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Spring 2020 Semester

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

Composition courses that offer many sections (ENGL 101, 201, 277, and 279) are not listed on this schedule unless they are tailored to specific thematic content or particularly appropriate for specific programs and majors.

  • 100-200 level

ENGL 201.S17 Honors Composition II: Writing to Change the World

TR 12:30-1:45PM 

Dr. Katherine Malone

So what? Who cares? If we want to change people’s minds, we have to show them why our claims matter. In this course, you will hone your critical thinking, writing, and research skills to argue effectively about issues that matter to you. Our course texts will address topics including civil rights, social class and education, the environment, and the responsibilities of citizenship. By considering how authors from a range of historical periods and cultures have challenged the status quo, you will develop skills for analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing complex ideas and arguments. Through our discussions, research, and writing assignments, you will become a more effective and persuasive writer who is ready to argue for a change you want to see in the world.

ENGL 201.ST1 and ST2 Composition II: Science and Environment

Internet

Lisa Madsen

This is an online section designed for students who have interest in or are majoring in the natural sciences.

This course builds upon those reading and writing competencies you acquired in English 101 by developing further your ability to conduct research and to structure and extend an argument. This course features science and the environment as a broad theme, with inquiries into research, literature, and ethics. Course readings will introduce issues of global climate change, representations of science within the media, cultural and individual land ethic, and the relationships of humans to our environments. Through class discussion, short writing assignments, extensive research, and three formal essays you will learn to explore these issues and to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize key ideas as a means of advancing your own. In addition, you will learn to pose a problem worth investigating, to develop and sustain an arguable thesis, and to support your ideas with textual evidence—and thereby to contribute to informed conversations within the academy and the broader culture.

ENGL 201.S04 Composition II: Sports Writing

M-W-F 10:00am-10:50am

ENGL 201.ST4 Composition II: Sports Writing

Internet

Amber Jensen

This course will focus on the study of and practice in writing persuasive prose, with the aim to improve writing skills in all disciplines. Students will read selections from The Best American Sports Writing as examples of research-driven, persuasive prose and will analyze the rhetorical choices the author of each text makes and how those choices enhance argument and purpose. This reading and analysis will inform students' own rhetorical choices as they write their own research-driven, persuasive essays. Throughout the writing process, students will also create an annotated bibliography and write two reflective narratives that encourage reflection on their learning and writing so that students leave the course with a deepened understanding of the process of research and writing and the rhetorical choices they will make as writers in their future personal and professional writing.

ENGL 201.S03 Composition II: Environmental Writing

MWF 9:00-9:50

Gwen Horsley

English 201 will help students develop the ability to think critically and analytically and to write effectively for other university courses and careers. This course will provide opportunities to develop analytical skills that will help students become critical readers and effective writers. Specifically, in this class, students will (1) focus on the relationships between world environments, land, animals and humankind; (2) read various essays by environmental, conservational, and regional authors; and (3) produce student writings. Students will improve their writing skills by reading essays and applying techniques they witness in others’ work and those learned in class. This class is also a course in logical and creative thought. Students will write about man’s place in the world and our influence on the land and animals, a place that holds special meaning to them or has influenced their lives, and record a story of their own families and their places and passions in the world. Students will practice writing in an informed and persuasive manner, in language that engages and enlivens readers by using vivid verbs and avoiding unnecessary passives, nominalizations, and expletive constructions.

Students will prepare writing assignments based on readings and discussions of essays included in Literature and the Environment and other sources. They will use The St. Martin’s Handbook to review grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and usage as needed

LING 203.S01 English Grammar

MWF 1:00-1:50

Dr. Nathan Serfling

The South Dakota State University Undergraduate Catalog describes LING 203 as consisting of “[i]nstruction in the theory and practice of traditional grammar including the study of parts of speech, parsing, and practical problems in usage.”

“Grammar” is a mercurial term, though. Typically, we think of it to mean “correct” sentence structure, and, indeed, that is one of its meanings. But Merriam-Webster reminds us “grammar” also refers to “the principles or rules of an art, science, or technique,” taking it beyond the confines of syntactic structures. Grammar also evolves as a concept and in practice, and scholars and educators in the field of English studies debate the definition and nature of grammar, including how well its explicit instruction improves students’ writing. In this course, we will use the differing sensibilities, definitions, and fluctuations regarding grammar to guide our work. We will examine the parts of speech, address syntactic structures and functions, and parse and diagram sentences. We will also explore definitions of and debates about grammar. All of this will occur in units about 1) the rules and structures of grammar; 2) the application of grammar rhetorically/stylistically; and 3) the debates surrounding various aspects of grammar, including, but not limited to, its instruction.

