with limited impact. It does not affect the overall functional capability of the University. Planning and response is handled by normal University services. Does not pose immediate threat to life and/or property. The EMT Chair would not need to be notified immediately, unless there is the potential for the emergency to escalate. Timely notification to EMT chair is suggested.

  • Severe Weather Watch
  • Mass Gathering
  • Small localized hazardous material incidents/spills
  • Small flood with no impact to infrastructure
  • Alarm that causes an evacuation of part or all of a building.
  • Ambulance call
  • Elevator Rescue handled by University resources
  • Severe injury to a student, faculty or staff member (depending on circumstance) 
  • Injury to a member of the public on University Property
  • Missing Student (A student missing for more than 24 hours or one whose disappearance is suspicious may warrant a level 2 emergency response.)
  • Animal escape from facilities involving multiple animals and movement off university-controlled premises.
  • Unauthorized entry of individual(s) into research and teaching areas on- or off- main university with the intent to injury or damage research and teaching activities.
  • A loss of heating or cooling capacity in a residential building where sustained temperatures exceeds 90 F, or is below 50 F.

Level 2 – (Major Incident):  A Major Incident is defined as a serious event that affect an entire building and disrupt the operation of the University. Timeliness of notification is determined by the responding official immediate or as time permits. Level 2 incidents may require assistance from external organizations. These incidents may escalate quickly and have serious consequences for mission-critical functions, or may threaten life safety. EMT Chair is notified immediately and partial/full activation of the EMT.

  • Structure Fire
  • Structure collapse
  • Significant Hazardous Materials release.
  • Extensive power or utility outage involving more than two occupied buildings. If effected building(s) are residential any power outage expected to continue overnight or longer.
  • Elevator Rescue that requires Fire and/or Ambulance response
  • Severe Flooding
  • Multi-facility incident
  • External emergency that my affect University personnel or operations
  • Severe Weather Warning
  • Laboratory Fire/Explosion
  • Campus Civil Disturbance
  • Bomb Threat
  • Campus Suicide
  • Death of a student, faculty or staff member (depending on circumstance)
  • Gas Leak

Level 3 – (Disaster):  A Major disaster or imminent threat involving the entire campus and/or surrounding community. Immediate notification mandatory. Normal University operations are reduced or suspended. The effects of the emergency are wide-ranging and complex. A timely resolution of disaster conditions requires University-wide cooperation and extensive coordination with external agencies and jurisdictions. EMT activation is required to report to the Emergency Operations Center.

  • Severe Weather Event (Natural Disasters)
  • Major fire
  • Explosion
  • Major hazardous materials release
  • Terrorism incident
  • Require evacuation or shelter-in-place of several sections or entire campus buildings
  • Health epidemics
  • Hostage situation/Active shooter

Scope

Level – 0

Level – 1

Level – 2

Level – 3

University Activities

No University activities impacted

Minimal and localized. Most University activities not impacted

Significant. University activities localized shutdown

Very Significant. University activities shut down for a period of time

Impact to operations or services

None

Limited

Intermediate

Major or complete

Evacuation

None

None

Floor or Building

Multiple buildings or entire University

Participation

Department or Office Level

University response units only

Key University response units and limited outside responders

All University response units and multiple outside responders

Response

None

Limited

Intermediate

Full

Faculty, Staff and Students

Site-specific localized impact. No Injuries/No Damage

Site-specific localized impact. Injuries possible

Site specific or general impact with possible disruptions. Injuries possible

General impact with probable disruptions. Injuries and possibly fatalities are a serious concern

Media Coverage

None

None expected or limited to local coverage

Local/regional coverage

Local, regional and possible national coverage

Public & Government Concern

None

Limited

Potential exists for an embarrassing situation. Government agencies may investigate prevention, response, recovery efforts

Potential exists for an embarrassing situation and government investigation or hearing

EMT Involvement

None

Limited or none

Conditionally involved

Actively involved

Board of Regents Involvement

None

Probably none

Consulted as needed

Consulted regularly and actively involved

3.5       Communications:

A declaration of a campus emergency is an official designation intended to communicate to the University, as well as state and local officials, that the University’s normal functions and operations are interrupted and our resources are unable to meet demands resulting from the incident. Only the President or his/her designee is authorized to issue a declaration of campus emergency.

