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Faculty publish manuscripts on harm reduction and postoperative pancreatic fistula

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Several faculty from the Department of Allied and Population Health have published manuscripts in the Fall 2022 semester. Dr. Chris Robbins co-authored a manuscript related to postoperative pancreatic fistula following traumatic splenectomy, and a team from the Community Practice Innovation Center (CPIC) have published a manuscript on harm reduction strategies implemented through the START-SD project.

Christopher Robbins
Dr. Chris Robbins

Robbins served as co-author for a manuscript that was published in the Journal of Surgical Research. The manuscript, which is titled “Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula Following Traumatic Splenectomy: A Morbid and Costly Complication,” examines whether the use of sutures instead of staples in splenic hilum ligation would reduce the rate of postoperative pancreatic fistula (CR-POPF) in adult splenectomies.

In the study, 278 cases were examined and no statistically significant difference was found, however the team discovered that rate of CR-POPF developing in splenectomies after trauma was at 5%, rather than the previous institutional norm, which was 1%-3%. The team also recommended further study to determine an optimal technique for emergent splenectomy.

Dr. Robbins joined the Allied and Population Health team in January of 2022. His manuscript on postoperative pancreatic fistula reports on work he completed before coming to SDSU. Upon joining the department and the CPIC team, he was added to a number of ongoing projects, including START-SD.

START-SD is a two-pronged project that is focused on working to increase access to and effectiveness of prevention, treatment, and recovery services for substance use disorders in South Dakota. The first prong of the project address opioid use disorder in South Dakota and the second prong addresses psychostimulant use disorder in the state. Once key aspect of prevention, treatment, and recovery of substance use disorders is harm reduction.

Seven SDSU faculty from the START-SD project team have authored a manuscript on the harm reduction strategies implemented through START-SD, which has been published in the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association.

START SD logo
Logo for the START-SD project

“Harm reduction is a key component of the Overdose Prevention Strategy developed by the Department of Health and Human Services with a goal of promoting health and reducing the negative consequences of drug use such as drug-related deaths, risk of infection related to unsterile injections, and stigma associated with substance use disorders,” according to the publication.

Dr. Erin Miller, Dr. Robbins, Dr. Jennifer Ball, and Dr. Jeremy Daniel from the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, Dr. Mary Emery and Dr. Patricia Ahmed from the School of Psychology, Sociology, and Rural Studies, and Dr. Aaron Hunt, the former coordinator of SDSU’s Public Health program, each contributed to the article, which is titled “Promoting harm reduction in rural South Dakota using an interdisciplinary consortium.”

The article “Describes harm reduction and prevention activities implemented through START-SD to reduce the impact of SUD in South Dakota,” including establishing an interdisciplinary consortium and advisory board, establishing partnerships, increasing access to programs, facilitating educational activities and trainings, and working to reduce stigma.

Faculty in the department of Allied and Population Health have a strong track record of publishing manuscripts reporting on the work they’ve done to improve the health of South Dakotans. Click here to learn more about department. 

Click here read the manuscript, “Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula Following Traumatic Splenectomy: A Morbid and Costly Complication.” 

Click here to read the manuscript, “Promoting harm reduction in rural South Dakota using an interdisciplinary consortium.”