ENGL 210.ST1 Introduction to Literature

Internet

Lynn Hublou

Readings in fiction, drama, and poetry to acquaint students with literature and aesthetic form. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. Notes: Course meets SGR #4 or IGR #3.

ENGL 222.S01 British Literature II

TR 9:30-19:45AM

Dr. Katherine Malone

This survey of British literature will introduce you to key authors, texts, genres, and debates from the late-eighteenth century to the present. We’ll discuss literary works in the context of cultural forces including war, industrialization, empire, democracy, individualism, and changing attitudes about race, class, and gender. As we make our way through the Romantic, Victorian, modern, and postmodern eras, we’ll read writers’ manifestos and literary criticism to consider how the role of the artist and the purpose of art have been defined over two tumultuous centuries. Our class meetings will consist of lecture, discussion, and student presentations. Our assignments—exams, essays, and a final creative project—will help you develop critical reading and writing skills and enhance your appreciation of the history and functions of literature.

ENGL 240.ST2 Juvenile Literature: Elementary-5th Grade

Internet

Randi L Anderson

Juvenile Literature is a literature course in which students will develop the skills to interpret and evaluate various genres of literature for juvenile readers. This particular section will use Robert Scholes’ concept of “Textual Power” to aid in our reading, interpretation, and criticism of various works of literature at approximately the K-5 grade level. We will read a large range of literary works as well as information on the history, development, and genre of juvenile literature.

Readings for this course include works such as Brown Girl Dreaming, Hatchet, The Secret Garden, Alvin Ho, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Strom in the Barn, and a variety of picture books. These readings will be paired with chapters from Reading Children’s Literature: A Critical Introduction to help develop understanding of various genres, themes, and concepts related to juvenile literature, and present in our readings.

In addition to exposing students to various genres of writing (poetry, historical fiction, non-fiction, fantasy, picture books, graphic novels, etc.) this course will also allow students to engage in discussion of larger themes present in these works such as censorship, race, and gender.

Students’ understanding of these works and concepts will be developed through readings, research, discussion posts, exams, and writing assignments designed to get students to practice analyzing poetry, picture books, informational books, and transitional/easy readers.

ENGL 240.ST1 Juvenile Literature: Elementary-5th Grade 

Internet

April Myrick

A survey of the history of literature written for children and adolescents, and a consideration of the various types of juvenile literature. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.

ENGL 242.S01 American Literature II

TTH 1:30-3:45 PM

Dr. Paul Baggett

This course surveys a range of U.S. literatures from about 1865 to 1965, writings that treat the end of slavery and the development of a segregated America, increasingly urbanized and industrialized U.S. landscapes, waves of immigration, and the fulfilled promise of “America” as imperial nation. The class will explore the diversity of identities represented during that time, and the problems/potentials writers imagined in response to the century’s changes—especially literature’s critical power in a time of nation building. This survey will require heavy reading, active class participation, two short papers, a midterm, and a final.

Required Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Ninth Edition. Volumes C, D, and E (Package 2, ISBN: 978-0-393-26455-5).

 

ENGL 283.S01  Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 1:00-1:50PM

Prof. Steven Wingate

Students will explore the various forms of creative writing (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama) not one at a time in a survey format—as if there were decisive walls of separation between then—but as intensely related genres that share much of their creative DNA. Through close reading and work on personal texts, students will address the decisions that writers in any genre must face on voice, rhetorical position, relationship to audience, etc. Students will produce and revise portfolios of original creative work developed from prompts and research. This course fulfills the same SGR #2 requirement as ENGL 201; note that the course will involve creative research projects. Successful completion of ENGL 101 (by coursework, testing, or equivalency) is a prerequisite.  

