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Fall 2022 Semester

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

Composition courses that offer many sections (ENGL 101, 201, 277 and 379) are not listed on this schedule unless they are tailored to specific thematic content or particularly appropriate for specific programs and majors.

  • 100-200 level

English 151.S01 Introduction to English Studies 

Tue, Thu 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

Dr. Sharon Smith 

English 151 serves as an introduction to both the English major and the discipline of English studies. In this class, you will develop the thinking, reading, writing, and research practices that define both the major and the discipline. Much of the semester will be devoted to honing your literary analysis skills, and we will study and discuss texts from several different genres—poetry, short fiction, the novel, drama, and film—as well as some literary criticism. As we do so, we will explore the language of the discipline, and you will learn a variety of key literary terms and concepts. In addition, you will develop your skills as both a writer and researcher within the discipline of English. In addition to a selection of poems and short fiction, we will read Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun and Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and will watch Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window.

ENGL 201.ST1 English Composition II: The Mind/Body Connection

ST1 Online

S17 Tue, Thu 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Dr. Sharon Smith

In this section of English 201, students will use research and writing to learn more about problems that are important to them and articulate ways to address those problems. The course will focus specifically on issues related to the mind, the body, and the relationship between them. The topics we will discuss during the course will include the correlation between social media and body image; the effects of sports-related concussions; the efficacy of sex education programs; the degree to which beliefs about race and gender influence school dress codes; and the unique mental and physical challenges faced by college students today. In this course, you will be learning about different approaches to argumentation, analyzing the arguments of others, and constructing your own arguments. At the same time, you will be honing your skills as a researcher and developing your abilities as a persuasive and effective writer.

 

ENGL 201.16 Composition II: Do Stories Make Us Human? 

Tue, Thu 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

Dr. Katherine Malone 

In this course, you will hone your critical thinking, writing, and research skills as we explore the role of storytelling in everyday life. How do we use narrative to understand the world around us? How do stories shape our view of self and others? What effect does reading have on an individual’s body, mind, or morals? Are we moving toward a post-literate society in which images and memes supplant the written word, or does reading occupy an essential role in what we call the human experience? We will approach these questions through a range of disciplines, including literary criticism, cultural studies, philosophy, history, sociology, and neuroscience. Through our course reading, you will strengthen your skills in analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing complex arguments. And through our discussions, research, and writing assignments, you will become adept at constructing and supporting persuasive arguments of your own. 

 

ENGL 201.S06: Composition II (Sports Writing)  

Mon, Wed, Fri 11:00-11:50 a.m. 

Amber Jensen, M.A., M.F.A 

This course will focus on the study of and practice in writing persuasive prose, with the aim to improve writing skills in all disciplines. Students will read selections from The Best American Sports Writing as examples of research-driven, persuasive prose and will analyze the rhetorical choices the author of each text makes and how those choices enhance argument and purpose. This reading and analysis will inform students' own rhetorical choices as they write their own research-driven, persuasive essays. Throughout the writing process, students will also create an annotated bibliography and write two reflective narratives that encourage reflection on their learning and writing so that students leave the course with a deepened understanding of the process of research and writing and the rhetorical choices they will make as writers in their future personal and professional writing. 

 

ENGL 201 English Composition with an emphasis in Environmental Writing 

S08 Mon, Wed, Fri 11:00-11:50 a.m.

S09 Mon, Wed, Fri 12:00-12:50 p.m.

S13 Tue, Thu 8:00-8:50 a.m.

Gwen Horsley

English 201 will help students develop the ability to think critically and analytically and to write effectively for other university courses and careers. This course will provide opportunities to develop analytical skills that will help students become critical readers and effective writers. Specifically, in this class, students will (1) focus on the relationships between world environments, land, animals and humankind; (2) read various essays by environmental, conservational, and regional authors; and (3) produce student writings. Students will improve their writing skills by reading essays and applying techniques they witness in others’ work and those learned in class. This class is also a course in logical and creative thought.  Students will write about man’s place in the world and our influence on the land and animals, places that hold special meaning to them or have influenced their lives, and stories of their own families and their places and passions in the world. Students will practice writing in an informed and persuasive manner, in language that engages and enlivens readers by using vivid verbs and avoiding unnecessary passives, nominalizations, and expletive constructions. Students will prepare writing assignments based on readings and discussions of essays included in Literature and the Environment and other sources. They will use The St. Martin’s Handbook to review grammar, punctuation, mechanics, and usage as needed.  

