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2020 Fall Semester

Composition courses that offer many sections (ENGL 101, 201, 277, and 279) are not listed on this schedule unless they are tailored to specific thematic content or particularly appropriate for specific programs and majors.


UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

  • 100-200 level

ENGL 151.01: Intro to English Studies 

MWF 11:00-11:50AM

Dr. Katherine Malone

This course explores big questions about how we read, what we read, and why it matters. We’ll read works of fiction, poetry, and drama through a variety of lenses as we explore the disciplinary concerns and methods of English studies. You will also develop practical skills in critical reading and writing, research methods, and MLA-style bibliography and citation. Through lively discussions, essays, and a final creative project, we’ll work together to define and develop the tools of an English major and prepare you for the next steps on your journey into literary studies.

ENGL 201.S08 Sports Writing

MWF 11:00-11:50am

Amber Jensen

This course will focus on the study of and practice in writing persuasive prose, with the aim to improve writing skills in all disciplines. Students will read selections from The Best American Sports Writing as examples of research-driven, persuasive prose and will analyze the rhetorical choices the author of each text makes and how those choices enhance argument and purpose. This reading and analysis will inform students' own rhetorical choices as they write their own research-driven, persuasive essays. Throughout the writing process, students will also create an annotated bibliography and write two reflective narratives that encourage reflection on their learning and writing so that students leave the course with a deepened understanding of the process of research and writing and the rhetorical choices they will make as writers in their future personal and professional writing.

ENGL 201.S18: Composition II: The Mind/Body Connection

TU/TH 12:30-1:45pm

Dr. Sharon Smith

In this section of English 201, students will use research and writing to learn more about problems that are important to them and envision ways to address those problems. The course will focus specifically on issues related to the body, the mind, and the relationship between them. The topics we discuss may include the correlation between social media and eating disorders; the effect of dolls and action figures on body image; the degree to which beliefs about race and gender influence school dress codes; the problems of head trauma and steroid use in sports; and the unique mental and physical challenges faced by college students today.

ENGL 221.S01: British Literature I

TU/TH 11:00am-12:15pm

Dr. M. Nagy

English 221 is a survey of early British literature from its inception in the Old English period with works such as Beowulf and the “Battle of Maldon,” through the Middle Ages and the incomparable writings of Geoffrey Chaucer and the Gawain-poet, to the Renaissance and beyond. Students will explore the historical and cultural contexts in which all assigned reading materials were written, and they will be expected to bring that information to bear on class discussion. Likely themes that this class will cover include heroism, humor, honor, religion, heresy, and moral relativity. Students will write one research paper in this class and sit for two formal exams: a midterm covering everything up to that point in the semester, and a comprehensive final. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. Notes: Course meets SGR #4. Probable texts include the following:

  • The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Middle Ages.  Ed.  Alfred David, M. H. Abrams, and Stephen Greenblatt.  9th ed.  New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.
  • The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Sixteenth Century and Early Seventeenth Century.  Ed.  George M. Logan, Stephen Greenblatt, Barbara K Lewalski, and M. H. Abrams.  9th ed.  New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.
  • The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century.  Ed.  George M. Logan, Stephen Greenblatt, Barbara K Lewalski, and M. H. Abrams.  9th ed.  New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.           
  • Gibaldi, Joseph.  The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6th ed.  New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2003.
  • Any Standard College Dictionary.

ENGL 240.S01: Juvenile Literature-Elementary-5th Grade: The Adventure of Childhood

MWF 12:00 - 12:50PM

Jennifer Kluck 

This section of Juvenile Literature will focus on literature for young readers through the theme “the adventure of childhood.” Young children often see even the most mundane aspects of life as adventures, so we’ll spend time in this course exploring how authors reflect that attitude through their writing. We’ll spend our time reading and discussing children’s literature critically, that is, reading literature for children closely and analytically. By doing so, we can learn much about ourselves, our society, and indeed, our culture, past and present. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.