The VP of Technology and Security serves as the Chair of the Emergency Management Team. The EMT Chair will consult with the President or designee regarding the incident to assess the need for declaration of a campus emergency, in collaboration with the Incident Commander, Emergency Management, and other emergency responders, if necessary.

When the SDSU Police Department or another entity determines that an emergency exists, the University EMT Chair or designee will be contacted. The EMT Chair will notify the University President or by order of succession. If none of the above can be contacted the Chief of Police has the authority to activate the EMT to the EOC, and when an actual civil disorder is in progress and immediate action is necessary to protect persons or property from further injury or damage.

The Chief of Police and the EMT Chair will collaborate to determine the level of the emergency. The Emergency Management Specialist will be contacted prior to partial or full activation of the EMT and/or EOC or whenever the incident dictates. The emergency level will determine who on the EMT will be immediately notified or if a full activation is necessary.

3.6       Multijurisdictional Coordination

When an incident requires a tactical response the on-site incident commander is responsible for the coordination of fire, police and EMS resources. Non-tactical resources are the responsibility of the EMT/EOC members who make internal request through appropriate channels. Requests for resources not available on campus are made to the State Emergency Operations Center “SEOC” when the Center is activated. When the SEOC is not activated request for resources are made to the South Dakota Board of Regents Office in Pierre.

In emergencies where no tactical response is required, the EMT chair is the university incident commander. Internal university resources will be requested by the EMT/EOC personnel through appropriate channels. Request for resources not available on campus will be made to the State Emergency Operations Center “SEOC” when the Center is activated. When the SEOC is not activated request for resources are made to the South Dakota Board of Regents Office in Pierre  

3.7       Emergency Operations Center Support Staff

Dependent on the type and duration of an incident, additional personnel may be added to the EMT/EOC staff. These may include purchasing specialist or subject matter experts related to the incident. Additional support staff may be added to serve in a variety of roles to include scribes and runners.

3.8       Emergency Operations Center Location

SDSU has identified room 110 in the Facilities and Services Building as the primary EOC for the university.

Room 104 in Morrill Hall can also be used as an EOC with the UPD’s conference room serving as a reserve EOC. It is the responsibility of the emergency management specialist to maintain all EOCs in a state of operation readiness.

Room 110 can be expanded and contracted as needed to effectively support the management of an emergency. For example, the directors of procurement, the SDSU Alumni Association and SDSU Foundation may be added as needed.

3.9       Direction, Control and Coordination

Under the direction of the EMT chair, or designee, the overall mitigation, preparation, response and recovery activities are the responsibility of the EMT. When an emergency occurs or is likely to occur, members of the EMT transition to EOC participants. Personnel have been assigned responsibilities that align with the State of South Dakota’s Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and National Response Framework (NRF) Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) for efficient resource distribution and coordination of response and recovery operations.

ESFs are written for national level considerations: the maintenance of interstates and secondary roadways; railways; power grids; and other national considerations. SDSU uses the national level support functions as a guide for the assignment of responsibilities at the university level and added ones that apply to the university. Listed below are the ESFs as defined by the State of South Dakota EOP.

3.10     Essential Support Function (ESF) Number, Name Description

ESF #1 TRANSPORTATION: Assists federal agencies, state and local governmental entities, and voluntary organizations requiring transportation capacity to perform response missions following a major disaster or emergency.

ESF #2 COMMUNICATIONS: Ensures the provision of federal telecommunications support to federal, state and local response efforts following a presidential declared major disaster, emergency, or extraordinary situation under the Federal Response Plan (FRP).

ESF #3 PUBLIC WORKS AND ENGINEERING: Provides technical advice and evaluation, engineering services, contracting for construction management and inspection, contracting for the emergency repair of water and wastewater treatment facilities, potable water and ice, emergency power and real estate support to assist the state(s) in meeting goals related to lifesaving and life-sustaining actions, damage mitigation and recovery activities following a major disaster or emergency.

