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2021 Fall Semester

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

Composition courses that offer many sections (ENGL 101, 201, 277 and 279) are not listed on this schedule unless they are tailored to specific thematic content or particularly appropriate for specific programs and majors.

  • 100-200 level

English 151.S01 Introduction to English Studies 

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. 

Dr. Sharon Smith 

English 151 serves as an introduction to both the English major and the discipline of English studies. In this class, you will develop the thinking, reading, writing and research practices that define both the major and the discipline. Much of the semester will be devoted to honing your literary analysis skills, and we will study and discuss texts from several different genres—poetry, short fiction, the novel, drama and film—as well as some literary criticism. As we do so, we will explore the language of the discipline, and you will learn a variety of key literary terms and concepts. In addition, you will develop your skills as both a writer and researcher within the discipline of English. 

ENGL 201.05 Composition II: The Living Newspaper

Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

Dr. Nicole Flynn

Newspapers are a source of information and opinions, a compilation of texts and images that connect individuals within a community, a kind of written public square. They have the potential to empower members of the public by providing access to events and ideas, revealing hidden narratives, making connections and offering explanations and perspectives on complex problems. Living Newspaper theatre embodies these ideals—literally and metaphorically. It replaces text with actors who speak directly to members of the community, sharing ideas, information and opinions in order to build connections across different facets of society. In this class, we will write and perform a living newspaper. In preparation, we will keep up with current events in various newspapers, read, respond to editorials and learn and practice techniques for collecting and engaging with oral history. Building on what you learned in Composition I, this course will help you continue to develop your skills as critical thinkers, readers and writers. You will practice different types of writing and research in order to cultivate your ability to communicate your ideas in writing, skills that will serve you well throughout your life—academic, professional and personal. Your culminating performance will provide a unique forum for communicating what you know and believe. 

Required Texts

  • They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, 5th edition, Edited by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein
  • The St. Martin’s Handbook, 9th SDSU edition, Edited by Andrea Lunsford
  • A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry

ENGL 201.S11 Composition with an emphasis in Environmental Writing 

Monday/Wednesday/Friday 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Gwen Horsley

English 201 will help students develop the ability to think critically and analytically and to write effectively for other university courses and careers. This course will provide opportunities to develop analytical skills that will help students become critical readers and effective writers. Specifically, in this class, students will (1) focus on the relationships between world environments, land, animals and humankind; (2) read various essays by environmental, conservational and regional authors; and (3) produce student writings. Students will improve their writing skills by reading essays and applying techniques they witness in others’ work and those learned in class. This class is also a course in logical and creative thought. Students will write about man’s place in the world and our influence on the land and animals, places that hold special meaning to them or have influenced their lives and stories of their own families and their places and passions in the world. Students will practice writing in an informed and persuasive manner, in language that engages and enlivens readers by using vivid verbs and avoiding unnecessary passives, nominalizations and expletive constructions.  

Students will prepare writing assignments based on readings and discussions of essays included in Literature and the Environment and other sources. They will use The St. Martin’s Handbook to review grammar, punctuation, mechanics and usage as needed. 

ENGL 201.S12 (Honors) Composition II: Writing at the Intersection of Art and Research

Monday/Wednesday/Friday 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Dr. Christine Stewart

In this class, students will choose an artwork from the South Dakota Art Museum as the touchstone for all their writing projects. The four projects require different kinds of research and source material from which to build compositions: observation, interviews, newspapers/ magazines, dictionaries/encyclopedias, etc. Evidence may also be found in physical archives, digital archives, interviews and via general internet research. To be an effective writer in this class, student must cultivate curiosity about art as well as an openness to inquiry and discovery.

  • Work of the course: Four projects that break down along the following lines: Analyzing Art; Profiling Art/Artist; Arguing Art, and Ekphrasis.
  • Instructional Method: Blend of lecture, discussion and small-group peer response.
  • Assessment: Four writing projects, reading responses, participation.
  • Required textbook: The most recent addition of the St. Martin’s Handbook and other assigned readings provided through free, online sources.

