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Karabon named Wendell and Marlys Thompson Director of the School of Education, Counseling and Human Development

Anna Karabon has been named the Wendell and Marlys Thompson Director of the School of Education, Counseling and Human Development
Anne Karabon

South Dakota State University College of Education and Human Sciences Dean Paul Barnes announced today Anne Karabon has accepted the position of director of the School of Education, Counseling and Human Development. Karabon comes to SDSU from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where she has served as an associate professor in the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences. Karabon will start at SDSU July 22.
 
“We are excited to welcome Anne Karabon as the first recipient of the Wendell and Marlys Thompson Director of the School of Education, Counseling and Human Development," Barnes said. "Her exceptional experience and passion in early childhood education, STEM, human development, special education and mental health make her the right fit to support and advance our already successful programs in the school.

"We owe a great deal to Wendell and Marlys Thompson, whose vision and investment allowed us to bring such a high-caliber leader to SDSU," Barnes continued.

Karabon earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Her doctorate was earned at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, with specialization in early childhood education and qualitative methods.
 
About the Thompsons
Wendell Thompson ’68 grew up on a farm near Winfred, and Marlys ’70 grew up on a farm near Westbrook, Minnesota. The first-generation college students graduated from SDSU with majors in economics and psychology, respectively. Wendell established a real estate firm, and Marlys had a 22-year teaching career at both the Brookings Middle School and Central Elementary.
 
When the Thompsons’ family and extended family were touched by mental health care needs, they signed up for National Alliance on Mental Illness classes in Brookings and joined the newly formed Brookings Empowerment Project in order to learn and offer services. They saw the need for high-quality, accessible mental health services for students, families, farmers, veterans and others throughout the state. They became acutely aware that those living in rural areas do not have the same services as did their own relatives living in urban settings.
 
The Thompsons hope this funding source will be able to garner the attention of qualified leaders and scholars befitting of the serious and important work in the School of Education, Counseling and Human Development and that SDSU will become the preferred partner for those committed to mental health, education and family wellness.