 

ENGL 240.ST1: Juvenile Literature: Elementary-5th Grade 

Online 

Randi L. Anderson 

In English 240 students will develop the skills to interpret and evaluate various genres of literature for juvenile readers. This particular section will focus on various works of literature at approximately the K-5 grade level. We will read a large range of works that fall into this category, as well as information on the history, development, and genre of juvenile literature.  

Readings for this course include classical works such as Hatchet, Little Women, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, and Brown Girl Dreaming, as well as newer works like Strom in the Barn, Anne Frank’s Diary: A Graphic Adaptation, Lumberjanes, and a variety of picture books. These readings will be paired with chapters from Reading Children’s Literature: A Critical Introduction to help develop understanding of various genres, themes, and concepts that are both related to juvenile literature, and also present in our readings. 

In addition to exposing students to various genres of writing (poetry, historical fiction, non-fiction, fantasy, picture books, graphic novels, etc.) this course will also allow students to engage in a discussion of larger themes present in these works such as censorship, race, and gender. Students’ understanding of these works and concepts will be developed through readings, research, discussion posts, exams, and writing assignments designed to get students to practice analyzing poetry, picture books, informational books, and transitional/easy readers.  

 

ENGL 240.ST2 Juvenile Literature (Elementary-5th Grade)

Online

April Myrick

Juvenile Literature is a literature course in which students will develop the skills to interpret and evaluate various genres of literature for juvenile readers. This semester’s course focuses on children’s literature (approximately birth-5 th grade). We will read a large range of children’s literature and discuss the history and development of today’s literature. Students’ understanding of these works and concepts will be developed through readings, research, class discussions, various writing assignments, and other work. Although this course is directed towards those students who will be working with small to elementary aged children, any major is welcome to take the course. However, this course does not focus on pedagogy, but rather on juvenile literature as a genre/disciple worthy of study and critical analysis.

 

ENGL 241.S01: American Literature I 

Tue, Thu 12:30-1:45 p.m. 

Dr. Paul Baggett 

This course provides a broad, historical survey of American literature from the early colonial period to the Civil War. Ranging across historical periods and literary genres—including early accounts of contact and discovery, narratives of captivity and slavery, poetry of revolution, essays on gender equality, and stories of industrial exploitation—this class examines how subjects such as colonialism, nationhood, religion, slavery, westward expansion, race, gender, and democracy continue to influence how Americans see themselves and their society. 

Required Texts  

  • The Norton Anthology of American Literature: Package 1, Volumes A and B Beginnings to 1865, Ninth Edition. (ISBN 978-0-393-26454-8) 
  • Whitehead, Colson. The Underground Railroad. (ISBN: 978-0-345804-32-7) 

 

ENGL 283.S01:  Introduction to Creative Writing

Mon, Wed, Fri 1:00-1:50 p.m.

Prof. Steven Wingate

Students will explore the various forms of creative writing (fiction, nonfiction, and poetry) not one at a time in a survey format—as if there were decisive walls of separation between then—but as intensely related genres that share much of their creative DNA. Through close reading and work on personal texts, students will address the decisions that writers in any genre must face on voice, rhetorical position, relationship to audience, etc. Students will produce and revise portfolios of original creative work developed from prompts and research. This course fulfills the same SGR #2 requirement as ENGL 201; note that the course will involve creative research projects. Successful completion of ENGL 101 (including by test or dual credit) is a prerequisite.  

 

ENGL 283.ST1: Introduction to Creative Writing 

Online 

Amber Jensen, M.A., M.F.A 

This course explores creative writing as a way of encountering the world, research as a component of the creative writing process, elements of craft and their rhetorical effect, and drafting, workshop, and revision as integral parts of writing polished literary creative work. Student writers will engage in the research practices that inform the writing of literature and in the composing strategies and writing process writers use to create literary texts. Through their reading and writing of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction, students will learn about craft elements, find examples of those craft elements in published works, and apply these elements in their own creative work, developed through weekly writing activities, small group and large group workshop, and conferences with the instructor. Work will be submitted, along with a learning reflection and revision plan in each genre and will then be revised and submitted as a final portfolio at the end of the semester to demonstrate continued growth in the creation of polished literary writing. 

