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2021 Spring Semester

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

Composition courses that offer many sections (ENGL 101, 201, 277, and 279) are not listed on this schedule unless they are tailored to specific thematic content or particularly appropriate for specific programs and majors.

  • 100-200 level

ENGL 201.S21 Sports Writing

MWF 11:00-11:50

Amber Jensen

This course will focus on the study of and practice in writing persuasive prose, with the aim to improve writing skills in all disciplines. Students will read selections from The Best American Sports Writing as examples of research-driven, persuasive prose and will analyze the rhetorical choices the author of each text makes and how those choices enhance argument and purpose. This reading and analysis will inform students' own rhetorical choices as they write their own research-driven, persuasive essays. Throughout the writing process, students will also create an annotated bibliography and write two reflective narratives that encourage reflection on their learning and writing so that students leave the course with a deepened understanding of the process of research and writing and the rhetorical choices they will make as writers in their future personal and professional writing.

ENGL 222.01 British Literature II

Tu Th 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM

Dr. Nicole Flynn

This survey of British literature will introduce you to key authors, texts, genres, and debates from the late-eighteenth century to the present. 

ENGL 240.ST1 Juvenile Literature: 5th-12th Grade

INTERNET 

Randi L. Anderson

In English 240 students will develop the skills to interpret and evaluate various genres of literature for juvenile readers. This particular section will focus on various works of literature at approximately the 5th-12th grade level. We will read a large range of works that fall into this category, as well as information on the history, development, and genre of juvenile literature.

Readings for this course include works such as Night, The Hunger Games, Brown Girl Dreaming, All American Boys, Esperanza Rising, V for Vendetta, Red Rising, Animal Farm, Fahrenheit 451, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, and Lord of the Flies. These readings will be paired with chapters from Reading Children’s Literature: A Critical Introduction to help develop understanding of various genres, themes, and concepts that are both related to juvenile literature, and also present in our readings.

In addition to exploring various genres of writing (poetry, non-fiction, fantasy, historical, non-fiction, graphic novels, etc.) this course will also allow students to engage in a discussion of larger themes present in these works such as censorship, race, rebellion and dissent, power and oppression, gender, knowledge, and the power of language and the written word.

Students’ understanding of these works and concepts will be developed through readings, discussion posts, and exams.

ENGL 242.S01: American Literature II

TU/TH 1:30-3:45pm

Dr. Paul Baggett

This course surveys a range of U.S. literatures from about 1865 to the present, writings that treat the end of slavery and the development of a segregated America, increasingly urbanized and industrialized U.S. landscapes, waves of immigration, and the fulfilled promise of “America” as imperial nation. The class will explore the diversity of identities represented during that time, and the problems/potentials writers imagined in response to the century’s changes—especially literature’s critical power in a time of nation-building. Required texts for the course are The Norton Anthology of American Literature: 1865 to the Present, Shorter Ninth Edition and Jesmyn Ward’s, Sing Unburied Sing: A Novel.

ENGL 283  Introduction to Creative Writing

Section 01 MWF 1:00-1:50

Section 02 MWF 2:00-2:50

Dr. Christine Stewart 

In English283, which fulfills SGR #2 requirements for advanced composition, you will use primary research to write in creative genres (in Dr. Stewart’s section, poetry and creative nonfiction). During the first half of the semester, you will learn how to craft poetry by developing your imagery, lineation, and sound skills; you will conduct primary research in the Agricultural Heritage Museum to inspire your poems. During the second half of the semester, you will learn how to craft creative nonfiction by strengthening your scene-building, dialogue-creating, and reflection skills; you will conduct research to integrate into your piece as well. A cornerstone to any creative writing course is learning to read through the eyes of a writer; sharing your work for response from both peers and the professor is also an essential component. We will be doing both.  I use portfolio assessment as the main assessment tool; I do not give exams. If you have any questions about this fast-paced, experience-immersed, meaning-making writing course, please do not hesitate to contact me. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL101.

ENGL 284.S01 Introduction to Criticism

MWF 1:00-1:50PM

Dr. Michael Keller

In this course, you will learn about the history of literary and cultural criticism, study and practice different approaches and methodologies to reading and writing about texts, and produce critical work of your own. This course is designed to continue your introduction to the field of English and further develop your interpretive skills. Our textbook Literary Theory and Criticism: An Introduction, presents an historical narrative of movements important to English Studies, explains and explores the connections between literary theories. We will discover new ways of approaching literature and put those ideas into practice through discussion and writing. 

