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2018 Spring Semester

Please note that this list does not include composition and technical writing classes (such as ENGL 101, 201, 277, and 379).

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

100-200 level

LING 203.01 English Grammar

8:00-9:15 TR

Nathan Serfling

The South Dakota State University 2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog describes LING 203 as consisting of “[i]nstruction in the theory and practice of traditional grammar including the study of parts of speech, parsing, and practical problems in usage” (362). 

“Grammar” is a mercurial term, though. Typically, we think of it to mean “correct” sentence structure, and, indeed, that is one of its meanings. But Merriam-Webster reminds us “grammar” also refers to “the principles or rules of an art, science, or technique,” taking it beyond the confines of syntactic structures. Grammar also evolves as a concept and in practice, and scholars and educators in the field of English studies debate the definition and nature of grammar, including how well its explicit instruction improves students’ writing. In this course, we will use the differing sensibilities, definitions, and fluctuations regarding grammar to guide our work. In the first half of the course, we will examine the parts of speech and sentences, address syntactic structures and functions, parse and diagram sentences, and explore the stylistic implications of grammar. We will use the second half of the course to address definitions of and debates about grammar. In other words, we will focus on what we might call “the three D’s” of grammar: doing grammar, defining grammar, and debating grammar.

 

ENGL 210.01 Introduction to Literature

Online

Gwen Horsley

Readings in fiction, drama, and poetry to acquaint students with literature and aesthetic form. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. Notes: Course meets SGR #4 or IGR #3.

 

English 211.01: The Vixens, Viragos, and Virtuous Women of Early World Literature

11:00-11:50 MWF

Dr. Michael S. Nagy

World Literature I typically covers “selected works of world literature in translation from ancient times through the Renaissance.”  In this course, we will focus primarily on works either by or about women, initially exploring early portrayals of female voice and agency as moral and social aberrations and gradually working our way towards reading some of the protofeminist writings of the Medieval and Renaissance periods.  Assignments will likely include reading quizzes, one short paper, and two exams: a midterm and a final. 

 

English 222.01: British Literature II

9:30-10:45 TR

Dr. Katherine Malone

This survey of British literature will introduce you to key authors, texts, genres, and historical debates from the late-eighteenth century to the present. As we explore the romantic, Victorian, modern, and postmodern eras, we’ll discuss literary works in the context of cultural forces including industrialization, empire, war, democracy, and changing attitudes about race, class, and gender. We’ll also read writers’ manifestos and critical responses to consider how the role of the artist and the purpose of art have been defined during these two tumultuous centuries. Our class meetings will include lecture, lively discussion, and student presentations. Exams and essay assignments will help you improve your critical reading and writing skills and enhance your appreciation of the history and functions of literature. 

 

ENGL/AIS 256.01: American Literature of the West

12:00-12:50 MWF

Dr. Paul Baggett

Historian Frederick Jackson Turner announced that the frontier officially “closed” in 1893, so why has the “American West” remained as much a subject of academic inquiry as a source of popular entertainment? This course surveys a range of literature and film for possible answers to this question. We will begin by familiarizing ourselves with the ideologies shaping the dominant narratives of the American West.  We will then turn our attention to a variety of works that address the concerns associated with these ideologies, beginning with the “revisionist” western film, Pale Rider, followed by Willa Cather’s O Pioneers!, and ending with Kent Meyer’s The Work of Wolves and  the Coen brothers’ filmic adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men. Of course, one people’s frontier is always another people’s homeland, and our reading of American Indian writers Luther Standing Bear, Louise Erdrich, and Sherman Alexie will further complicate the frontier myth and the values associated with it. In addition to reading/viewing and discussing these works of literature and film, and to a completing a number of short-answer, reading comprehension exercises, students will complete three papers during the course of the semester.

 

ENGL 283:01  Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 1:00-1:50

Darla Biel

The South Dakota State University General Catalog: Undergraduate Programs provides the following overview of English 283: “Study and practice in the techniques of writing fiction, poetry, and/or drama.” More specifically, in this course students will study and write poetry and creative nonfiction. Roughly the first third of the course will focus on poetry, and the latter two-thirds on short and longer forms of creative nonfiction. Students will also conduct research and write prose analyzing and critiquing their own and others’ writing, and, in so doing, receive instruction in critical thinking, analysis and in features of language use. Finally, in small groups, they will prepare a lesson plan and lead a class discussion of an assigned creative writing craft essay.

