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2022 Spring Semester

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

Composition courses that offer many sections (ENGL 101, 201, 277, and 379) are not listed on this schedule unless they are tailored to specific thematic content or particularly appropriate for specific programs and majors.

  • 100-200 level

ENGL 201.ST4 Nature and the Environment

Katie E. O’Leary, JD

Online

This course highlights professional accounts of non-fictional nature writing and offers students an opportunity to build upon their research skills and writing processes. Drawing upon examples from Literature and the Environment: A Reader on Nature and Culture, students will write a narrative argument, two rhetorical analyses, an annotated bibliography, and a research-based academic argument—all of which will illuminate our course theme. In addition to submitting multiple drafts of each writing assignment, students will—through peer review, class discussion, and thoughtful dissemination of their research—identify their existing rhetorical choices and carefully deploy persuasive writing moves.

 

English 201.ST5: Composition II: The Mind/Body Connection

Dr. Sharon Smith

Online

In this section of English 201, students will use research and writing to learn more about problems that are important to them and articulate ways to address those problems. The course will focus specifically on issues related to the mind, the body, and the relationship between them. The topics we will discuss during the course will include the correlation between social media and body image; the effects of sports-related concussions; the efficacy of sex education programs; the degree to which beliefs about race and gender influence school dress codes; and the unique mental and physical challenges faced by college students today. In this course, you will be learning about different approaches to argumentation, analyzing the arguments of others, and constructing your own arguments. At the same time, you will be honing your skills as a researcher and developing your abilities as a persuasive and effective writer.

 

ENGL 201.08: Composition II (Honors): The Living Newspaper

Dr. Nicole Flynn

MWF 11:00 - 11:50 am 

Newspapers are a source of information and opinions, a compilation of texts and images that connect individuals within a community, a kind of written public square. They have the potential to empower members of the public by providing access to events and ideas, revealing hidden narratives, making connections, and offering explanations and perspectives on complex problems. Living Newspaper theatre embodies these ideals—literally and metaphorically. It replaces text with actors who speak directly to members of the community, sharing ideas, information, and opinions in order to build connections across different facets of society. In this class, we will write and perform a living newspaper. In preparation, we will keep up with current events in various newspapers, read, respond to editorials, and learn and practice techniques for collecting and engaging with oral history. Building on what you learned in Composition I, this course will help you continue to develop your skills as critical thinkers, readers, and writers. You will practice different types of writing and research in order to cultivate your ability to communicate your ideas in writing, skills that will serve you well throughout your life—academic, professional, and personal. Your culminating performance will provide a unique forum for communicating what you know and believe.

Required Texts

  • They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, Edited by Gerald Graff & Cathy Birkenstein
  • The St. Martin’s Handbook, 9th SDSU edition,Edited by Andrea Lunsford
  • A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

 

ENGL 201.S21 NRM (Natural Resource Management majors only) 

April Myrick

T,Th 9:30-10:45am 

This course builds upon the reading and writing competencies you acquired in English 101 by furthering your ability to conduct research, structure an argument, employ the major elements of writing, and make rhetorical choices for a variety of writing scenarios. Through reading selections, class discussion, research, and reflection, you will learn to pose and investigate a problem, support your ideas with textual evidence, use story craft and voice to promote a perspective or value, and identify and explain your own ethics in relation to the land, its people, and its natural resources. Topics for reading selections and essays include sustainability (with the 3 pillars of social, environmental, and economic), climate change, science literacy and the public, people and land, land ethic, and others. Essay types include argumentation, narrative, and exposition. You will leave the course with a deepened understanding of critical thinking, information literacy, and the rhetorical choices you will make as a writer in your future academic, personal, and professional writing. 

 

ENGL 210.ST1 Introduction to Literature

Dr. M. Nagy

Online

Readings in fiction, drama, and poetry to acquaint students with literature and aesthetic form. Prerequisites: ENGL 101. Notes: Course meets SGR #4 or IGR #3.

 

ENGL 222.S01 British Literature II

Dr. Katherine Malone

MWF 8:00-8:50am

This survey of British literature will introduce you to key authors, texts, genres, and debates from the late eighteenth century to the present. We’ll discuss literary works in the context of cultural forces, including war, industrialization, empire, democracy, individualism, and changing attitudes about race, class, and gender. As we make our way through the Romantic, Victorian, modern, and postmodern eras, we will read writers’ manifestos and literary criticism to consider how the role of the artist and the purpose of art have been defined over two tumultuous centuries. Our class meetings will consist of lecture, discussion, and student presentations. Our assignments—exams, essays, and a final creative project—will help you develop critical reading and writing skills and enhance your appreciation of the history and functions of literature.