  • 300-level

ENGL 379.ST3  Technical Communication: Bio Micro Majors 

Online

April Myrick  

This section of English 379 is the second of a sequence for Biology and Microbiology students. In this course, students will draft and polish job- or program-seeking documents including a resume. Students will improve their information literacy via discipline-based research. Students will also devote a significant portion of the semester to analyzing and organizing their BIOL490 research for writing and presentation via a number of platforms and mediums (such as scholarly journal article, traditional presentation, informative poster, and multimedia) and for both technical and lay audiences.  

 

ENGL 379.S03 Technical Communication for Economics Majors 

Tue, Thu 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

April Myrick  

In this section of English 379, students will prepare a variety of workplace/business-related documents (such as a memo, cover letter & resume, white paper, and recommendation report) and presentations for both technical and lay audiences. While the course is broadly designed for Econ majors, it is open to all majors, especially those with an interest in business and economics. 

 

ENGL 379.S05BMb: Technical Communication for Biology & Microbiology

Tue, Thu 8:00-9:15 a.m. 

Lisa Madsen 

This section of English 379 is the second of a sequence for Biology and Microbiology students. In this course, students will draft and polish job- or program-seeking documents including a resume. Students will improve their information literacy via discipline-based research. Students will also devote a significant portion of the semester to analyzing and organizing their BIOL490 research for writing and presentation via a number of platforms and mediums (such as scholarly journal article, traditional presentation, informative poster, and multimedia) and for both technical and lay audiences.

  • 400-level

AIS/ENGL 447.S01: American Indian Literature of the Present 

Thursdays 4:00-7:00 p.m. 

Dr. Paul Baggett  

This course introduces students to contemporary works by authors from various Indigenous nations. Students examine these works to enhance their historical understanding of Indigenous peoples, discover the variety of literary forms used by those who identify as Indigenous writers, and consider the cultural and political significance of these varieties of expression. Topics and questions to be explored include:  

  1. Genre: What makes Indigenous literature indigenous? 
  2. Political and Cultural Sovereignty: Why have an emphasis on tribal specificity and calls for “literary separatism” emerged in recent decades, and what are some of the critical conversations surrounding such particularized perspectives? 
  3. Gender and Sexuality: What are the intersecting concerns of Indigenous Studies and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and how might these research fields inform one another? 
  4. Trans-Indigeneity: What might we learn by comparing works across different Indigenous traditions, and what challenges do such comparisons present? 
  5. Aesthetics: How do Indigenous writers understand the dynamics between tradition and creativity? 
  6. Visual Forms: What questions or concerns do visual representations (television and film) by or about Indigenous peoples present?   

Required Texts 

  • Akiwenzie-Damm, Kateri and Josie Douglas (eds), Skins: Contemporary Indigenous Writing. IAD Press, 2000. (978-1864650327) 
  • Erdrich, Louise, The Sentence. Harper, 2021 (978-0062671127) 
  • Harjo, Joy, Poet Warrior: A Memoir. Norton, 2021 (978-0393248524) 
  • Harjo, Sterlin and Taika Waititi, Reservation Dogs (selected episodes) 
  • Marshall, Joseph, Returning to the Lakota Way, 2nd Edition. Hay House, 2014 (978-1401931766) 
  • Orange, Tommy, There There, Vintage, 2019 (978-0525436140) 
  • Critical essays by Alexie, Allen, Cohen, Cox, King, Kroeber, Ortiz, Piatote, Ross and Sexton, Smith, Taylor, Teuton, Treuer, Vizenor, and Womack. 

 

ENGL 479.S01: Medieval Outlaw Tales (Capstone Course)

Wednesdays 3:00-5:50 p.m.

Dr. M. Nagy

Modern society’s fascination with outlaws manifests itself in the continued success of novels, films, and television programs about notoriously violent criminals such as Al Capone, Jesse James, and Clyde Barrow, all of whom are celebrated for their daring deeds in the face of adversity.  This preoccupation with criminal heroes extends back to medieval legends, romances, and ballads about Robin Hood, William Wallace, and Hereward, to name just a few. English 479, a reading-intensive course, primarily aims to expose students to the rich tradition of outlaw literature written in Middle English, Middle Scots, Old English, and Old Norse (all in translation); to explore the historical, social, political, religious, legal, and literary contexts in which these works flourished;  and to grapple with the deceptively simple question of what makes these outlaws appear worthy of admiration and, at times, emulation.

