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2019 Fall Semester

Please note that this list does not include composition and technical writing classes (such as ENGL 101, 201, 277, and 379).


UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

  • 100-200 level

ENGL/GLST 125.S01  Intro Peace & Conflict Studies    

MWF 8:00-8:50 AM

Dr. Paul Baggett                        

The primary objective of this course is to explore alternative means of conflict resolution on the personal, local, statewide, national, and global levels. To meet these objectives, students will analyze a selection of literature and films, hear from a series of guest speakers, attend relevant campus events, write a midterm and a final paper, and complete a service-learning project.   Possible texts include Hanh’s Peace Is Every Step, Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Lederach’s The Little Book of Conflict Resolution, Chabon and Waldman’s Kingdom of Olives and Ash: Writers Confront the Occupation, and Brach’s Approaches to Peace. We will also view the films The Fog of WarInequality for All, and Encounter Point.

ENGL 151.01: Intro to English Studies

MWF 11:00-11:50AM

Dr. Nicole Flynn

This course, required of all first year English majors, will provide students with the background and professional skills to read critically and write analytically about literary texts. In addition, the course provides training in research methods for the discipline, including use of print and electronic sources and MLA documentation style. Students will generate bibliographies, source studies, and both documented and undocumented critical essays. Essays will be based on readings from poetry, fiction, and drama and may include other genres such as non-fiction and film.

ENGL 151.02: Intro to English Studies

MWF 11:00-11:50AM

Dr. Christine Stewart

This course, required of all first year English majors, will provide students with the background and professional skills to read critically and write analytically about literary texts. In addition, the course provides training in research methods for the discipline, including use of print and electronic sources and MLA documentation style. Students will generate bibliographies, source studies, and both documented and undocumented critical essays. Essays will be based on readings from poetry, fiction, and drama and may include other genres such as non-fiction and film. This course will introduce English majors to methods of critical reading and writing about literature. Our assignments—which include short essays, bibliographies, oral presentations, and a research paper—will help you develop skills in close reading, research methods, and MLA style.

ENGL 210.S02D: Introduction to Literature

INTERNET

Jodi Andrews

Readings in fiction, drama, and poetry to acquaint students with literature and aesthetic form. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.

ENGL 221.S01: British Literature I

MWF 10:00-10:50

Dr. Sharon Smith 

Prerequisites: ENGL 101. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.

In English 221, a survey covering the first half of British literature, we will read and discuss a selection of poetry, drama, and prose from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. As we study these texts, you will become familiar with the social, political, philosophical, and theological contexts that produced them. We will encounter a fascinating array of characters this semester—monsters, warriors, adventurers, travelers, sinners, devils, murderers, coquettes, “fallen” women, and tyrants—and we will find them embroiled within a variety of conflicts—personal, familial, romantic, religious, and moral. As we engage with these characters and conflicts, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which authors use literary form to give expression to ideas and experiences.

Texts covered will include Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Selections from The Book of Margery Kempe, Selections from John Milton's Paradise Lost, Aphra Behn's The Rover, Alexander Pope's The Rape of the Lock, Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, and selections of poetry and prose by Edmund Spenser, John Donne, Katharine Philips, John Wilmot, Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Jonathan Swift, and Mary Wortley Montagu.

ENGL 240.S01: Juvenile Literature-Elementary-5th Grade

MWF 12:00 - 12:50PM

Jennifer Kluck 

The Adventure of Childhood

This section of Juvenile Literature will focus on literature for young readers through the theme “the adventure of childhood.” Young children often see even the most mundane aspects of life as adventures, so we’ll spend time in this course exploring how authors reflect that attitude through their writing. We’ll spend our time reading and discussing children’s literature critically, that is, reading literature for children closely and analytically. By doing so, we can learn much about ourselves, our society, and indeed, our culture, past and present.

ENGL 240.S02: Juvenile Literature-Elementary-5th Grade

MWF, 12:00-12:50PM

Jodi Andrews
 
A survey of the history of literature written for children and adolescents, and a consideration of the various types of juvenile literature. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.

ENGL 240.S02D: Juvenile Literature-Elementary-5th Grade 

INTERNET

Amber L. Jensen

This course combines a historical perspective on the development of children's literature with a survey of the genres and themes of contemporary children's literature and the literary forms and elements used in that contemporary writing. As students engage with primary texts--ranging from Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl and Shel Silverstein's poetry to graphic novels and picture books--class discussions and activities will encourage deep analysis of these texts, examination of the influence of children's literature in shaping children's thinking and world view, and the resulting importance of exposing children to a variety of genres, themes, and forms of literature. 