ENGL 201.S15 Composition II for NRM (Natural Resource Management majors only)

Tuesday/Thursday 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Lisa Madsen

This course builds upon the reading and writing competencies you acquired in English 101 by furthering your ability to conduct research, structure an argument, employ the major elements of writing and make rhetorical choices for a variety of writing scenarios. Through reading selections, class discussion, research and reflection, you will learn to pose and investigate a problem, support your ideas with textual evidence, use story craft and voice to promote a perspective or value and identify and explain your own ethics in relation to the land, its people and its natural resources. Topics for reading selections and essays include sustainability (with the 3 pillars of social, environmental, and economic), climate change, science literacy and the public, people and land, land ethic and others. Essay types include argumentation, narrative and exposition. You will leave the course with a deepened understanding of critical thinking, information literacy and the rhetorical choices you will make as a writer in your future academic, personal and professional writing.

English 201.S18: Composition II: The Mind/Body Connection

Tuesday/Thursday, 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Dr. Sharon Smith

In this section of English 201, students will use research and writing to learn more about problems that are important to them and articulate ways to address those problems. The course will focus specifically on issues related to the body, the mind and the relationship between them. The topics we will discuss during the course will include the correlation between social media and body image; the effects of sports-related concussions; the efficacy of sex education programs; the degree to which beliefs about race and gender influence school dress codes and the unique mental and physical challenges faced by college students today. In this course, you will be learning about different approaches to argumentation, analyzing the arguments of others and constructing your own arguments. At the same time, you will be honing your skills as a researcher and developing your abilities as a persuasive and effective writer. 

English 201.ST1: Composition II: The Mind/Body Connection

ONLINE

Dr. Sharon Smith 

In this section of English 201, students will use research and writing to learn more about problems that are important to them and articulate ways to address those problems. The course will focus specifically on issues related to the body, the mind, and the relationship between them. The topics we will discuss during the course will include the correlation between social media and body image; the effects of sports-related concussions; the efficacy of sex education programs; the degree to which beliefs about race and gender influence school dress codes and the unique mental and physical challenges faced by college students today. In this course, you will be learning about different approaches to argumentation, analyzing the arguments of others and constructing your own arguments. At the same time, you will be honing your skills as a researcher and developing your abilities as a persuasive and effective writer

ENGL 221.S01 British Literature I

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Dr. M. Nagy

English 221 is a survey of early British literature from its inception in the Old English period with works such as Beowulf and the “Battle of Maldon,” through the Middle Ages and the incomparable writings of Geoffrey Chaucer and the Gawain-poet, to the Renaissance and beyond. Students will explore the historical and cultural contexts in which all assigned reading materials were written, and they will be expected to bring that information to bear on class discussion. Likely themes that this class will cover include heroism, humor, honor, religion, heresy and moral relativity.

Students will write one research paper in this class and sit for two formal exams: a midterm covering everything up to that point in the semester, and a comprehensive final. Probable texts include the following:

  • The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Middle Ages. Ed.  Alfred David, M. H. Abrams, and Stephen Greenblatt. 9th ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.
  • The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Sixteenth Century and Early Seventeenth Century. Ed. George M. Logan, Stephen Greenblatt, Barbara K Lewalski, and M. H. Abrams. 9th ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.
  • The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century. Ed. George M. Logan, Stephen Greenblatt, Barbara K Lewalski, and M. H. Abrams. 9th ed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.
  • Gibaldi, Joseph. The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 6th ed. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 2003.
  • Any Standard College Dictionary.

ENGL 240.S01 Elementary-5th Grade 

Monday/Wednesday/Friday Noon - 12:50 p.m.

Jennifer Kluck

This course will focus on children’s literature from birth through 5th grade. In addition to studying the history of children’s literature, students will learn about and read various genres of children’s literature, such as picture books, fairy tales, historical fiction and realistic fiction. We will spend most of our class time discussing the assigned literature and corresponding textbook chapters.  

ENGL 240.ST1 Juvenile Literature: Elementary-5th Grade 

ONLINE 

Randi L. Anderson

In English 240 students will develop the skills to interpret and evaluate various genres of literature for juvenile readers. This particular section will focus on various works of literature at approximately the K-5 grade level. We will read a large range of works that fall into this category, as well as information on the history, development and genre of juvenile literature.