 

English 283.02: Introduction to Creative Writing  (Honors/EXPL)

1:00-1:50 MWF

Prof. Steven Wingate

Students will explore the various forms of creative writing (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama) not one at a time in a survey format—as if there were decisive walls of separation between then—but as intensely related genres that share much of their creative DNA. Through close reading and work on personal texts, students will address the decisions that writers in any genre must face on voice, rhetorical position, relationship to audience, etc. Students will produce and revise portfolios of original creative work developed from prompts and research. This course fulfills the same SGR as ENGL 201; note that the course will involve creative research projects. Successful completion of ENGL 101 is a prerequisite. Please note that this is cross-listed as an Experiential Learning (EXPL) course and will count toward the Experiential Learning Scholars certificate. 

 

English 284.01: Introduction to Criticism

11:00-12:15 TR

Dr. Katherine Malone

This course will introduce you to the critical methods that have shaped English studies, including formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, Marxism, historicism, psychoanalysis, feminism, gender studies, race theory, and postcolonial theory. We will read the works of key theorists and apply their ideas to a variety of literary texts. Quizzes, presentations, short response papers, and essays will help you master critical concepts and develop the analytical, interpretive, and research skills necessary for scholars in our field.

 

300-level

English 363.01: Carnival, Capital, and Containment: American Literature and Culture Between WWII and Watergate 

12:30-1:45 TR 

Dr. Michael Keller 

Our work in this class will identify and explore a series of distinct but related themes—the antic, the carnivalesque, the Dionysian, the erotic, and the subversive—that emerge in American fiction and poetry of the mid-twentieth century in response to the changing demographics, politics, technologies, and economics of post-war American life—changes that inspire these rebellious urges but also conspire to contain them. Works will include fiction by Mary McCarthy, Jack Kerouac, Richard Yates, John Updike, Philip Roth, Erica Jong, and Thomas McGuane; poetry by Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Amiri Baraka, Ed Sanders, Joanne Kyger, Adrienne Rich, and Robert Bly; and nonfiction by Henry Miller, Norman Mailer, Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, Camille Paglia, Barbara Ehrenreich, and others. We also will examine documentary footage of some of the era’s seminal events: the Cold War and McCarthy hearings, the folk music movement, the Kennedy assassinations, the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the Women’s Movement, Beatlemania, The Merry Pranksters’ bus trip and acid tests, the Summer of Love, the 1968 Democratic Convention, Woodstock, Altamont, the Kent State shootings, and the Watergate hearings. We will attend as well to a selection of the era’s music and visual art. 

Students will write three short “experimental” responses and three essays in response to the texts (both print and cinematic)—totaling thirty pages. They also will deliver one short oral report, as part of a group project. All assignments will afford students the opportunity to advance their skills in reading text critically—in regard to its style, form, content, and cultural moment and context.

 

English 363.02/Honors 383.01: From La Mancha to Macondo: Storytelling, Identity and Ethics

5:00-8:00 Wednesday

Dr. Nicole Flynn and Dr. Christi Garst-Santos

In this class, we will read two novels in translation that revolutionized the literary, political, and cultural norms of their times: Don Quixote and One Hundred Years of Solitude. Both novels, hailed as two of the most influential works in world literature, explore the themes of storytelling, translation, cultural encounters and conflicts, identity, and ethics. Our primary goals throughout the course will be to examine how the stories that we tell about ourselves – both as individuals and nations – matter, as well as the ethical obligations and consequences of telling and hearing stories.

In 1605, Spanish novelist Miguel de Cervantes published Don Quixote. In depicting the diverse, multicultural realities of early modern Spain, Cervantes documents the different possibilities for Spanish identity and attempts to make sense of the competing views of self, community, and nation. Over 350 years later, Colombian author Gabriel Garcia Marquez published One Hundred Years of Solitude, a novel that records the family saga of the Buendías as they found the city of Macondo. Their history becomes a metaphor for how modern authors depict personal and historical transformations and how we develop our idea of self with or without a stable national identity. Note: Knowledge of Spanish is not required.

 

English 383.01: Creative Writing I

1:00-150 MWF

Dr. Christine Stewart

Creative Writing I, or “The World of the Real Writer,” focuses on strengthening poetry, creative nonfiction, and/or fiction writing skills by developing longer/more complex projects. Through the processes of writing and revising creative texts, the class helps students learn more craft concepts and develop more sophisticated applications for them. Large-group workshop sessions will challenge students to expand and strengthen their practice of peer response. Students will also self-select texts to read as a writer and use to contextualize their creative work. Finally, reading submissions for a state-wide poetry and prose contest will give them real-world editing experience.

ENGL 383 differs from ENGL 283 in that it does not fulfill an IGR or SGR credit. Because it primarily draws majors from English and affiliated fields, it focuses on the relationship between creative work and the study of literature. While research-based projects are welcome, they are not required.