Assignments include reading from Reading Children's Literature: A Critical Introduction, by Carrie Hintz and Eric L. Tribunella and approximately 12 primary texts, some of which students have access to in their family library, and others which can be purchased new or borrowed from your local library. Course work consists of individual reading and reflection journals, a variety of discussion and small group activities, one major paper, and an small group annotated bibliography.

ENGL 240.S03D: Juvenile Lit-Elementary-5th Grade 

INTERNET 

Randi L. Anderson

A survey of the history of literature written for children and adolescents, and a consideration of the various types of juvenile literature. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.

ENGL 240.S04D: Juvenile Lit -5th-12th Grade

INTERNET   

Nicole L. Biever   

Introduction to Juvenile Literature (grades five through twelve) focuses on literature written for children and young adults. The reading one does as a child and young adult holds the power to shape and mold that individual profoundly.  In this course, we will explore the role children's and young adults’ literature plays in human development and perform literary analysis of literature written for children.  Juvenile literature connects our present to the past while also offering insight into the future of humankind.  It helps children comprehend and connect to a diverse world and helps them tackle difficult ethical considerations and life experiences that may seem beyond their ability to comprehend.  Through juvenile literature, we will examine these issues, methods of literary analysis, and other special topics in children's literature.                                                

ENGL 241.S01: American Literature I

MWF 9:00-9:50AM

Dr. Paul Baggett                     

Background to and survey of major works from the beginnings to the Civil War. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.

ENGL 268.S01 Digital Game Narrative

MWF 2:00-2:50PM

Prof. Steven Wingate

From their beginnings, digital games have reached beyond adventures, puzzles, and first person shooters into complex forms of narrative that resemble what we find in novels and cinema. This course will explore the origins and history of digital game narrative (Zork, Legend of Zelda, Myst) as well as contemporary works such as The Last of Us, Kentucky Route Zero, Bioshock, Papers Please,Her Story,Life is Strange, Howling Dogs, and Firewatch. We will also read some game theory by authors such as Jesper Juul and Ian Bogost. Students should expect to interact critically with our texts and—if they desire—create world building and other planning documents for a proposed game of their own.

ENGL 283.S01  Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 1:00-1:50PM

Prof. Steven Wingate

Students will explore the various forms of creative writing (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama) not one at a time in a survey format—as if there were decisive walls of separation between then—but as intensely related genres that share much of their creative DNA. Through close reading and work on personal texts, students will address the decisions that writers in any genre must face on voice, rhetorical position, relationship to audience, etc. Students will produce and revise portfolios of original creative work developed from prompts and research. This course fulfills the same SGR #2 requirement as ENGL 201; note that the course will involve creative research projects. Successful completion of ENGL 101 is a prerequisite.  

  • 300-level

ENGL 330.S01: Shakespeare

TU/TH 11:00AM-12:15PM

Dr. Michael Nagy

Representative comedies, tragedies, and histories of Shakespeare Prerequisites: ENGL 101; ENGL 201 or ENGL 283 are recommended prerequisites.

  • 400-level

ENGL 479.S01: Capstone Course & Writing in the Discipline: Literature into Film

Tuesday 3:00-5:50PM

Dr. Jason McEntee

From the course catalog: ENGL 479 Capstone Course and Writing in the Discipline: (3 credits).  An in-depth study of selected major author (s), works(s), or other aspects of literary history; incorporates a review of current methods of literary criticism and an intensive focus on research and writing within the discipline. To be taken in the student’s final on-campus Fall or Spring semester, or during the senior year. Prerequisites: English major.

In his significant work Novels into Film: The Metamorphosis of Fiction into Cinema (1957), George Bluestone notes that the process of making novels into movies has been “overtly compatible [yet] secretly hostile” (2).  Bluestone’s assessment of this process prompts us to think of the love/hate binary that we engage when reading literature and then seeing it made into a movie: “This would make a great movie!”/“I can’t believe they butchered the book like that!”