ESF #4 FIREFIGHTING: Detects and suppresses wild land, rural and urban fires resulting from, or occurring coincidentally with, a major disaster or emergency requiring federal response assistance.

ESF #5 INFORMATION AND PLANNING: Collects, analyzes, processes and disseminates information about a potential or actual disaster or emergency to facilitate the overall activities of the federal government in providing assistance to one-or-more affected states.

ESF #6 MASS CARE, EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE, TEMPORARY HOUSING AND HUMAN SERVICES: Coordinates federal assistance in support of state and local efforts to meet the mass care needs of victims of a disaster.

ESF #7 LOGISTICS, RESOURCE SUPPORT: Provides logistical and resource support to other organizations through purchasing, contract, renting and leasing equipment and supplies in a potential or actual presidential declared major disaster or emergency.

ESF #8 PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES: Provides coordinated federal assistance to supplement state and local resources in response to public health and medical care needs following a major disaster or emergency, or during a developing potential medical situation.

ESF #9 SEARCH AND RESCUE: Rapidly deploys components of the National Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) Response System to provide specialized lifesaving assistance to state and local authorities in the event of a major disaster or emergency. US&R operational activities include locating, extricating and providing on-site medical treatment to victims trapped in collapsed structures.

ESF #10 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND NATURAL RESOURCES: Provides federal support to state and local governments in response to an actual or potential discharge and/or release of hazardous materials following a major disaster or emergency.

ESF #11 AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES: Identifies, secures and arranges for the transportation of bulk food, water and ice to affected areas following a major disaster or emergency or other event requiring federal response.

ESF #12 ENERGY: Helps restore the nation’s energy systems following a major disaster, emergency or other significant event requiring federal response assistance.

In addition to these 12 ESFs used in all states, SDSU added four ESFs. They are:

ESF #13 PUBLIC SAFETY AND SECURITY: Provides assistance to local, state, tribal, territorial, insular area and federal law enforcement organizations overwhelmed by the results of an actual or anticipated natural/man-made disaster or an act of terrorism.

ESF #14 LONG-TERM RECOVERY AND MITIGATION: Supporting and building recover capacities and community planning resources of local, state and tribal governments needed to effectively plan for, manage and implement disaster recovery activities in large, unique or catastrophic incidents.

ESF #15 EXTERNAL AFFAIRS: Provides accurate, coordinated, timely and accessible information to affected audience, including governments, media, the private sector and the local populace, including children, those with disabilities and others with access and functional needs, and individuals with limited English proficiency.

ESF # 16 PROTECTION OF RESEARCH: Support research through initiatives that mitigate the impact of an emergency and protect and restore research capabilities during and after an emergency. This includes the protection of research and non-research animals owned or controlled by the university.

Below are EMT/EOC positions listed for existing SDSU departments and offices with an emergency management function as part of the EMT. Each position has a list of general emergency management responsibilities with corresponding ESFs they support. A position may support more than one ESF while most ESFs will receive support from more than one department of office.

3.11     EMT/EOC Members Responsibilities (See Section 2. EMT Members Roles and Responsibilities)

VP for Technology and Safety

Order of Succession

  1. VP of Technology and Safety
  2. AVP for Technology

This position has primary responsibility for the university’s emergency preparation and response and supports the coordination of the following ESFs:

  • ESF 1 Transportation;
  • ESF 2 Communications;
  • ESF 3 Public Works and Engineering;
  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 6 Mass Care, Emergency Assistance, Temporary Housing and Human Services;
  • ESF 7 Logistics, Resource Support;
  • ESF 8 Public Health and Medical Services;
  • ESF 10 Hazardous Materials and Natural Resources;
  • ESF 12 Energy;
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Recovery and Mitigation;
  • ESF 15 External Affairs; and
  • ESF 16 Protection of Research.

AVP for Technology

Order of Succession

  1. AVP for Technology
  2. Communications Network Analyst

 This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 2 Communications;
  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Recovery and Mitigation; and
  • ESF 15 External Affairs.