 

ENGL 491.S01 Undergraduate Peer Tutoring

Independent Study

Dr. Nathan Serfling

Since their beginnings in the 1920s and 30s, writing centers have come to serve a number of functions: as hubs for writing across the curriculum initiatives, sites to develop and deliver workshops and resource centers for faculty as well as students, among other functions. But the primary function of writing centers has necessarily and rightfully remained the tutoring of student writers. This course will immerse you in that function in two parts. During the first four weeks, you will explore writing center praxis - that is, the dialogic interplay of theory and practice related to writing center work. This part of the course will orient you to writing center history, key theoretical tenets and practical aspects of writing center tutoring. Once we have developed and practiced this foundation, you will begin work in the writing center as tutors, responsible for assisting a wide variety of student clients with numerous writing tasks. Through this work, you will learn to actively engage with student clients in the revision of a text, respond to different student needs and abilities, work with a variety of writing tasks and rhetorical situations and develop a richer sense of writing as a complex and negotiated social process. Prerequisites: Students wishing to enroll in this course must be of junior or senior standing and needs to provide the name of an English and Interdisciplinary Studies department faculty member who will serve as a reference for them.

 

ENGL 492.01: Professional Editing & Publishing

Mondays 3:00-5:50 p.m.

Dr. Katherine Malone

This course focuses on the theory and practice of professional editing in the humanities. Our readings will consider questions relating to authorship, textuality, and the role of the editor, and assignments will provide hands-on practice introducing, annotating, and copyediting literary and scholarly texts. Students will learn techniques for ensuring consistent, accurate copy, including the use of style sheets and guides. They will also learn how to track and manage editorial projects. Course assignments include two edited articles, a textual history essay, a blog, and an edited anthology of nineteenth-century short stories. In addition to proposing and designing individual projects, students will gain practical experience working with the editorial team of a scholarly journal.

REQUIRED TEXTS

  • Chicago Manual of Style. 17th ed. University of Chicago Press, 2017. https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org.
  • Einsohn, Amy, Marilyn Schwartz, and Erika Buky. The Copyeditor's Handbook and Workbook: The Complete Set. Oakland: University of California Press, 2019.
  • Keleman, Erick. Textual Editing and Criticism: An Introduction. New York: Norton, 2009.
  • Williams, Joseph M., and Joseph Bizup. Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace. 12th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2016.

 

ENGL 492.ST1: Fiction Workshop

Online

Prof. Steven Wingate

This workshop-intensive course is designed to hone your skills at the craft of fiction. You'll develop and revise original short stories, flash fiction, and even novel excerpts as you explore the fundamentals of storytelling: full-bodied characters, robust story lines, palpable environments, and unique narrative voices. You'll be asked to pay particular attention to the fiction process so that you can continue your development as a writer beyond the class. You'll also be workshopping one another's fiction, which is an essential tool in expanding your authorial toolbox. In addition to looking closely at peer work, you'll read classic and contemporary fiction as well as craft essays by recognized masters of the genre. We will utilize a full range of digital tools to ensure that this course is a personable, communication-filled experience.

 

ENGL 492.S02: Film Criticism

Tuesdays 3:00-5:50 p.m.

Dr. Jason McEntee

Do you want to study movies in a genre-oriented format (such as those we typically call the Western, the screwball comedy, the science fiction, or the crime/gangster, to name a few)? Do you want to explore the different critical approaches for talking and writing about movies (such as auteur, feminist, genre, or reception)?

In this class, you will examine movies through viewing and defining different genres while, at the same time, studying and utilizing different styles of film criticism. You will share your discoveries in both class discussions and short writings. The final project will be a formal written piece of film criticism based on our work throughout the semester. The course satisfies requirements and electives for all English majors and minors, including both the Film Studies and Professional Writing minors. Note: Viewing of movies outside of class required and may require rental and/or streaming service fees.


GRADUATE COURSES

ENGL 592.01: Professional Editing & Publishing

Mondays 3:00-5:50 p.m.

Dr. Katherine Malone

This course focuses on the theory and practice of professional editing in the humanities. Our readings will consider questions relating to authorship, textuality, and the role of the editor, and assignments will provide hands-on practice introducing, annotating, and copyediting literary and scholarly texts. Students will learn techniques for ensuring consistent, accurate copy, including the use of style sheets and guides. They will also learn how to track and manage editorial projects. Course assignments include two edited articles, a textual history essay, a blog, and an edited anthology of nineteenth-century short stories. In addition to proposing and designing individual projects, students will gain practical experience working with the editorial team of a scholarly journal.