Required texts: Sellers, Heather. The Practice of Creative Writing, 3rd edition;      one contemporary mentor text of the student’s choice; student work

 

400-level

ENGL 479.01: Capstone Course and Writing in the Discipline: Remembering The Great War

3:00-5:50 Tuesday

Dr. Nicole Flynn

The Great War. World War I. The War to End all Wars. 2018 marks the 100th year anniversary of the conclusion of this epic conflict. This war ended the carefree Edwardian era and ushered in the violent birth of modernity. It left no part of British culture and society untouched—gender roles, the economy, technology, medicine, family structure to name a few—and it redrew the map of the world. Although we will anchor our examination in Britain’s experience of the war, our scope will inevitably extend in every direction across the globe. We will examine texts that represent this multifarious global event: canonical and neglected texts; written, visual, and dramatic; fiction and nonfiction; texts composed before, during, and after the war; texts about the battlefield and the homefront. Furthermore, we will interrogate the way it has been remembered and how texts represent the concept of war. 

 

English 491: Literary Publishing Practicum

Independent Study

Prof. Steven Wingate 

A hands-on, semester long introduction to literary publishing centered on, but not limited to, the production of SDSU's literary journal Oakwood, founded in 1976. Our work will involve soliciting, editing, producing, and promoting the magazine, as well as an overview of the publishing industry and an opportunity to craft a publishing resume. Ideal for Creative Writing concentrators and Professional Writing minors, this class will give you demonstrable experience with workplace practices applicable in fields from editing to corporate communications. Please note that this is cross-listed as an Experiential Learning (EXPL) course and will count toward the Experiential Learning Scholars certificate. This will be conducted as an independent study course, though we will arrange for common meeting times based on the schedules of those involved. Please note that this course may also include graduate students enrolled in ENGL 791. Book: Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century by John B. Thompson

 

ENGL 491.02 Peer Tutoring

MW 8:30-9:45

Nathan Serfling

Since their beginnings in the 1920s and 30s, writing centers have come to serve a number of functions: as hubs for writing across the curriculum initiatives, sites to develop and deliver workshops, and resource centers for faculty as well as students, among other functions. But the primary function of writing centers has necessarily and rightfully remained the tutoring of student writers. This course will immerse you in that function in two parts. During the first four weeks, you will explore writing center praxis--that is, the dialogic interplay of theory and practice related to writing center work. This part of the course will orient you to writing center history, key theoretical tenets, and practical aspects of writing center tutoring. Once we have developed and practiced this foundation, you will begin work in the writing center as tutors, responsible for assisting a wide variety of student clients with numerous writing tasks. Through this work, you will learn to actively engage with student clients in the revision of a text, respond to different student needs and abilities, work with a variety of writing tasks and rhetorical situations, and develop a richer sense of writing as a complex and negotiated social process.

Prerequisites: Students wishing to enroll in this course must be of junior or senior standing and needs to provide the name of an English department faculty member who will serve as a reference for them.

 

ENGL 491:03 Introduction to Grant Proposal Writing

4:00-5:15 Tuesday / Online Hybrid

Darla Biel

This course will introduce students to the grant proposal process and strengthen their ability to apply and communicate discipline-related knowledge more effectively and strategically within a professional context. Students will research the standards and practices of grant proposal writing, and will produce a variety of professional documents, including research and grant proposals, reflective annotations, informal reports, an academic presentation, and informal and formal course narratives. In doing so, they will improve their understanding of rhetoric and their ability to critically reflect upon and articulate their writer choices. Further, by the end of the successful completion of this course, learners will have identified a community partner, and will research, plan and write a complete shorter grant proposal and parts of a federal one on behalf of that partnering community business, agency or organization.  This course may be taken for Experiential Learning credit.

 

English 492.01: Writing Poetry: Form & Format

6:00-8:50 Wednesday

Dr. Christine Stewart

This course foregrounds student experimentation with patterns that build poems, in particular, form. Not only will students become familiar with traditional received forms and stanza structures, they will also learn about (and apply the constraints) of contemporary forms. Throughout the semester, large-group response workshops will give students experience sharpening their peer feedback skills. Students will also deepen their revision skills by iterating drafts to create exceptional poems, culminating in the design and execution of a format (a chapbook). Prerequisites: English 283 and/or English 383.

Texts:

 

GRADUATE COURSES

500-level

English 592.01: Writing Poetry: Form & Format

6:00-8:50 Wednesday

Dr. Christine Stewart

This course foregrounds student experimentation with patterns that build poems, in particular, form. Not only will students become familiar with traditional received forms and stanza structures, they will also learn about (and apply the constraints) of contemporary forms. Throughout the semester, large-group response workshops will give students experience sharpening their peer feedback skills. Students will also deepen their revision skills by iterating drafts to create exceptional poems, culminating in the design and execution of a format (a chapbook).

Graduate students will work alongside undergraduates in this course but with the expectation of more sophisticated, polished work. Furthermore, graduate students will review a chapbook of poetry outside of those read by the whole class, turn in a formal review, and present that review in-class. 