ENGL 240.ST1: Juvenile Literature-Elementary-5th Grade 

INTERNET

Randi L. Anderson

In ENGL 240, students will develop the skills to interpret and evaluate various genres of literature for juvenile readers. This particular section will focus on various works of literature at approximately the K-5 grade level. We will read a large range of works that fall into this category, as well as information on the history, development, and genre of juvenile literature. Readings for this course include classical works such as Hatchet, Little Women, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, and Brown Girl Dreaming, as well as newer works like Storm in the Barn, Anne Frank’s Diary: A Graphic Adaptation, Lumberjanes, and a variety of picture books. These readings will be paired with chapters from Reading Children’s Literature: A Critical Introduction to help develop understanding of various genres, themes, and concepts that are both related to juvenile literature, and also present in our readings.

In addition to exposing students to various genres of writing (poetry, historical fiction, non-fiction, fantasy, picture books, graphic novels, etc.) this course will also allow students to engage in a discussion of larger themes present in these works such as censorship, race, and gender. Students’ understanding of these works and concepts will be developed through readings, research, discussion posts, exams, and writing assignments designed to get students to practice analyzing poetry, picture books, informational books, and transitional/easy readers. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.                                              

ENGL 241.S01: American Literature I 

TU/TH 9:30-10:45AM

Dr. Michael Keller                    

Background to and survey of major works from the beginnings to the Civil War. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.

ENGL 268.S01 Literature: Plague Fiction

MWF 1:00-1:50PM

Dr. Nicole Flynn

In this class we will read about pandemics past, present, and future. From the bubonic plague to the zombie apocalypse, representations of illness appear throughout literature and give us the opportunity to explore and understand the challenges of our present moment. Suitable for non-majors who want an introduction on how to read, understand, and enjoy literature or majors interested in the topic. This is not a writing-intensive or discussion-based course; course work will include reading quizzes, exams, and some informal or in-class writing.

ENGL 283.S01  Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 1:00-1:50PM

Dr. Christine Stewart

In English283, which fulfills SGR #2 requirements for advanced composition, you will use primary research to write in creative genres (in Dr. Stewart’s section, poetry and creative nonfiction). During the first half of the semester, you will learn how to craft poetry by developing your imagery, lineation, and sound skills; you will conduct primary research in the Agricultural Heritage Museum to inspire your poems. During the second half of the semester, you will learn how to craft creative nonfiction by strengthening your scene-building, dialogue-creating, and reflection skills; you will conduct research to integrate into your piece as well. A cornerstone to any creative writing course is learning to read through the eyes of a writer; sharing your work for response from both peers and the professor is also an essential component. We will be doing both.  I use portfolio assessment as the main assessment tool; I do not give exams. If you have any questions about this fast-paced, experience-immersed, meaning-making writing course, please do not hesitate to contact me. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL101.

ENGL 283.ST1  Introduction to Creative Writing

INTERNET

Amber Jensen

This online course explores creative writing as a way of encountering the world; student writers will engage in the research practices that inform the writing of literature and in the composing strategies writers use to create literary texts, including idea-generating, drafting, workshop, reflection, and revision. Through their reading and writing of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction, students will learn and apply analytical strategies necessary for successful and dynamic peer response and for the creation of polished literary writing.

  • 400-level

AIS/ENGL 447.S01 American Indian Literature of the Present

MWF 2:00-2:50

Dr. Paul Baggett

This course introduces students to contemporary works by authors from a variety of American Indian nations. We will explore how these works not only enhance our understanding of the history of indigenous peoples, but also consider the political dimensions of their aesthetic practices. Topics to be explored include the long-term effects of colonialism and ongoing colonization (including the effects of relocation and termination policies); indigenous conceptions of and relations to land; the mixed-blood trope; gender relations and complementarity in Native societies; Native sovereignty and political rights; appropriations of Native culture; and concepts of indigeneity, nationalism and pan-tribalism. Possible authors include some of the more familiar names—N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, James Welch, Louise Erdrich, and Joy Harjo—as well as some new voices, including Terese Marie Mailhot and this year’s Common Read author, Tommy Orange. We will also view the feature-length film Songs My Brother Taught Me, and read essays by leading scholars in American Indian Studies, including Jodi Byrd, Philip Deloria, Nick Estes, Simon Ortiz, Thomas King, David Treuer, Gerald Vizenor, Robert Warrior, Gwen Westerman, and Craig Womack.