Readings for this course include classical works such as Hatchet, Little Women, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and Brown Girl Dreaming, as well as newer works like Strom in the Barn, Anne Frank’s Diary: A Graphic Adaptation, Lumberjanes, and a variety of picture books. These readings will be paired with chapters from Reading Children’s Literature: A Critical Introduction to help develop understanding of various genres, themes, and concepts that are both related to juvenile literature, and also present in our readings.

In addition to exposing students to various genres of writing (poetry, historical fiction, non-fiction, fantasy, picture books, graphic novels, etc.) this course will also allow students to engage in a discussion of larger themes present in these works such as censorship, race, and gender.

Students’ understanding of these works and concepts will be developed through readings, research, discussion posts, exams, and writing assignments designed to get students to practice analyzing poetry, picture books, informational books, and transitional/easy readers.

ENGL 241.S01 American Literature I

Tuesday/Thursday 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

Dr. Jason McEntee

Catalog description: Background to and survey of major works from the beginnings to the Civil War. ENGL 241 and 242 need not be taken in sequence.

This course provides a broad, historical survey of American literature from the early colonial period to the Civil War. Ranging across historical periods and literary genres—including early accounts of contact and discovery, narratives of captivity and slavery, poetry of revolution, essays on gender equality, and stories of industrial exploitation—this class examines how subjects such as colonialism, nationhood, religion, slavery, westward expansion, race, gender, and democracy continue to influence how Americans see themselves and their society.

Required texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature: Volumes A (Beginnings to 1820) and B (1820 to 1865), Ninth Edition. ISBNs 978-0-393-93571-4 and 978-0-393-26447-0

ENGL 248.S01 (also Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies 248.01) Women in Literature: Poetry of Sex and Desire

Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

Dr. Christine Stewart

In this class, students will read poetry, feminist and queer theory, as well as writings that contextualize our inquiry. We will study the poetry of women (and people who identify as genderqueer) and pose the following questions:

  • Why poetry? What makes the genre fertile ground for the exploration of desire?
  • Why sex? How have historical social norms shaped the way women write about their bodies and their desires? What taboos have been addressed and which remain? Why?
  • What/who do women desire? What other aspects of life overlap with desire?
  • Work of the course: Close reading, analysis, synthesis
  • Instructional Method: Lecture
  • Assessment: Four essay exams and one presentation.
  • Required textbooks: Three contemporary collections of poetry (total price: <$60). Other materials offered via free, online resources.

ENGL 283.S01 Introduction to Creative Writing

Monday/Wednesday/Friday 1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.

Dr. Christine Stewart

In this class, students draw inspiration from art for their poems, stories and creative nonfiction pieces; they also conduct research and draw upon discovered evidence to integrate into their work. Research into art can include the various kinds of art but needs to be more specific: a specific piece of art or art exhibit; a particular artist; art history/movements; a particular kind of artistic process, an issue related to the art world.

  • Work of the course: Three portfolios that break down along the following lines: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction.
  • Instructional Method: Blend of lecture, discussion, and small-group peer response.
  • Assessment: Research and writing process as well as engagement with craft (portfolios).
  • Required textbook: David Starkey’s Four Genres in Brief
  • 300-level

ENGL 379 Technical Communication: Biology and Microbiology Majors

Tuesday/Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

Lisa Madsen (Section 05), April Myrick (Section 06)

This section of English 379 is the second of a sequence for Biology and Microbiology students. In this course, students will draft and polish job- or program-seeking documents including a resume. Students will improve their information literacy via discipline-based research. Students will also devote a significant portion of the semester to analyzing and organizing their BIOL490 research for writing and presentation via a number of platforms and mediums (such as scholarly journal article, traditional presentation, informative poster, and multimedia) and for both technical and lay audiences. 

