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Research

Capping material helps alum inactivate phosphorus in lake water

Doctoral student Sepideh Sadeghi and instructor Kyungnan Min agitate the water in the column to simulate a boat passing by.
Doctoral student Sepideh Sadeghi and instructor Kyungnan Min agitate the water in the column to simulate a boat passing by.

PI's: 

Paul Lorenzen,  Department of Environment and Natural   Resources.

Kyungnan Min,  Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Students: 

Doctoral student Sepideh Sadeghi

Most South Dakota lakes are phosphorus-rich. Efforts to use aluminum sulfate, a coagulant which binds phosphorus forming flocs that settles to the bottom of the lake, have produced only short-term results. Alum-capping material combinations have helped the floc settle to the bottom, resist turbulence and prevent re-suspension better than alum alone.

 

 

 


Duckweed absorbs nutrients, provides protein for animal feed

duckweed
Duckweed

A tiny aquatic plant called duckweed might help remove contaminants from ponds and slow-moving water bodies and then could be harvested and incorporated into animal feed.

PI's: 

Roger Foote, coordinator for the Upper Big Sioux River Watershed Project       

Lin Wei of the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

 

 

 


Understanding E. coli behavior important for improving water quality

Understanding how E. coli behave in streams will help scientists determine how to reduce high bacteria counts in waterways.

Master’s student Louis Amegbletor removes a filter that collects bacteria.
Master’s student Louis Amegbletor removes a filter that collects bacteria.

PI's:

Rachel McDaniel, Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, 

Bruce Bleakley, Department of Biology and Microbiology

Students: 

Louis Amegbletor

Sadia Salam