Prerequisites:  Graduate students without prior creative writing experience need to contact Dr. Stewart before enrolling. 

Texts:

 

700-level

English 704.01: Introduction to Graduate Studies

W 3:00-5:50

Dr. Sharon Smith

Introduction to Graduate Studies is required of all first-year graduate students. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to modern and contemporary literary theory and its applications. Over the course of the semester, we will study a number of major theoretical movements (formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, Marxism, historicism, feminism, gender studies, race theory, postcolonial theory) and will apply them to film, with a particular focus on the Western. Readings will include primary theoretical texts as well as a selection of scholarly essays/chapters focusing on film theory, the Western, and critical applications of theory to film. Students will write short weekly response papers and will engage at least one theoretical approach in their own fifteen- to twenty-page scholarly research project. In addition, this course will further introduce students to the M.A. program in English at South Dakota State University and provide insight into issues related to the profession of English studies.

Textbook:

  • Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan, Literary Theory: An Anthology, 3rd edition (Blackwell Publishing, 2017)

Films (subject to change):

  • George Stevens, Shane (1953)
  • Alfred Hitchcock, Vertigo (1958)
  • Clint Eastwood, Unforgiven (1992)
  • Jane Campion, The Piano (1993)
  • Maggie Greenwald, The Ballad of Little Jo (1993)
  • Barry Levinson, Wag the Dog (1996)
  • David Lynch, Mulholland Drive (2001)
  • Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain (2005)
  • Joel and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men (2007)
  • Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood (2007)
  • Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained (2011)

 

English 710.01: Seminar in Rhetoric: Visual Rhetoric 

3:00-5:50 Tuesdays

Dr. Jason McEntee

From the course catalog: Intensive study of selected periods or topics in rhetoric, with special emphasis on their relation to issues in criticism and composition. Credits: 3

This course will explore these (and other) questions: What does it mean to be visually literate? How does the role of the visual (that which we see in our day-to-day lives) affect the ways we process our thoughts and, in turn, develop our social, political, historical, racial, and gender-related attitudes about the things we see? What is New Media? What is/are the Digital Humanities?

Please think of this as a course with two distinct halves: 1) In the first half, we will ponder definitions of New Media through a wide variety of readings, viewings, and a guest panel of SDSU faculty; and 2) In the second half, we will take on two “case studies” that consist primarily of complicating our definitions through careful film analysis from two very different, yet two very complementary, decades.

In addition to the standard requirements of reading, viewing, writing, attending, and participating, you will also give a formal presentations and compose two short responses and a formal seminar essay of 15-20 pages with a rigorous research component.

We will maintain a purely objective, critical view throughout the semester. All enrolled students are required to participate in class discussions. This is a reading- and viewing-intensive class. Viewing of movies outside of class is required.

Potential readings include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Bolter, Jay and Richard Grusin. Remediation.
  • Goodell, Jessica, with John Hearn. Shade it Black: Death and After in Iraq.
  • Jones, Ann. They were Soldiers: How the Wounded Return from America’s Wars: The Untold Story.
  • Manovich, Lev. The Language of New Media.
  • Mirzoeff, Nicholas, ed. The Visual Culture Reader, Second Edition.
  • Morrell, David. First Blood.
  • Handouts on New Media, Digital Humanities, etc., as selected.

 

English 791.01: Literary Publishing Practicum

Independent Study

Prof. Steven Wingate 

A hands-on, semester long introduction to literary publishing centered on, but not limited to, the production of SDSU's literary journal Oakwood, founded in 1976. Our work will involve soliciting, editing, producing, and promoting the magazine, as well as an overview of the publishing industry and an opportunity to craft a publishing resume.  This class will give you demonstrable experience with workplace practices applicable in fields from editing to corporate communications. It will be conducted as an independent study course, though we will arrange for common meeting times based on the schedules of those involved.

Graduate courses will work side-by-side with undergraduates enrolled in ENGL 491 but with a different grading rubric and set of responsibilities, including a class-length (50-minute) oral presentation and a written research report on a publishing topic developed by the student. Books: Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century by John B. Thompson

 

ENGL 792:01 Professional and Technical Communication

Online

Darla Biel

This online course will teach students to write effectively and strategically within a professional context, and will be further tailored to meet the scholarly writing needs of students in health-related fields.  Students will research their professional community’s writing context, including its standards and practices, and will produce a variety of professional documents, including research and grant proposals, reflective annotations, informal reports, an academic presentation, and a course narrative. In doing so, they will improve their understanding of rhetoric and their ability to critically reflect upon and articulate their writerly choices.  Further, they will improve their ability to produce documents that are accessible and usable within a professional and scholarly context.