Emergency Management Specialist

Order of Succession

  1. Emergency Management Specialist

This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 2 Communications;
  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 8 Public Health and Medical Services;
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Recovery and Mitigation; and
  • ESF 15 External Affairs.

VP for Finance & Administration

Order of Succession

1.   VP for Finance & Administration

2.   Director of Business and Auxiliary Services

 This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 1 Transportation;
  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 7 Logistics, Resource Support;
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Recovery and Mitigation; and
  • ESF 15 External Affairs.

AVP for Facilities and Services

Order of Succession

1.   AVP for Facilities and Services

2.   Director of Campus Maintenance

This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 1 Transportation;
  • ESF 3 Public Works and Engineering;
  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 6 Mass care, Emergency Assistance, Temporary Housing and Human Services;
  • ESF 7 Logistics, Resource Support;
  • ESF 10 Hazardous Materials and Natural Resources;
  • ESF 11 Agriculture and Natural Resources;
  • ESF 12 Energy;
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Recovery and Mitigation; and
  • ESF 16 Protection of Research.

VP of Student Affairs

Order of Succession

1.   VP of Student Affairs

2.   AVP of Student Affairs

3.   Dean of Students

This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 6 Mass Care, Emergency Assistance, Temporary Housing and Human Services;
  • ESF 7 Logistics, Resource Support;
  • ESF 8 Public Health and Medical Services;
  • ESF 11 Agriculture and Natural Resources;
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Recovery and Mitigation; and
  • ESF 15 External Affairs.

Director of Residential Life and Housing

Order of Succession

1.   Director of Residential Life and Housing

2.   Assistant Director of Residential Life and Housing

This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 6 Mass Care, Emergency Assistance, Temporary Housing and Human Services;
  • ESF 7 Logistics, Resource Support;
  • ESF 8 Public Health and Medical Services;
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Mitigation and Recovery; and
  • ESF 15 External Affairs.

Director of University Marketing and Communications

Order of Succession

1.  Director of University Marketing and Communications

2.  Strategic Communications Manager

3.  Senior News Editor and Media Relations Coordinator

This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 2 Communications;
  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Mitigation and Recovery; and
  • ESF 15 External Affairs.

Chief of Police

Order of Succession

1.         Chief of Police

2.         Deputy Chief of Police

3.         Administrative Sergeant

This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 1 Transportation;
  • ESF 2 Communications;
  • ESF 4 Firefighting;
  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 6 Mass Care, Emergency Assistance, Temporary Housing and Human Services;
  • ESF 8 Public Health and Medical Services;
  • ESF 9 Search and Rescue;
  • ESF 10 Hazardous Materials and Natural Resources; and
  • ESF 13 Public Safety and Security.

VP for Research and Economic Development

Order of Succession

1.         VP for Research and Economic Development

2.         AVP for Research Assurance and Sponsored Programs

This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 5 Information and Planning;
  • ESF 8 Public Health and Medical Services;
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Recovery and Mitigation; and
  • ESF 16 Protection of Research.

University Counsel

This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 5 Information and Planning; and
  • ESF 15 External Affairs.

Others may be added as ad hoc members. Examples include:

Assistant to the Provost

Order of Succession

  1. Assistant to the Provost

This position supports the following ESFs: 

  • ESF 2 Communications
  • ESF 5 Information and Planning
  • ESF 14 Long-Term Recovery and Mitigation;
  • ESF 15 External Affairs

Director of Procurement/Risk Management

Order of Succession

1.         Director-Business & Auxiliary Operations

2.         Purchasing Agent

This position supports the following ESFs:

  • ESF 7 Logistics, Resource Support; and
  • ESP 14 Long-Term Recovery and Mitigation.

3.12 Emergency Contact Information

The EMT chair designates the emergency management specialist as the person responsible for maintaining the up to-date list of EMT members. An updated contact list is maintained in the Appendix A.

The accuracy of this information will be confirmed at least every six months and the current information will be distributed to the EMT members and to the UPD dispatchers.

EMT members are responsible for keeping this information accessible and to notify the emergency management specialist of any changes in their contact information.