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AISC Grand Opening Symposium

AISC Gran Opening Celebration

AISC Grand Opening Symposium

April 15-16, 2021

VIRTUAL Conference with limited in-person participation
in Honor of the Grand Opening of the American Indian Student Center
South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA

South Dakota State University’s Wokini Initiative, School of American and Global Studies, and American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program invite submissions to the 2021 Indigenizing Spaces: American Indian and Indigenous Student Success Symposium, in Brookings, SD, lands indigenous to the Santee, or Dakota peoples. We acknowledge the human and other than human relationships of this place among the Oceti Sakowin, the Seven Council Fires of the Lakota, Nakota, and Dakota peoples as we invite our relatives, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, to these lands to address the role of Indigenous peoples, knowledge and research in higher education. We ask all who visit to tread with respect for the revitalization of Indigenous cultures, rooted in futurity, grounded in tradition and enacted in the present.

Presentation Proposal Workshop — January 9 and 13, 2021

Saturday, Jan. 9 and Wednesday, Jan. 13; 12-5 p.m.

12-1 p.m. — Optional Informal session on the American Indian Student Center and our themes for the symposium.

1-5 p.m. — Drop in any time to ask questions and have members of the symposium sub-committee help you craft a presentation proposal.

Join through Zoom

Call For Proposals — Deadline February 15, 2021

In conceptualizing what home means for Indigenous students in higher education, we are considering questions including, but not limited to the following:  

  • What structures need to be in place for Indigenous students to succeed in higher education? In K-12 education?
  • How can Indigenous cultural production, such as narrative, story, literature, oral history, plastic arts, music, games and sport, become more central in institutions of higher learning?
  • How can Indigenous knowledge production inform each corner of K-12 and/or higher education? 

Submit Proposals to School of American and Global Studies

Possible topics related to the symposium theme (home/space/language):

  • How does Indigenous language revitalization inform our goals for student success?
  • What role does Indigenous language revitalization take in student success? What are the benchmarks?
  • If we ground ourselves in Indigenous knowledge, what goals do we have for student success?  How do we define student success in relationship to Indigenous nation building?
  • Is it space? Is it people? Family? Language? Relationships? Community? Land?
  • What does home look like in higher education for Indigenous students?
  • How do we build family at the university?
  • How might institutions facilitate the process of home or home-building?
  • How do we institutionalize home for indigenous students (in their homeland)?
  • How do we write and implement policy that encourages home, promotes cultural integrity, while fostering and protecting kinship and community (e.g. smudging, data sovereignty, protecting cultural relevancies such as sharing food on campus)?
  • How do we bridge or live in the collaborative space between student affairs and academics? And how does that space lend itself to student success?
  • How do we theorize space? Why a building?
  • How do we ensure cultural responsiveness in other areas/spaces of campus (beyond a student center)?
  • How does Indigenous language revitalization inform our goals for student success?  
  • What role does Indigenous language revitalization take in student success? What are the benchmarks?
  • If we ground ourselves in Indigenous knowledge, what goals do we have for student success? 
  • How do we define student success in relationship to Indigenous nation building? 

Proposal guidelines: 
Presentation Types: The Program Committee seeks conference proposals for individual presentations (15-20 minutes) or for entire panels (60 minutes). Please indicate submission type: individual paper, panel session (all presenters/abstracts should be included), roundtable, poster or creative work/film screening. Please indicate your preference for virtual or in-person. (In-person participants will be notified with ample time to arrange travel).
 
Proposal Format: Proposals should be 250-word maximum for individual presenters or 750 for panels and roundtables. Include a title, as well as the following information: name of presenter(s), school, community, or organization affiliation(s), email address, and AV needs.  

Keywords: Proposals should list four to five keywords that describe the presentation (e.g., home, student affairs, language revitalization or smudging policy). 

We welcome proposals from faculty, staff and students in colleges, universities and tribal colleges; community-based scholars and Elders; community leaders and advocates; and professionals working in any field. We encourage proposals relating to Indigenous and intercultural community-driven programming, scholarship and/or artistic expression. Proposals can be submitted for the following formats: Individual papers, panel sessions, roundtables, posters or creative works/film screenings. The deadline for proposals is Monday, February 15, 2021, 11:59 p.m. CST. Applicants will be notified on a rolling basis, no later than March 15, 2021.

Keynote Address – April 15, 2021, 7 p.m.
Keene, Adrienne

Dr. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee Nation), is Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies at Brown University, awardee of the Wisteria Fund for her podcast, All My Relations, and author of the upcoming book, College Pride, Native Pride: Building Indigenous Futures Through Higher Education (UMN Press). Dr. Keene graduated with a B.A. in Cultural and Social Anthropology; Native American Studies, from Stanford University, and an Ed.M. and Ed.D. from Harvard University. The podcast, All My Relations, that she and Matika Wilbur (Swinomish and Talalip) co-host, has won several awards such as “Best Podcasts 2019” (Marie Claire Magazine) and “Best Podcasts on Race and History” (Fortune Magazine). In addition to several publications in academic journals, Dr. Keene has published numerous national press articles including, “Advice for Non-Indigenous instructors of Native Studies” (Indian Country Today), and “Colorado State University Tour Incident is Nothing New for Native Students” (Teen Vogue). Dr. Keene will open the 2021 Indigenizing Spaces: American Indian and Indigenous Student Success Symposium with a discussion rooted in her research areas of college access for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students, including the role of pre-college access programs in student success.

Land Acknowledgement:

South Dakota State University acknowledges the land it occupies across South Dakota is the ancestral, traditional and contemporary lands of the Oceti Sakowin [oh-CHEH-tee shaw-KOHwe], meaning Seven Council Fires, which is the proper name for the people referred to as Sioux. We acknowledge that before these sites were named South Dakota State University, they were called home by the people of American Indian Nations indigenous to this region. The tribal alliance made up of individual bands of the Seven Council Fires is based on kinship, location and dialects: Santee-Dakota, Yankton-Nakota and Teton-Lakota. We acknowledge the sovereignty of the nine federally recognized Native Nations in South Dakota: Cheyenne River, Crow Creek, Flandreau Santee, Lower Brule, Oglala, Rosebud, Sisseton-Wahpeton, Standing Rock and Yankton Sioux Tribes. As a land-grant university, it is our mission to provide access to higher education to all. We are committed to building respectful and positive relationships with indigenous communities through academic pursuits, partnerships, historical recognitions, extension programs and enrollment efforts.