 

ENGL 240.ST1: Juvenile Literature (Young Adult)

Jenny Kluck

Online

This course will focus on children’s literature from birth through 5th grade. In addition to studying the history of children’s literature, students will learn about and read various genres of children’s literature, such as picture books, fairy tales, historical fiction, and realistic fiction. We will spend most of our class time discussing the assigned literature and corresponding textbook chapters.  

 

ENGL 240.ST2 Juvenile Literature (Elementary-5th Grade)

April Myrick

Online

A survey of the history of literature written for children and adolescents, and a consideration of the various types of juvenile literature. Notes: Course meets SGR #4.

 

ENGL 242.S01 American Literature II

Dr. Paul Baggett

Tu Th 2:00-3:15pm 

This course surveys a range of U.S. literatures from about 1865 to the present, writings that treat the end of slavery and the development of a segregated America, increasingly urbanized and industrialized U.S. landscapes, waves of immigration, and the fulfilled promise of “America” as imperial nation. The class will explore the diversity of identities represented during that time, and the problems/potentials writers imagined in response to the century’s changes—especially literature’s critical power in a time of nation-building. Required texts for the course are The Norton Anthology of American Literature: 1865 to the Present, Shorter Ninth Edition and Jesmyn Ward’s, Sing Unburied Sing: A Novel.

 

ENGL 250.S01: Science Fiction

Prof. Steven Wingate

MWF 2:00-2:50

In the 20th century, science fiction emerged from a fringe genre that wasn’t taken seriously—and in fact often lumped with comic books—to one that has produced some of our most ambitious fiction and film. This course will examine the genre’s history and present day both in print and on screen, examining such authors as Isaac Asimov and Phillip K. Dick, along with films derived from their work. This course fulfills SGR 4. Suitable for non-majors who want an introduction on how to read, understand, and enjoy literature or majors interested in the topic. This is not a writing-intensive or discussion-based course; course work will include reading quizzes, exams, and some informal or in-class writing.

 

English 283.S01: Introduction to Creative Writing

Dr. Christine Stewart

MWF 1:00-1:50

In this class, students draw inspiration from art for their poems, stories, and creative nonfiction pieces; they also conduct research and draw upon discovered evidence to integrate into their work. Research into art can include the various kinds of art but needs to be more specific: a specific piece of art or art exhibit; a particular artist; art history/movements; a particular kind of artistic process, an issue related to the art world.

  • Work of the course: Three portfolios that break down along the following lines: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.
  • Instructional Method: Blend of lecture, discussion, and small-group peer response.
  • Assessment: Research and writing process as well as engagement with craft (portfolios).
  • Required textbook: David Starkey’s Four Genres in Brief

 

ENGL 284.01: Introduction to Criticism

Dr. Nicole Flynn

MWF 9:00 - 9:50am 

Focusing on literary and cultural theory, this course builds upon ENGL 101 by developing students’ critical reading and writing skills and enhancing their research experience. By examining the theoretical and critical approaches that have shaped English studies, students familiarize themselves with the history of the discipline and the ways it has changed over time. This introduction not only helps students hone their interpretive and analytical skills but also raises questions about how our ways of reading are shaped by our beliefs about what matters most in the world. Students will survey approaches to literary studies that defined the Classical era, Middle Ages, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and nineteenth century, and they will engage deeply with significant critical theories from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, Marxism, historicism, psychoanalysis, feminism, gender studies, queer theory, race theory, ethnic studies, and postcolonial theory. In addition to reading about these theoretical approaches, students study a selection of primary texts by key theorists and apply these ideas in class discussions, exams, and writing assignments, including a research paper.

Required Texts

  • Literary Theory and Criticism: An Introduction by Anne H. Stevens (ISBN: 978-1-554812-37-0)
  • Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction by Jonathan Culler (ISBN: 978-0-199691-34-0)
  • A Passage to India by E.M. Forster, Norton Critical Edition (ISBN:0393655989)
  • 300-level

 

ENGL 330.S01: Shakespeare’s Plays on the Page, the Stage, and the Screen

Dr. Sharon Smith

Tu Th 12:30-1:45pm

According to Sir Ian McKellan, Shakespeare’s plays “were written to be spoken out loud and acted and for us as an audience to watch.” In this course, we will engage in close readings of a number of Shakespeare’s plays; however, we will also explore the significance of performance when engaging with Shakespeare’s work. We will watch both stage and screen performances of the plays we read, sometimes in full and sometimes in part, and we will approach these performances as adaptations and interpretations of the written texts, analyzing how elements such as acting, costuming, setting, scenery, sound, and cinematography shape our encounters with the plays and contribute to our understanding of their meanings. The plays chosen for the course engage in significant ways with questions of gender, sexuality, race, power, colonization, and empire, and these questions will structure our discussions throughout the semester. Plays will likely include The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and The Tempest.