ENGL 284.S01 Introduction to Criticism

MWF 12:00-12:50PM

Dr. Nicole Flynn

In this course, you will learn about the history of literary and cultural criticism, study and practice different approaches and methodologies to reading and writing about texts, and produce critical work of your own. This course is designed to continue your introduction to the field of English and further develop your interpretive skills. Our textbook Literary Theory and Criticism: An Introduction, presents an historical narrative of movements important to English Studies, explains and explores the connections between literary theories. We will discover new ways of approaching literature and put those ideas into practice through discussion and writing. 

  • 300-level

ENGL 343.S01 J. R. R. Tolkien: Before and Beyond His Rings

W 6:00-8:50PM

Dr. M. Nagy

J. R. R. Tolkien draws upon an imposing array of ancient languages, literatures, prosodic forms, and styles in order to construct both Middle Earth and those who inhabit it. Yet, despite Tolkien’s rather daunting range, his works nevertheless entertain rather than intimidate the reader for they seamlessly blend history and mythology, fact and fantasy, and philosophy and philology into labyrinthine tales of remote lands, times, and peoples, ones whose darker sides often seem disturbingly modern and familiar.

This course will introduce students to select Old English, Middle English, and Old Norse texts (all in translation), and examine The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings in light of these earlier works. Further, in addition to the required reading for this course, students will also participate in the Tolkien Film Festival sponsored by the Department of English. This will afford them the opportunity to explore, and perhaps write their papers about, the adaptation of Tolkien’s written word into an alternative medium. Various themes we’ll cover include cultural relativity; the origin and nature of evil; religion and its fairytale and folktale motifs; philology; the use and abuse of power; ecological theory; mythology and the modern day; and the corruptions and continuities of language, to name a few.

Texts:

  • The Anglo-Saxon World: An Anthology. Trans. Kevin Crossley-Holland. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1999.
  • The Saga of the Volsungs. Trans. Jesse L. Byock. London: Penguin, 1999.
  • Tolkien, J. R. R. The Hobbit. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.
  • —. The Lord of the Rings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.
  • —. The Tolkien Reader. New York: Ballantine Books, 1966
  • Jackson, Peter. All three LotR Films.

 

ENGL 379.S11  Technical Communication for Biology Majors  

TR 12:30-1:45

April Myrick 

This section of English 379 is the second of a sequence for Biology and Microbiology students. In this course, students will devote a significant portion of the semester analyzing and organizing their BIOL490 research for writing and presentation via a number of platforms and mediums (such as scholarly journal article, traditional presentation, informative poster, and multimedia) and for both technical and lay audiences. 

 

ENGL 379.S04  Technical Communication for Economics Majors

TR 11:00-12:15

April Myrick 

In this section of English 379, students will prepare a variety of workplace/business-related documents (such as a memo, cover letter & resume, white paper, and recommendation report) and presentations for both technical and lay audiences.

While the course is broadly designed for Econ majors, it is open to all majors, especially those with an interest in business and economics.

 

ENGL 383.S01 Creative Writing I

MWF 2:00-2:50PM

Dr. Christine Stewart

Dr. Stewart’s Creative Writing I, or “The World of the Real Writer,” focuses on strengthening poetry, creative nonfiction, and/or fiction writing skills by developing longer/more complex projects. Through the processes of writing and revising creative texts, the class helps students learn more craft concepts and develop more sophisticated applications for them. Large-group workshop sessions will challenge students to expand and strengthen their practice of peer response. Students will also self-select texts to read as a writer and use to contextualize their creative work. Finally, reading submissions for a state-wide poetry and prose contest will give them real-world editing experience.

ENGL 383 differs from ENGL 283 in that it does not fulfill an IGR or SGR credit. Because it primarily draws majors from English and affiliated fields, it focuses on the relationship between creative work and the study of literature. While research-based projects are welcome, they are not required.

Required texts:

  • Sellers, Heather. The Practice of Creative Writing, 3rd edition       
  • One contemporary mentor text of the student’s choice.
  • Student work
  • 400-level

ENGL 491: Independent Study: Undergraduate Peer Tutoring

TTH 8:30-9:45

Dr. Nathan Serfling

Since their beginnings in the 1920s and 30s, writing centers have come to serve numerous functions: as hubs for writing across the curriculum initiatives, sites to develop and deliver workshops, and resource centers for faculty as well as students, among other functions. But the primary function of writing centers has necessarily and rightfully remained the tutoring of student writers. This course will immerse you in that function in two parts. During the first four weeks, you will explore writing center praxis--that is, the dialogic interplay of theory and practice related to writing center work. This part of the course will orient you to writing center history, key theoretical tenets, and practical aspects of writing center tutoring. Once we have developed and practiced this foundation, you will begin work in the writing center as tutors, responsible for assisting a wide variety of student clients with numerous writing tasks. Through this work, you will learn to actively engage with student clients in the revision of a text, respond to different student needs and abilities, work with a variety of writing tasks and rhetorical situations, and develop a richer sense of writing as a complex and negotiated social process.