  • 300-level

English 330: Shakespeare

TU/TH 11:00am-12:15pm

Dr. M. Nagy

This course will focus on William Shakespeare’s poetic and dramatic works, as well as the cultural and social contexts in which he wrote them. In this way, we will gain a greater appreciation of the fact that literature does not exist in a vacuum, for it both reflects and influences contemporary and subsequent cultures

ENGL 383.S01 Creative Writing I

MWF 2:00-2:50PM

Prof. Steven Wingate 

Explore the practice of writing fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction by writing and revising your own artistic work. Our coursework will involve close readings of sample texts, craft essays, and the writing of your fellow students, which we will peer workshop in both small-group and full-class settings. Designed primarily for English majors or minors, as well as other students serious about learning to write literature, 383 differs from 283 in that it does not fulfill an IGR or SGR credit. It does, however, count toward the creative writing concentration (or as an English elective). Please note that while 283 requires research-based writing projects, 383 does not. Without this requirement, it is more focused on idea generation, completion strategy, and the full exercise of your creative capacities. 

ENGL 383 differs from ENGL 283 in that it does not fulfill an IGR or SGR credit. Because it primarily draws majors from English and affiliated fields, it focuses on the relationship between creative work and the study of literature. While research-based projects are welcome, they are not required.

  • 400-level

ENGL 479 Capstone

Tu 3:00-5:50

Unassigned. Please check in Fall 2020 back for topic description and instructor. 

ENGL 491.S01: Undergraduate Peer Tutoring

Independent Study

Dr. Nathan Serfling

Since their beginnings in the 1920s and 30s, writing centers have come to serve a number of functions: as hubs for writing across the curriculum initiatives, sites to develop and deliver workshops, and resource centers for faculty as well as students, among other functions. But the primary function of writing centers has necessarily and rightfully remained the tutoring of student writers. This course will immerse you in that function in two parts. During the first four weeks, you will explore writing center praxis -- that is, the dialogic interplay of theory and practice related to writing center work. This part of the course will orient you to writing center history, key theoretical tenets, and practical aspects of writing center tutoring. Once we have developed and practiced this foundation, you will begin work in the writing center as tutors, responsible for assisting a wide variety of student clients with numerous writing tasks. Through this work, you will learn to actively engage with student clients in the revision of a text, respond to different student needs and abilities, work with a variety of writing tasks and rhetorical situations, and develop a richer sense of writing as a complex and negotiated social process. Prerequisites: Students wishing to enroll in this course must be of junior or senior standing and needs to provide the name of an English department faculty member who will serve as a reference for them.

ENGL 492.S01 Writing Creative Nonfiction

Wednesday 6:00-8:50PM

Dr. Christine Stewart

This course will immerse you into the practices of reading and writing of Creative Nonfiction (CNF). We will seek to define and name this genre, discuss what reasons we have for transforming experiences into writing, problematize the nature of truth(s) and memory, describe the role of the “I,” and probe the ethics of writing about and representing the people in our lives. We will also practice strategies and techniques for reading, writing, revising, responding to, and editing CNF texts. In this course, you will develop your ability to think critically, speculatively, and imaginatively. Not only will you build an appreciation for the art of creative nonfiction, you will strengthen your ability to write it. 

  • The Writer’s Portable Mentor by Priscilla Long. ISBN: 9780984242108
  • The Fourth Genre edited by Robert L. Root, Jr. and Michael Stenberg  6th Edition. ISBN: 978-0-205-17277-1

ENGL 492.S02: Academic Editing & Publishing

Monday 3:00-5:50 p.m.

Dr. Katherine Malone

This course focuses on the theory and practice of professional editing in the field of English studies. Our readings will consider questions relating to authorship, textuality, and the role of the editor, and assignments will provide hands-on practice introducing, annotating, and copyediting literary texts. Our coursework includes two edited articles, a textual history essay, a blog, and an edited anthology of nineteenth-century short stories. Through these assignments, students will learn techniques for ensuring consistent, accurate copy, including the use of style sheets and guides. They will also learn how to track and manage editorial projects. In addition to proposing and designing individual projects, students will gain practical experience working with the editorial team of Victorian Periodicals Review, an academic journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press.

Required Texts:

  • Chicago Manual of Style. 17th ed. University of Chicago Press, 2017. (digital subscription: https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/help-tools/subscription.html)
  • Einsohn, Amy, Marilyn Schwartz, and Erika Buky. The Copyeditor’s Handbook and Workbook: The Complete Set. Oakland: University of California Press, 2019. (9780520306677)
  • Keleman, Erick. Textual Editing and Criticism: An Introduction. New York: Norton, 2009. (9780393929423)
  • Williams, Joseph M., and Joseph Bizup. Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace. 12th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2016. (9780134080413)

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GRADUATE COURSES

  • On-Campus M.A. Program

ENGL 592.S01 Creative Nonfiction

Wednesday 6:00-8:50 PM

Dr. Christine Stewart

This course will immerse you into the practices of reading and writing of Creative Nonfiction (CNF). We will seek to define and name this genre, discuss what reasons we have for transforming experiences into writing, problematize the nature of truth(s) and memory, describe the role of the “I,” and probe the ethics of writing about and representing the people in our lives. We will also practice strategies and techniques for reading, writing, revising, responding to, and editing CNF texts. In this course, you will develop your ability to think critically, speculatively, and imaginatively. Not only will you build an appreciation for the art of creative nonfiction, you will strengthen your ability to write it. 

