Water Resources Institute

Water Resources Institute

Who We Are

The South Dakota Water Resources Institute (WRI) at South Dakota State University provides leadership on evolving water concerns and problems being faced by South Dakota citizens through research, educational opportunities for students and professionals, and community outreach.

The Institute is a federal–state partnership which:

  • plans, facilitates, and conducts research to aid in the resolution of State and regional water problems;
  • provides for the training and education of scientists and engineers through their participation in research and outreach;
  • promotes technology transfer and the dissemination and application of water related information; and
  • provides for competitive grants for students and researchers.

Authorized by Congress as one of the nation’s 54 water resources research institutes, we also connect the research expertise at South Dakota State University to water-related problems at the local, regional or national level. The Institute is affiliated with the university’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences, Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering and the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. 

The Water Resources Institute is co-located with the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in the Agricultural Engineering building, office 211 on the South Dakota State University campus in Brookings, SD.

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Water Resources Institute News

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Underwater drone expands water quality testing capabilities

An underwater drone capable of carrying seven sensors and taking leaf and soil samples is increasing research capabilities at the South Dakota Water Resources Institute.

Bergstrom explaining designs on wall

SDSU landscape architects use ‘green’ approach to reduce runoff

Four faculty researchers in SDSU’s School of Design are figuring out how small rural cities, such as Brookings, can integrate green infrastructure into the existing landscape to manage runoff—and, in the long run, help relieve pressure on the city drainage system.

New model to predict weather for S.D. climate divisions

Mike Gillispie, a senior service hydrologist at the National Weather Service in Sioux Falls, is working on a statistical model that will predict departures from normal temperature and precipitation levels for each of the nine climate divisions in South Dakota.