 

ENGL 492.S01 Writing Poetry

W 3:00-5:50PM

Dr. Christine Stewart

In this semester’s Writing Poetry: Form & Format, each student will write, design, and produce a chapbook (small book) of poetry. In addition to studying the chapbook as a genre and the basic elements of book design, students will develop advanced poetry craft skills, particularly those of form (both received and experimental form traditions). Students will also refine their abilities to work as a productive member of a writing community during Large Group Response (workshop).

Prerequisites: For undergraduates, English 283 and/or English 383. Graduate students without prior creative writing experience need to contact Dr. Stewart before enrolling. 

Texts:

  • An Exaltation of Forms: Contemporary Poets Celebrate the Diversity of Their Art by Annie Ridley Crane Finch (Author), Katherine Lore Varnes (Author)
  • Four chapbooks, titles To Be Announced
  • Student work

 

ENGL 492.S02 Literary Publishing Practicum

Independent Study

Prof. Steven Wingate

A hands-on, semester long introduction to literary publishing centered on, but not limited to, the production of SDSU's literary journal Oakwood, founded in 1976. Our work will involve soliciting, editing, producing, and promoting the magazine, as well as an overview of the publishing industry and an opportunity to craft a publishing resume. Ideal for Creative Writing concentrators and Professional Writing minors, this class will give you demonstrable experience with workplace practices applicable in fields from editing to corporate communications. Please note that this is cross-listed as an Experiential Learning (EXPL) course and will count toward the Experiential Learning Scholars certificate. This will be conducted as an independent study course, though we will arrange for common meeting times based on the schedules of those involved. Please note that this course may also include graduate students enrolled in ENGL 791. Book: Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century by John B. Thompson

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GRADUATE COURSES

  • On-Campus M.A. Program

ENGL 592.S01 Writing Poetry

W 3:00-5:50PM

Dr. Christine Stewart

In this semester’s Writing Poetry: Form & Format, each student will write, design, and produce a chapbook (small book) of poetry. In addition to studying the chapbook as a genre and the basic elements of book design, students will develop advanced poetry craft skills, particularly those of form (both received and experimental form traditions). Students will also refine their abilities to work as a productive member of a writing community during Large Group Response (workshop).

Prerequisites: For undergraduates, English 283 and/or English 383. Graduate students without prior creative writing experience need to contact Dr. Stewart before enrolling. 

Texts:

  • An Exaltation of Forms: Contemporary Poets Celebrate the Diversity of Their Art by Annie Ridley Crane Finch (Author), Katherine Lore Varnes (Author)
  • Four chapbooks, titles To Be Announced
  • Student work

 

ENGL 704.S01: Introduction to Graduate Studies

W 3:00-5:00PM 

Dr. Sharon Smith

English 704: Introduction to Graduate Studies is required of all first-year graduate students. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to modern and contemporary literary theory and its applications. Students will write short response papers and will engage at least one theoretical approach in their own fifteen- to twenty-page scholarly research project. In addition, this course will further introduce students to the M.A. program in English at South Dakota State University and provide insight into issues related to the profession of English studies.

 

ENGL 729.01: Seminar in American Literature since 1900

TU 3:00-5:50PM

Dr. Jason McEntee

In this course, we will examine three significant novels from the late 1990s: David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest (1996), Thomas Pynchon’s Mason & Dixon (1997), and Don DeLillo’s Underworld (1997).  This will be a course that involves close reading and intense discussion of that reading.  Attendance is mandatory.  Our initial discussions of each novel will be rooted in the contexts of “postmodernism/postmodernity” (and, of course, “modernism/modernity”).  After that, however, I expect that we will embark on a wide-ranging, organic discussion of the issues emanating from these novels.  Course requirements include: 1) reading (lots of it); 2) a presentation on your working definition of “postmodern literature” along with a “text inventory” that traces and illustrates your relationship to this period; and 3) a rigorously-researched final seminar essay of 15-20 pages (which also includes a required paper proposal and brief discussion with the class).