ENGL 379.ST2 Technical Communication for NRM (Natural Resource Management majors only)

ONLINE

Lisa Madsen

This course features the major elements of technical communication along with methods of critical thinking, collaboration, project-based learning, ethics, and information literacy. Coursework includes refining one’s resume, building information literacy skills specific to NRM, and reporting on current, real-world topics within ecology, conservation, land and resource management, plant and animal science, and technology within NRM. You will learn about discourse conventions—expectations for communicating within NRM research, scholarship, and its professions. You will also learn about current trends in NRM communication. Such conventions and trends include the following:

  • the growing demand for communication skills in NRM jobs.
  • the use of appropriate and distinct communication strategies for various audiences (internal versus external and technical versus non-technical), including members of the public, landowners, stakeholders, scientists, and government and agency officials such as conservation officers.
  • the use of terminology to present, for example, the ever-changing science of climate or the values driving modern sustainability practices.
  • understanding and creating content for visual, verbal, and mixed mediums in order to meet audience expectations.
  • platforms such as social, citizen science, agency, and governmental.
  • communication challenges such as the increasing politicization of NRM, conflicting interests in resource management, the current cultural embrace of ideology over science, and social media’s magnification of these issues.

You will leave the course with the ability to apply the major elements of technical communication to all manner of rhetorical scenarios in future academic and workplace communication tasks.

  • 400-level

ENGL 479.S01 Literature and Human Rights (Capstone Course)

Tuesday 3:00 p.m. - 5:50 p.m.

Dr. Paul Baggett

This course invites students to participate in a rigorous cultural study of human rights, with a particular focus on the relationship between literature and human rights. The nature of this relationship is more complicated than one might assume. As literary scholar Crystal Parikh observes, literature’s relationship to human rights “is never simply one of ‘humanizing’ others nor of ‘raising awareness’ by representing violations of human rights.” While humanizing and raising awareness are certainly worthy goals, this course attends to less commonly recognized aspects of that relationship. We will consider, for instance, how literature shapes our understanding of what exactly those rights are, reveals to whom those rights are distributed in contexts around the world, and critiques the ideologies that govern human rights discourses and human rights politics. In addition to literature, our study will consider cinematic, historical, and theoretical works. Our primary texts are set in four different continents, and address a range of issues, including colonialism, slavery, refugee abuse, genocide, war, and even the rights of nonhuman subjects.

Possible texts include Hunt’s Inventing Human Rights, Gates, Classic Slave Narratives, Delbo’s Auschwitz and After, Shamsie’s Home Fire, Luiselli’s Lost Children Archive, Hamid’s Exit West, Erdrich’s The Round House, Eggers’ The Parade, Sacks’s City of a Thousand Gates, Sacco’s Safe Area Gorazde, Coetzee’s The Lives of Animals, Oppenheimer’s documentary The Act of Killing, and critical essays by Arendt, Slaughter, Huyssen, Ngyuen, Maxwell, Tickten, Rothberg, Smith, and Haraway.

ENGL 491.S01 Undergraduate Peer Tutoring

Independent Study

Dr. Nathan Serfling

Since their beginnings in the 1920s and 30s, writing centers have come to serve a number of functions: as hubs for writing across the curriculum initiatives, sites to develop and deliver workshops, and resource centers for faculty as well as students, among other functions. But the primary function of writing centers has necessarily and rightfully remained the tutoring of student writers. This course will immerse you in that function in two parts. During the first four weeks, you will explore writing center praxis -- that is, the dialogic interplay of theory and practice related to writing center work. This part of the course will orient you to writing center history, key theoretical tenets and practical aspects of writing center tutoring. Once we have developed and practiced this foundation, you will begin work in the writing center as tutors, responsible for assisting a wide variety of student clients with numerous writing tasks. Through this work, you will learn to actively engage with student clients in the revision of a text, respond to different student needs and abilities, work with a variety of writing tasks and rhetorical situations and develop a richer sense of writing as a complex and negotiated social process. Prerequisites: Students wishing to enroll in this course must be of junior or senior standing and needs to provide the name of an English and Interdisciplinary Studies department faculty member who will serve as a reference for them.

ENGL 492.S01 Screenwriting

ONLINE

Prof. Steven Wingate

In this course you will learn the fundamentals of screenwriting: good format, believable and imaginative stories, solid characterization and well-turned narrative arcs. You will read outstanding, award-winning screenplays (Birdman and Arrival) as craft examples, adapt a literary work to learn format, then draft, workshop, revise and expand original scripts or adaptations. At the end of the course, you will have either a complete and polished first act of a feature script you can complete on your own time, or a fully-realized script for a short film or series episode.