 

ENGL 379.S06 (for Dept. of Biology and Microbiology Majors only) 

Lisa Madsen 

Tu Th 8-9:15am 

This section of English 379 is the second of a sequence (following BIOL490) for Biology and Microbiology majors. In this course, you will:   

  1. Learn and apply the discourse conventions for scientific communication: how to make the right rhetorical choices—from individual words and visual information to structure, format, audience, and medium requirements for the entire communication product.
  2. Improve your information and career literacy via discipline-based scholarly and professional consortia research. 
  3. Disseminate your capstone project by presenting your capstone communication product(s) to a university audience. 

The course structure features two units: First, you will create job- or program-seeking documents featuring the resume. Then, you will follow a multi-step process of researching, analyzing, and communicating your capstone project (BIOL490 original research project or pandemic-related alternative project) to various audiences and via a number of genres, mediums, and platforms such as the scholarly journal article, traditional presentation, informative poster, and multimedia. Scholarly journal article types include the original research article, the original survey, and the literature review. 

 

ENGL 379.ST6 Technical Communication: Biology & Microbiology Majors 

April Myrick

Online

This section of English 379 is the second of a sequence for Biology and Microbiology students. In this course, students will draft and polish job- or program-seeking documents including a resume. Students will improve their information literacy via discipline-based research. Students will also devote a significant portion of the semester to analyzing and organizing their BIOL490 research for writing and presentation via a number of platforms and mediums (such as scholarly journal article, traditional presentation, informative poster, and multimedia) and for both technical and lay audiences. 

 

English 383.01: Creative Writing I

Dr. Christine Stewart

MWF 2:00-2:50

Dr. Stewart’s Creative Writing I, or “The World of the Real Writer,” focuses on strengthening poetry, creative nonfiction, and/or fiction writing skills by developing longer/more complex projects. Through the processes of writing and revising creative texts, the class helps students learn more craft concepts and develop more sophisticated applications for them. Large-group workshop sessions will challenge students to expand and strengthen their practice of peer response. Students will also self-select texts to read as a writer and use to contextualize their creative work. Finally, reading submissions for a state-wide poetry and prose contest will give them real-world editing experience.

ENGL 383 differs from ENGL 283 in that it does not fulfill an IGR or SGR credit. Because it primarily draws majors from English and affiliated fields, it focuses on the relationship between creative work and the study of literature. While research-based projects are welcome, they are not required.

Required texts:

  • Sellers, Heather. The Practice of Creative Writing
  • One contemporary mentor text of the student’s choice.
  • Student work
  • 400-level

ENGL 491.S01: Undergraduate Peer Tutoring

Dr. Nathan Serfling

Independent Study

Since their beginnings in the 1920s and 30s, writing centers have come to serve a number of functions: as hubs for writing across the curriculum initiatives, sites to develop and deliver workshops, and resource centers for faculty as well as students, among other functions. But the primary function of writing centers has necessarily and rightfully remained the tutoring of student writers. This course will immerse you in that function in two parts. During the first four weeks, you will explore writing center praxis -- that is, the dialogic interplay of theory and practice related to writing center work. This part of the course will orient you to writing center history, key theoretical tenets, and practical aspects of writing center tutoring. Once we have developed and practiced this foundation, you will begin work in the writing center as tutors, responsible for assisting a wide variety of student clients with numerous writing tasks. Through this work, you will learn to actively engage with student clients in the revision of a text, respond to different student needs and abilities, work with a variety of writing tasks and rhetorical situations, and develop a richer sense of writing as a complex and negotiated social process. Prerequisites: Students wishing to enroll in this course must be of junior or senior standing and needs to provide the name of an English and Interdisciplinary Studies department faculty member who will serve as a reference for them.

 

ENGL 491.01: Literary Publishing Practicum

Prof. Steven Wingate  

Independent Study

A hands-on, semester long introduction to literary publishing centered on, but not limited to, the production of SDSU's literary journal Oakwood, founded in 1976. Our work will involve soliciting, editing, producing, and promoting the magazine, as well as an overview of the publishing industry and an opportunity to craft a publishing resume.  This class will give you demonstrable experience with workplace practices applicable in fields from editing to corporate communications. It will be conducted as an independent study course, though we will arrange for common meeting times both online and in person based on the schedules of those involved.