REQUIRED TEXTS

  • Chicago Manual of Style. 17th ed. University of Chicago Press, 2017. https://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org.
  • Einsohn, Amy, Marilyn Schwartz, and Erika Buky. The Copyeditor's Handbook and Workbook: The Complete Set. Oakland: University of California Press, 2019.
  • Keleman, Erick. Textual Editing and Criticism: An Introduction. New York: Norton, 2009.
  • Williams, Joseph M., and Joseph Bizup. Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace. 12th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2016.

 

ENGL 592.S02: Film Criticism

Tuesdays 3:00-5:50 p.m.

Dr. Jason McEntee

Do you want to study movies in a genre-oriented format (such as those we typically call the Western, the screwball comedy, the science fiction, or the crime/gangster, to name a few)? Do you want to explore the different critical approaches for talking and writing about movies (such as auteur, feminist, genre, or reception)?

In this class, you will examine movies through viewing and defining different genres while, at the same time, studying and utilizing different styles of film criticism. You will share your discoveries in both class discussions and short writings. The final project will be a formal written piece of film criticism based on our work throughout the semester. The course satisfies requirements and electives for all English majors and minors, including both the Film Studies and Professional Writing minors. Note: Viewing of movies outside of class required and may require rental and/or streaming service fees.

 

ENGL 592.ST1: Fiction Workshop

Online

Prof. Steven Wingate

This workshop-intensive course is designed to hone your skills at the craft of fiction. You'll develop and revise original short stories, flash fiction, and even novel excerpts as you explore the fundamentals of storytelling: full-bodied characters, robust story lines, palpable environments, and unique narrative voices. You'll be asked to pay particular attention to the fiction process so that you can continue your development as a writer beyond the class. You'll also be workshopping one another's fiction, which is an essential tool in expanding your authorial toolbox. In addition to looking closely at peer work, you'll read classic and contemporary fiction as well as craft essays by recognized masters of the genre. We will utilize a full range of digital tools to ensure that this course is a personable, communication-filled experience.

 

ENGL 705.S01 Seminar in Teaching Composition

Thursdays 1:00-3:50 p.m.

Dr. Nathan Serfling

This course will provide you with a foundation in the pedagogies and theories (and their attendant histories) of writing instruction, a foundation that will prepare you to teach your own writing courses at SDSU and elsewhere. As you will discover through the course, though, writing instruction does not come with any prescribed set of “best” practices. Rather, writing pedagogies stem from and continue to evolve because of a variety of (largely unsettled) debates. Part of becoming a practicing writing instructor, then, is studying these debates to develop a sense of what “effective writing instruction” might mean for you in our particular program and how you might adapt that understanding to different programs and contexts.

As we read about, discuss and research these debates and their implications for the teaching of writing, we will address a variety of practical and theoretical topics. The practical focus will allow us to attend to topics relevant to your immediate classroom practices: designing a curriculum and various types of assignments, assessing student work and delivering the course content, among others. Our theoretical topics will begin to reveal the underpinnings of these various practical matters, including their historical, rhetorical, social and political contexts. In other words, we will investigate the praxis—the dialogic interactions of practice and theory—of writing pedagogy. As a result, this course aims to prepare you not only as a writing teacher but also as a nascent writing pedagogy scholar.

 

ENGL 792 ST2: Reading Contemporary Poetry and Creative Nonfiction 

Online 

Amber Jensen, M.A., M.F.A  

In this course, we will explore how contemporary poetry and creative nonfiction build upon traditional models but also continue to innovate and blur genre distinctions. We will draw from theoretical texts How to Read (and Write About) Poetry, Second Edition by Susan Holbrook and The Next American Essay (A New History of the Essay) by John D’Agata) and read individual poems and essays, as well as complete collections and memoirs, including (selections subject to change): Kaleb Ray Cadrilli’s Water I Won’t Touch, Tyree Daye’s Cardinal, Christine Stewart’s The Poet & The Architect, Joy Harjo’s Crazy Brave, and Mary Alice Haug’s Out of Loneliness. Our rhetorical reading of these texts will focus on the relationship between text and context, examining how these works reflect and impact the world they are produced and consumed in, what we bring to our reading of these texts and what these texts offer to us.