ENGL 479.S01: Capstone Course & Writing in the Discipline: The Art of Darkness: Gothic Literature and Film

Tuesday 3:00-5:50PM

Dr. Sharon Smith

With the publication of Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto in 1764, the Gothic genre officially came into being. Featuring dark tales of physical violence and psychological terror, the Gothic incorporates elements such as distressed heroes and heroines pursued by tyrannical villains; gloomy estates with dark corridors, secret passageways, and mysterious chambers; haunting dreams, troubling prophecies, and disturbing premonitions; abduction, imprisonment, and murder; and, of course, a varied assortment of corpses, apparitions, and monsters. In this course, we will trace the development of the Gothic in literature and film from the publication of Walpole’s novel up to the present time. As we do so, we will consider how the genre engages philosophical beliefs about the beautiful and sublime; develops aesthetic theories regarding the nature and purpose of art; and shapes psychological understandings of human beings’ encounters with horror, terror, the fantastic, and the uncanny. In addition, we’ll discuss the ways in which Gothic literature and film intervene in their social and historical contexts. As the Gothic genre suggests, the true horrors of human existence often have less to do with inexplicable supernatural phenomenon than with the hard realities of everyday life.

Authors and filmmakers covered in the course may include Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Emily Brontë, Charles Brockden Brown, Hannah Crafts, Edgar Allan Poe, Flannery O’ Connor, Shirley Jackson, Toni Morrison, Alfred Hitchcock, John Carpenter, Stanley Kubrick, Ridley Scott, Tim Burton, Jennifer Kent, Ana Lily Amirpour, and Jordan Peele.

ENGL 492.S01 Peer Tutoring (Writing Center)

Times TBA

Dr. Nathan Serfling

Since their beginnings in the 1920s and 30s, writing centers have come to serve a number of functions: as hubs for writing across the curriculum initiatives, sites to develop and deliver workshops, and resource centers for faculty as well as students, among other functions. But the primary function of writing centers has necessarily and rightfully remained the tutoring of student writers. This course will immerse you in that function in two parts. During the first four weeks, you will explore writing center praxis -- that is, the dialogic interplay of theory and practice related to writing center work. This part of the course will orient you to writing center history, key theoretical tenets, and practical aspects of writing center tutoring. Once we have developed and practiced this foundation, you will begin work in the writing center as tutors, responsible for assisting a wide variety of student clients with numerous writing tasks. Through this work, you will learn to actively engage with student clients in the revision of a text, respond to different student needs and abilities, work with a variety of writing tasks and rhetorical situations, and develop a richer sense of writing as a complex and negotiated social process.

Prerequisites: Students wishing to enroll in this course must be of junior or senior standing and needs to provide the name of an English department faculty member who will serve as a reference for them.

ENGL 492.ST1: Fiction Workshop

INTERNET

Prof. Steven Wingate

This workshop-intensive course is designed to hone your skills at the craft of fiction. You'll develop and revise original short stories, flash fiction, and even novel excerpts as you explore the fundamentals of storytelling: full-bodied characters, robust story lines, palpable environments, and unique narrative voices. You'll be asked to pay particular attention to the fiction process so that you can continue your development as a writer beyond the class. You'll also be workshopping one another's fiction, which is an essential tool in expanding your authorial toolbox. In addition to looking closely at peer work, you'll read classic and contemporary fiction as well as craft essays by recognized masters of the genre. We will utilize a full range of digital tools to ensure that this course is a personable, communication-filled experience.