 

English 492: Writing Poetry: Form & Format

Dr. Christine Stewart

Wednesdays 6:00-8:50pm

This course foregrounds student experimentation with patterns that build poems, in particular, form. Not only will students become familiar with traditional received forms and stanza structures, they will also learn about (and apply the constraints) of contemporary forms. Throughout the semester, large-group response workshops will give students experience sharpening their peer feedback skills. Students will also deepen their revision skills by iterating drafts to create exceptional poems, culminating in the design and execution of a format (a chapbook).

Prerequisites: English 283 and/or English 383.

Texts:

__________________________________________________

GRADUATE COURSES

 

English 592: Writing Poetry: Form & Format

Dr. Christine Stewart

Wednesdays 6:00-8:50pm

This course foregrounds student experimentation with patterns that build poems, in particular, form. Not only will students become familiar with traditional received forms and stanza structures, they will also learn about (and apply the constraints) of contemporary forms. Throughout the semester, large-group response workshops will give students experience sharpening their peer feedback skills. Students will also deepen their revision skills by iterating drafts to create exceptional poems, culminating in the design and execution of a format (a chapbook).

Graduate students will work alongside undergraduates in this course but with the expectations of more sophisticated, polished work. Furthermore, graduate students will review a chapbook of poetry outside of those read by the whole class, turn in a formal review, and present that review in-class.

Prerequisites:  Graduate students without prior creative writing experience need to contact Dr. Stewart before enrolling.

Texts:

  • An Exaltation of Forms: Contemporary Poets Celebrate the Diversity of Their Art by Annie Ridley Crane Finch (Author), Kathrine Lore Varnes (Author)
  • Four chapbooks, titles To Be Announced
  • Student work

 

ENGL 704.01: Introduction to Graduate Studies

Dr. Paul Baggett

W 3:00-5:50pm

Introduction to Graduate Studies is required of all first-year graduate students. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to modern and contemporary literary theory and its applications. Students will write short response papers and will engage at least one theoretical approach in their own fifteen- to twenty-page scholarly research project. In addition, this course will further introduce students to the M.A. program in English at South Dakota State University and provide insight into issues related to the profession of English studies.

 

ENGL 729: Seminar in American Literature Since 1900: The Vietnam War in Literature and Film

Dr. Jason McEntee

Tuesdays 3-5:50pm

In this course, we will consider how literature and film attempt to chronicle the Vietnam War. We will draw from Dispatches, A Rumor of War, The Things They Carried, A Piece of My Heart, and Bloods as well as selections from The Vietnam Reader.  There will be brief assigned readings for consideration in the context of the movies—selections from the Iliad and William James's "The Moral Equivalent of War," for example.  Some of the movies that we will study include Apocalypse Now (the original version), Full Metal Jacket, Platoon, Coming Home, Born on the Fourth of July, Dead Presidents, and Hearts and Minds.  Because we must do so, we will also look at some of the more fascinatingly outrageous yet culturally significant fantasies about the war, such as The Green Berets and Rambo: First Blood, Part II. This course will not encourage militaristic, pro-war sentiment or, conversely, pacifistic, anti-war sentiment: We will at all times study these narratives as literary critics.

 

ENGL 791.01: Literary Publishing Practicum

Prof. Steven Wingate  

Independent Study

A hands-on, semester long introduction to literary publishing centered on, but not limited to, the production of SDSU's literary journal Oakwood, founded in 1976. Our work will involve soliciting, editing, producing, and promoting the magazine, as well as an overview of the publishing industry and an opportunity to craft a publishing resume.  This class will give you demonstrable experience with workplace practices applicable in fields from editing to corporate communications. It will be conducted as an independent study course, though we will arrange for common meeting times both in person and online based on the schedules of those involved. Please note that both in-person and online M.A. students can enroll in this course.

Graduate courses will work side-by-side with undergraduates enrolled in ENGL 491 but with a different grading rubric and set of responsibilities, including an oral presentation and a written research report on a publishing topic developed by the student

 

ENGL 792.01: Remembering The Great War

Dr. Nicole Flynn

Online Asynchronous

The Great War. World War I. The War to End all Wars. 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the conclusion of this epic conflict. This war ended the carefree Edwardian era and ushered in the violent birth of modernity. It left no part of British culture and society untouched—gender roles, the economy, technology, medicine, family structure to name a few—and it redrew the map of the world. Although we will anchor our examination in Britain’s experience of the war, our scope will inevitably extend in every direction across the globe. We will examine texts that represent this multifarious global event: canonical and neglected texts; written, visual, and dramatic; fiction and nonfiction; experimental and traditional; texts composed before, during, and after the war; texts about the battlefield and the home front. Furthermore, we will interrogate the way it has been remembered and how texts represent the concept of war.