Skip to main content
Menu
Close Search

Pedestrian Corridors

Campus streets, parking lots and walkways form an interconnected network for campus circulation. This circulation system should be safe and efficient with equal consideration for pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles.

Pedestrian Circulation

The quality of the pedestrian corridors and outdoor spaces on campus contributes to the university's ability to attract and retain the best students, faculty and staff. Campus pedestrian corridors should facilitate a safe and enjoyable experience and should encourage social interaction on campus. Sidewalks should provide practical links to buildings, parking lots and outdoor spaces. The pedestrian corridors should be designed with features that complement the campus architecture and create a unique atmosphere. Major sidewalks should terminate at the campus limits with well-defined pedestrian gateways.

Bicycle Circulation

Bicycle traffic has a significant presence on the campus. The university supports the use of bicycles on campus as part of its goal to encourage healthy living and sustainability. Bicycle use and parking will be considered in the development of campus improvement projects. Street intersections will be designed to provide well-defined crossings. Major pedestrian corridors will be constructed with sidewalks of sufficient width to accommodate the safe coexistence of bikers and pedestrians.

A campus bicycle-use policy will be developed in conjunction with the infrastructure to better accommodate bicycle traffic. The policy encouraging bicycle use will note the importance of safety and convenience for bicyclists.

Community Connections

The campus establishes a sense of a university community. It also is an integral component of the Brookings community, particularly its retail, housing and recreation sectors. Collaborations with the city of Brookings nurture a shared vision for community growth. Planning for vehicular and pedestrian connections extend beyond the defined campus and engage and impact development in the broader community.