Skip to main content

Heart Shaped Bee

I don’t know about you, but we’ve been seeing a LOT of bees around here lately – which is a good thing!  Bees are pollinators, which means they help pollinate flowers and crops by traveling from plant to plant.  This is very important, because without pollination, plants can’t produce what they need to, like fruits and vegetables.  Last week, we read a book for Thinking Thursday about pollinators called “Give Bees a Chance” by Bethany Barton, and that inspired me to teach you how to make a craft to show just how much we love bees!

Find a helpful how-to video below:

 

Heart shaped bee craft example

Materials

  • Yellow, Black, and White Construction Paper or Cardstock
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Black Marker

Instructions

  1. Cut the following out of your paper using your scissors:
    1. White: cut one heart out (this will be the background of your project and will serve as bee wings when finished).
    2. Yellow: cut one heart out that is the same size as your white heart.  When finished, cut off the top so it looks like an ice cream cone (this part will be your bee body).
    3. Black: cut ½ inch wide strips (these will be your bee stripes, so cut enough for your bee body).  In addition, cut two ¼ inch wide strips and two small hearts (these will be your antenna).
  2. Glue a small black heart to the end of an antenna.  Repeat with the other heart and antenna, then glue your finished antenna on the back of your yellow bee body.
  3. Glue your yellow bee body on your white heart so the bottoms of the heart line up.  You can now see that the top of the white heart looks like bee wings!
  4. Glue your ½ inch black strips on your bee body to make stripes.  Use your scissors to trim ends off.
  5. Use a black marker to add facial features like two eyes and a mouth.

 

Make-It Monday projects will be posted each Monday (except for holidays) throughout the museum closure for COVID-19.  For a full list of previous projects, visit our Make-It Monday website.

Questions? Contact Sarah, the museum's education coordinator.