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American Indian Opportunities at SDSU


 

 

 

 


Be Great. Start Here.®

Welcome to South Dakota State University!

Through a variety of academic programs, scholarships, student services and initiatives, South Dakota State University seeks to create a welcoming and supportive campus environment for American Indian students.

Barry Dunn with
Wokini Initiative

The Wokini Initiative is SDSU’s collaborative and holistic framework to support American Indian student success and Indigenous Nation-building. 

Learn more about Wokini

Val and a student at NANEC
Native American Nursing Education Center

The College of Nursing Native American Nursing Education Center (NANEC) is committed to providing a welcoming and supportive place for students.

VISIT NANEC

AISC lobby
American Indian Student Center

The AISC is committed to providing a welcome home-place to support those who have courageously chosen to walk the path of higher education.

Visit AISC

 

Experience everything that SDState can offer.

Land Acknowledgement

South Dakota State University acknowledges the land it occupies across South Dakota is the ancestral, traditional and contemporary lands of the Oceti Sakowin [oh-CHEH-tee shaw-KOHwe], meaning Seven Council Fires, which is the proper name for the people referred to as Sioux. We acknowledge that before these sites were named South Dakota State University, they were called home by the people of American Indian Nations indigenous to this region. The tribal alliance made up of individual bands of the Seven Council Fires is based on kinship, location and dialects: Santee-Dakota, Yankton-Nakota and Teton-Lakota. We acknowledge the sovereignty of the nine federally recognized Native Nations in South Dakota: Cheyenne River, Crow Creek, Flandreau Santee, Lower Brule, Oglala, Rosebud, Sisseton-Wahpeton, Standing Rock and Yankton Sioux Tribes. As a land-grant university, it is our mission to provide access to higher education to all. We are committed to building respectful and positive relationships with indigenous communities through academic pursuits, partnerships, historical recognitions, extension programs and enrollment efforts.

American Indian Opportunities at SDSU News

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Bev Warne laughs during her interview with Elevate.

The power of mentors

At only 9 years old, Bev (Stabber) Warne was walking down Rapid City’s Main Street and read a sign: “No Indians Allowed.” She did not understand why she and her family would be treated in such a way. “I grew curious about why people would view me so differently,” Bev explains.