This love/hate binary will serve as our springboard into a larger discussion of how to address the process of making literature into film.  This class will address the basic issues involved in the process, such as the narrative choices filmmakers have to make when adapting, to the economics involved in adapting, to the receptions (both critical and popular) of the final products (both the literature and the film).  However, these basic issues will serve only as a means to engage in larger discussions of genre and genre theory, literary theory, film theory, silent and sound film, the historical periods Modernity and Postmodernity and their resulting schools of thought Modernism and Postmodernism, among others.  Course requirements will include lots of reading, viewing, and discussion, three presentations, an annotated bibliography, and a major research essay.

ENGL 492.S01 Peer Tutoring (Writing Center)

Times TBA

Nathan Serfling

Since their beginnings in the 1920s and 30s, writing centers have come to serve a number of functions: as hubs for writing across the curriculum initiatives, sites to develop and deliver workshops, and resource centers for faculty as well as students, among other functions. But the primary function of writing centers has necessarily and rightfully remained the tutoring of student writers. This course will immerse you in that function in two parts. During the first four weeks, you will explore writing center praxis -- that is, the dialogic interplay of theory and practice related to writing center work. This part of the course will orient you to writing center history, key theoretical tenets, and practical aspects of writing center tutoring. Once we have developed and practiced this foundation, you will begin work in the writing center as tutors, responsible for assisting a wide variety of student clients with numerous writing tasks. Through this work, you will learn to actively engage with student clients in the revision of a text, respond to different student needs and abilities, work with a variety of writing tasks and rhetorical situations, and develop a richer sense of writing as a complex and negotiated social process.

Prerequisites: Students wishing to enroll in this course must be of junior or senior standing and needs to provide the name of an English department faculty member who will serve as a reference for them.

ENGL 492.S03: Academic Editing & Publishing

Monday 3:00-5:50pm

Dr. Katherine Malone

This course focuses on the theory and practice of professional editing in the field of English studies. Our readings will consider questions relating to authorship, textuality, and the role of the editor; assignments will include hands-on practice introducing, annotating, and copyediting literary texts. Students will learn techniques for ensuring consistent, accurate copy, including the use of style sheets and guides. They will also learn how to track and manage editorial projects. In addition to proposing and designing individual projects, students will gain practical experience working with the editorial team of an academic journal.

GRADUATE COURSES

On-Campus M.A. Program

ENGL 592.S02: Academic Editing & Publishing

Monday 3:00-5:50pm

Dr. Katherine Malone

This course focuses on the theory and practice of professional editing in the field of English studies. Our readings will consider questions relating to authorship, textuality, and the role of the editor; assignments will include hands-on practice introducing, annotating, and copyediting literary texts. Students will learn techniques for ensuring consistent, accurate copy, including the use of style sheets and guides. They will also learn how to track and manage editorial projects. In addition to proposing and designing individual projects, students will gain practical experience working with the editorial team of an academic journal.

English 705.S01: Seminar in Teaching Composition

Thursday 3:00-5:50

Dr. Michael Keller                                        

This course is designed to ground you in the histories, theories, and practices of writing instruction and thereby to: 1) prepare you to teach your own classes at SDSU and beyond, and 2) introduce you to issues and debates that have shaped and that currently shape the profession. To serve these aims, the readings, discussions, and writing assignments will address a variety of practical and theoretical concerns. The former include assignment and course design, assessment, and classroom pedagogies; the latter, theories of rhetoric and composition, as well as the social and institutional contexts that inform them. 

Past texts have included the following: 

  • Reading Popular Culture: An Anthology for Writers, edited by Michael Keller 
  • They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing by Gerald Graff and Cathy 
  • Birkenstein 
  • The St. Martin’s Handbook by Andrea Lunsford 
  • St. Martin’s Guide to Teaching Writing by Cheryl Glenn & Melissa A. Goldthwaite 
  • Teaching Composition: Background Readings, edited by T.R. Johnson 
  • A Teaching Subject: Composition Since 1966 by Joseph Harris 
  • Rhetoric, Poetics, and Cultures: Refiguring College English Studies by James A. Berlin 
  • Lives on the Boundary: A Moving Account of the Struggles and Achievements of America’s 
  • Educationally Underprepared by Mike Rose 
  • My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student by Rebekah Nathan 
  • Understanding Popular Culture by John Fiske 
  • Trash Culture: Popular Culture and the Great Tradition by Richard Keller Simon 
  • The Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle by Chris Hedges 
  • The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age by Sven Birkert