 

ENGL 791.S01 Literary Publishing Practicum

Independent Study

Prof. Steven Wingate

A hands-on, semester long introduction to literary publishing centered on, but not limited to, the production of SDSU's literary journal Oakwood, founded in 1976. Our work will involve soliciting, editing, producing, and promoting the magazine, as well as an overview of the publishing industry and an opportunity to craft a publishing resume. Ideal for Creative Writing concentrators and Professional Writing minors, this class will give you demonstrable experience with workplace practices applicable in fields from editing to corporate communications. This will be conducted as an independent study course, though we will arrange for common meeting times based on the schedules of those involved. Please note that this course may also include undergraduate students enrolled in ENGL 492. Book: Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century by John B. Thompson

  • Online M.A. Program

ENGL 792.ST1 Grant & Proposal Writing: Nursing

Internet

Amber Jensen

This online course is designed to teach students in the field of nursing to write effectively and strategically within their professional context, with an emphasis on the scholarly and grant writing needs in the profession. Students will research their professional community’s writing context, including its standards and practices, and will produce a variety of professional documents, including research and grant proposals, reflective annotations, informal reports, and an academic presentation. In doing so, they will improve their understanding of rhetoric and the ways in which their writerly choices effect the accessibility and usability of writing in a professional and scholarly context. 

 

ENGL 792.ST2 J. R. R. Tolkien: Before and Beyond His Rings

Internet

Dr. M. Nagy

J. R. R. Tolkien draws upon an imposing array of ancient languages, literatures, prosodic forms, and styles in order to construct both Middle Earth and those who inhabit it. Yet, despite Tolkien’s rather daunting range, his works nevertheless entertain rather than intimidate the reader for they seamlessly blend history and mythology, fact and fantasy, and philosophy and philology into labyrinthine tales of remote lands, times, and peoples, ones whose darker sides often seem disturbingly modern and familiar.

This course will introduce students to select Old English, Middle English, and Old Norse texts (all in translation), and examine The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings in light of these earlier works. Further, in addition to the required reading for this course, students will also participate in the Tolkien Film Festival sponsored by the Department of English. This will afford them the opportunity to explore, and perhaps write their papers about, the adaptation of Tolkien’s written word into an alternative medium. Various themes we’ll cover include cultural relativity; the origin and nature of evil; religion and its fairytale and folktale motifs; philology; the use and abuse of power; ecological theory; mythology and the modern day; and the corruptions and continuities of language, to name a few.

Texts:

  • The Anglo-Saxon World: An Anthology. Trans. Kevin Crossley-Holland. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1999.
  • The Saga of the Volsungs. Trans. Jesse L. Byock. London: Penguin, 1999.
  • Tolkien, J. R. R. The Hobbit. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.
  • —. The Lord of the Rings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.
  • —. The Tolkien Reader. New York: Ballantine Books, 1966
  • Jackson, Peter. All three LotR Films.

 

ENGL 792.ST3 Teaching with Film

Internet

Prof. Steven Wingate

As film (broadly defined for this course to include television and other forms of video) becomes more pervasive in our world, it becomes more imperative for educators to acknowledge its presence and design learning materials that address it. This course is a laboratory for learners—expected to be either current SDSU graduate students or active instructors at tribal colleges or universities, technical and community colleges, and K-12 schools—on the practicalities of teaching with film. While the course will cover some foundational materials about film and learning theory, its primary focus will be creative approaches to teaching. After some group work on films we examine in common, learners will spend the bulk of the semester developing learning materials specifically designed for their own classrooms and institutions.

The end goal is a deliverable plan for a film-centered course—or unit within a pre-existing course—that learners can give to their administrators and use in their classrooms. To accomplish this, I will ask learners to research their own curriculum and find a film-centered course or unit that will work within that framework, as well as develop specific, pedagogically-supported course materials: learning objectives, feedback strategies, assessment rubrics, etc. Each step in the process rests upon the previous one, resulting in a polished and useable final product. Proposed projects may include critical, historical, and cultural approaches to film, as well as filmmaking projects.