  • The Writer’s Portable Mentor by Priscilla Long. ISBN: 9780984242108
  • The Fourth Genre edited by Robert L. Root, Jr. and Michael Stenberg  6th Edition. ISBN: 978-0-205-17277-1

ENGL 592.S02: Academic Editing & Publishing

Monday 3:00-5:50 p.m.

Dr. Katherine Malone

This course focuses on the theory and practice of professional editing in the field of English studies. Our readings will consider questions relating to authorship, textuality, and the role of the editor, and assignments will provide hands-on practice introducing, annotating, and copyediting literary texts. Our coursework includes two edited articles, a textual history essay, a blog, and an edited anthology of nineteenth-century short stories. Through these assignments, students will learn techniques for ensuring consistent, accurate copy, including the use of style sheets and guides. They will also learn how to track and manage editorial projects. In addition to proposing and designing individual projects, students will gain practical experience working with the editorial team of Victorian Periodicals Review, an academic journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press.

Required Texts:

  • Chicago Manual of Style. 17th ed. University of Chicago Press, 2017. (digital subscription: https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/help-tools/subscription.html)
  • Einsohn, Amy, Marilyn Schwartz, and Erika Buky. The Copyeditor’s Handbook and Workbook: The Complete Set. Oakland: University of California Press, 2019. (9780520306677)
  • Keleman, Erick. Textual Editing and Criticism: An Introduction. New York: Norton, 2009. (9780393929423)
  • Williams, Joseph M., and Joseph Bizup. Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace. 12th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2016. (9780134080413)

ENGL 704.S01: Introduction to Graduate Studies

Wednesday 3:00-5:50 PM 

Dr. Sharon Smith

Introduction to Graduate Studies is required of all first-year graduate students. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to modern and contemporary literary theory and its applications. Students will write short response papers and will engage at least one theoretical approach in their own fifteen- to twenty-page scholarly research project. In addition, this course will further introduce students to the M.A. program in English at South Dakota State University and provide insight into issues related to the profession of English studies.

ENGL 710.S01: Seminar in Rhetoric: Visual Rhetoric

Tuesday 3:00-5:50 PM

Dr. Jason McEntee  

From the course catalog: Intensive study of selected periods or topics in rhetoric, with special emphasis on their relation to issues in criticism and composition. Credits: 3

This course will explore these (and other) questions: What does it mean to be visually literate? How does the role of the visual (that which we see in our day-to-day lives) affect the ways we process our thoughts and, in turn, develop our social, political, historical, racial, and gender-related attitudes about the things we see?  How have the New Media and Digital Humanities movements/initiatives come into being, and how do they impact the humanities?

Please think of this as a course with two distinct halves. In the first half, we will ponder definitions of New Media through a wide variety of readings and viewings. In the second half, we will take on two “case studies” that consist primarily of complicating our definitions through careful film analysis from two very different, yet two very complementary, decades: 1) 1980s Cinema: Human Bodies and the Ghosts of Vietnam; and 2) The 9/11 Event: Cinema, War, and Spectacle after the Towers.

 

  • Online M.A. Program

ENGL 792.ST1: Literature and Human Rights 

Dr. Paul Baggett

If, as Thomas Jefferson declared, human rights are “inalienable” and their applications “self-evident,” why do we continue to disagree over these two words and their applications? For centuries, we have debated not only what rights we deem universal, but also to whom those rights apply. In our age of mass deportations, Muslim bans, refugee crises, mass incarceration, growing economic inequality, and most recently, militant, anti-lockdown protests, human rights have become a contested subject of discussion. This course examines a range of literary, cinematic, theoretical, and historical works that engage critically with these debates.

ENGL 792.ST2 Technical and Professional Writing

Amber Jensen

This online course is designed to teach students to write effectively and strategically within their professional context, with an emphasis on the scholarly and grant writing needs in the profession. Students will research their professional community’s writing context, including its standards and practices, and will produce a variety of professional documents, including research and grant proposals, reflective annotations, informal reports, and an academic presentation. In doing so, they will improve their understanding of rhetoric and the ways in which their writerly choices effect the accessibility and usability of writing in a professional and scholarly context.