ENGL 726.S01 Seminar in English Literature since 1660

Satire and Social Change: The Eighteenth Century and Now

Wednesday 3-5:50

Dr. Sharon Smith               

The eighteenth century is sometimes referred to as the “Great Age of Satire,” and though the century was indeed characterized by an abundance of satirical texts--or texts that engage in targeted critique--accounts of satire from the period focus largely on a small body of texts by a half-dozen authors, all of them men. While we'll study the work of some of these authors, we'll also push beyond the boundaries of the canon to consider the voices of those who have been marginalized within or erased from the satirical tradition, most notably women satirists, whose work frequently reveals the ways in which satire is driven by political and personal self-interest, anxiety over “sameness” with the satirical target, and a determination to maintain unequal power relations. From their position as a marginalized group within both the literary marketplace and the larger culture, women satirists often explore how satire might function as a liberatory form of expression that can be used to establish sympathy with rather than encourage disdain for the socially disempowered.

In addition to considering the canonical satire of writers like Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope, we’ll also read the raunchy, cynical poetry of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester; the scandalous fiction of Delarivier Manley and Eliza Haywood; the bawdy accounts of prostitutes, thieves, and cavaliers in the narratives and plays of Charles Walker, John Gay, and Aphra Behn; the moralistic but racy prints of William Hogarth; the feminist verse satire of Sarah Fyge Egerton, Mary Wortley Montagu, Elizabeth Thomas, and Anne Finch; the abolitionist satire of Ignatius Sancho and Anna Barbauld; and the keen social satire of periodicalists Joseph Addison and Richard Steele and novelists Frances Burney and Jane Austen. We'll examine eighteenth-century satire in relation to a selection of twentieth/twenty-first century examples (Clueless, The Favourite, Nanette, Saturday Night Live, Portlandia, The Onion, Stephen Colbert, Samantha Bee, Trevor Noah, Rush Limbaugh, Tomi Lahren, status updates, tweets, memes, and hashtags). As we do so, we’ll consider ways in which satire can serve to generate dialogue rather than discord, foster inclusion rather than exclusion, and encourage self-reflection rather than attacks upon perceived "others."

In addition to a selection of shorter poetry and critical readings, texts for the class will include the following:

  • Aphra Behn, The Rover (play) and Oroonoko (novella)
  • Delarivier Manley, The New Atalantis (selections; novel)
  • Eliza Haywood, Fantomina (short fictional prose narrative)
  • Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels (selections; prose narrative)
  • Alexander Pope, The Rape of the Lock (poem)
  • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele, The Tatler and The Spectator (selections; periodicals)
  • John Gay, The Beggar’s Opera (play)
  • William Hogarth, The Harlot's Progress (series of prints)
  • Charles Walker, Authentic Memoirs of the Life, Intrigues, and Adventures of the Celebrated Sally Salisbury (short fictional prose narrative)
  • Frances Burney, Evelina (novel)
  • Charles Ignatious Sancho, The Letters of the Late Ignatius Sancho, an African (selections; letters)
  • Jane Austen, Emma (novel)
  • Amy Heckerling, Clueless (film)
  • Yorgos Lanthimos, The Favourite (film)

Online M.A. Program

ENGL 792.S01: Topics: Writing

Transformative Personal Narrative

Amber Jenson

In this creative writing course students will experience personal narrative's transformative potential. By exploring historical and cultural context through research and reflection, students will move beyond the retelling of experience to the development of transformative personal narrative. 

ENGL 792. S02: Topics: Literature

Victorian Magazines and Popular Fiction

Dr. Katherine Malone

Many of the Victorian novels we now consider classics first appeared serially and anonymously in periodicals. In the pages of these magazines, the common reader might find the latest instalment of a serial novel alongside articles on evolutionary theory or religious doctrine, exotic travel or colonial rebellion, women’s suffrage or the “angel in the house,” the expansion of the railway or advice for an expanding household. In this course, we will read four serialized novels in their original periodical context to discover the vast and complex network of ideas that their original audiences cared about. Using digital archives, we’ll turn the pages of Victorian magazines to explore how serial format, layout, and other periodical features influenced the form of the novel. We’ll also conduct reception histories to consider how reviewers and critics have responded to these novels at different times and in different places. Besides reading a lot of fun popular fiction and journalism, you will

  • Deepen your understanding of Victorian literature and culture.
  • Sharpen your critical reading and writing skills.
  • Learn specialized research methods in periodical studies and book history.
  • Develop pedagogical strategies and professional editing skills.