GRADUATE COURSES

On-Campus

ENGL 591.S01: Independent Study in Teaching Composition

Thursday 3:00-5:50

Dr. Michael Keller

This course is designed to ground you in the histories, theories, and practices of writing instruction and thereby to: 1) prepare you to teach your own classes at SDSU and beyond, and 2) introduce you to issues and debates that have shaped and that currently shape the profession. To serve these aims, the readings, discussions, and writing assignments will address a variety of practical and theoretical concerns. The former include assignment and course design, assessment, and classroom pedagogies; the latter, theories of rhetoric and composition, as well as the social and institutional contexts that inform them. Past texts have included the following: 

  • Reading Popular Culture: An Anthology for Writers, edited by Michael Keller 
  • They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing by Gerald Graff and Cathy 
  • Birkenstein 
  • The St. Martin’s Handbook by Andrea Lunsford 
  • St. Martin’s Guide to Teaching Writing by Cheryl Glenn & Melissa A. Goldthwaite 
  • Teaching Composition: Background Readings, edited by T.R. Johnson 
  • A Teaching Subject: Composition Since 1966 by Joseph Harris 
  • Rhetoric, Poetics, and Cultures: Refiguring College English Studies by James A. Berlin 
  • Lives on the Boundary: A Moving Account of the Struggles and Achievements of America’s 
  • Educationally Underprepared by Mike Rose 
  • My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student by Rebekah Nathan 
  • Understanding Popular Culture by John Fiske 
  • Trash Culture: Popular Culture and the Great Tradition by Richard Keller Simon 
  • The Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle by Chris Hedges 
  • The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age by Sven Birkerts

English 723.S01: Monsters and the Monstrous in Medieval Literature

Wednesdays 3:00-5:50

Dr. M. Nagy

Medieval literature plays host to a broad spectrum of monstrous figures ranging from the more familiar dragons, monsters, dwarves, and trolls to the rather obscure draugar, haugbúar, and berserkers, to name a few.  Scholars often interpret these figures, with varying degrees of conviction, as the ostracized “other” in Icelandic, Old English, and Middle English literature, but, as we will see, such interpretations form the beginning of the discourse rather than its end.  The purpose of this reading-intensive Seminar is to expose students to a cross section of particularly strange works which revolve in whole or in part around supernatural characters; to theorize the narrative, cultural, religious, and political functions that these characters serve; and to answer the question (if only tentatively) of why fantasy fiction (whose roots are firmly fixed in the Middle Ages) continues to engage the attention of 21st-century authors, scholars, and students alike.

Online

ENGL 592.ST1: Fiction Workshop

Prof. Steven Wingate

This workshop-intensive course is designed to hone your skills at the craft of fiction. You'll develop and revise original short stories, flash fiction, and even novel excerpts as you explore the fundamentals of storytelling: full-bodied characters, robust story lines, palpable environments, and unique narrative voices. You'll be asked to pay particular attention to the fiction process so that you can continue your development as a writer beyond the class. You'll also be workshopping one another's fiction, which is an essential tool in expanding your authorial toolbox. In addition to looking closely at peer work, you'll read classic and contemporary fiction as well as craft essays by recognized masters of the genre. We will utilize a full range of digital tools to ensure that this course is a personable, communication-filled experience.

ENGL 792.ST2: Topics: The Gothic

Dr. Sharon Smith

With the publication of Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto in 1764, Gothic literature officially came into being. Dark tales of physical violence and psychological terror, Gothic literature incorporates elements such as distressed heroes and heroines pursued by tyrannical villains; gloomy estates with dark corridors, secret passageways, and mysterious chambers; haunting dreams, troubling prophecies, and disturbing premonitions; abduction, imprisonment, and murder; and, of course, a varied assortment of corpses, apparitions, and monsters. In this course, we will trace the development of Gothic literature during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in Britain and the United States. As we do so, we will consider how this literature engages philosophical beliefs about the beautiful and sublime; develops aesthetic theories regarding the nature and purpose of art; and shapes psychological understandings of human beings’ encounters with horror, terror, the fantastic, and the uncanny. In addition,  we’ll discuss how these texts intervene in the social and historical contexts in which they were written. As the authors of much Gothic literature suggest, the true horrors of human existence often have less to do with inexplicable supernatural phenomenon than with the hard realities of everyday life.

Texts for the course will include novels, poetry, and short fiction by writers such as Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Emily Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, Christina Rossetti, Charles Brockden Brown, Hannah Crafts, Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.