GRADUATE COURSES

ON CAMPUS

ENGL 705.S01 Seminar in Teaching Composition

Thursday 1 p.m. - 3:50 p.m.

Dr. Nathan Serfling

This course will provide you with a foundation in the pedagogies and theories (and their attendant histories) of writing instruction, a foundation that will prepare you to teach your own writing courses at SDSU and elsewhere. As you will discover through the course, though, writing instruction does not come with any prescribed set of “best” practices. Rather, writing pedagogies stem from and continue to evolve because of a variety of (largely unsettled) debates. Part of becoming a practicing writing instructor, then, is studying these debates to develop a sense of what “effective writing instruction” might mean for you in our particular program and how you might adapt that understanding to different programs and contexts.

As we read about, discuss, and research these debates and their implications for the teaching of writing, we will address a variety of practical and theoretical topics. The practical focus will allow us to attend to topics relevant to your immediate classroom practices: designing a curriculum and various types of assignments, assessing student work, and delivering the course content, among others. Our theoretical topics will begin to reveal the underpinnings of these various practical matters, including their historical, rhetorical, social and political contexts. In other words, we will investigate the praxis—the dialogic interactions of practice and theory—of writing pedagogy. As a result, this course aims to prepare you not only as a writing teacher but also as a nascent writing pedagogy scholar.

ENGL 726.S01 English Literature Since 1660

A Dramatic Century: Modern British Theatre from 1890-1995

Wednesday 3 p.m. - 5:50 p.m.

Dr. Nicole Flynn

The twentieth century was a transformative time for theatre in England. This course will introduce and explore key dramatists, shifts in style and content and their historical contexts. According to theatre scholar Christopher Innes, “the beginning of modern drama in England can be dated in 1890 when Bernard Shaw gave his lecture on ‘The Quintessence of Ibsenism,’ which marks a watershed between traditionalism and new politicized forms of drama (3). We will begin, then, with Shaw and progress chronologically through the century, exploring the theatrical traditions and styles that emerged and developed during this period. In addition, we will practice ways of thinking about, responding to, and writing about theatre—in text and in performance.

Required Texts

  • Modern British Drama: The Twentieth Century (ISBN: 9780521016759) by Christopher Innes
  • The Plays of George Bernard Shaw (ISBN: 9780393977530) by George Bernard Shaw
  • Blithe Spirit, Hay Fever, Private Lives: Three Plays (ISBN: 9780679781790) by Noel Coward
  • Waiting for Godot (ISBN: 9780802144423) by Samuel Beckett
  • Look Back in Anger (ISBN: 9780140481754) by John Osborne
  • The Homecoming (ISBN: 9780802151056) by Harold Pinter
  • Cloud Nine (ISBN: 9781559360999) by Caryl Churchill
  • The Real Thing (ISBN: 9780571125296) by Tom Stoppard
  • Blasted (ISBN: 9780413766205) by Sarah Kane

ONLINE

ENGL 592.S01: Topics

Screenwriting

Prof. Steven Wingate

In this course you will learn the fundamentals of screenwriting: good format, believable and imaginative stories, solid characterization, and well-turned narrative arcs. You will read outstanding, award-winning screenplays (Birdman and Arrival) as craft examples, adapt a literary work to learn format, then draft, workshop, revise and expand original scripts or adaptations. At the end of the course, you will have either a complete and polished first act of a feature script you can complete on your own time, or a fully-realized script for a short film or series episode.

    ENGL 792.ST2: Topics: Literature

    The Victorian Supernatural

    Dr. Katherine Malone

    This course explores the nineteenth-century fascination with the supernatural: ghosts, clairvoyants, vampires, werewolves and other invisible and unexplained forces. We will read works of mystery, fantasy, and horror by authors such as Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Margaret Oliphant, George Eliot, Henry James, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Machen and others. We will analyze this exciting reading material through a range of critical lenses and within the historical context of imperialism, scientific innovation, the growth of the periodical press and discourse about race, class and gender. In addition to writing an argumentative research paper, students will explore critical approaches to the genre, lead discussion, and gain expertise in pedagogy and textual production by creating a digital anthology of nineteenth-century texts with critical apparatus.