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Research - Biology and Microbiology Department

Improved regulation of transpiration through stomatal pore size and aperture would improve yields in severe environments.
Improved regulation of transpiration through stomatal pore size and aperture would improve yields in severe environments.

The Biology and Microbiology Department provides an intellectually vibrant, collegial and interdisciplinary research environment. Here students and faculty seek to further our understanding of biological systems and processes, and contribute to solutions for the challenges facing humankind. Research is focused in seven areas, and faculty work on a range of life forms including mammals, plants, fungi, bacteria and viruses. Research in the various laboratories is supported through grants from various funding agencies, including NSF, NIH, and USDA, shared departmental equipment, and three core facilities - Functional Genomics Core facility, Genomics Sequencing Facility and Mass Spec Facility. Our graduates find positions in academia, medicine, veterinary and medical research & biotech industry.

Systems Biology Immunology and Microbiology Mammalian Cell & Molecular Biology Biotechnology and Synthetic Biology Plant and Animal Microbiomes Plant Cell & Molecular Biology Discipline-based Education

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genetic evidence of molecular interactions in images

New instrument to help scientists examine molecular interactions

Understanding the interactions among DNA, proteins and other molecules will help scientists improve human and animal health and increase the sustainability of agriculture.

Compounds from soybeans may improve animal health

Antimicrobial compounds that soybean plants produce when threatened by insects, diseases and even drought may help animals stay healthy, thereby reducing the need for antibiotics.

NIH grant helps unravel rare inflammatory genetic disorders

Assistant professor Jaime Lopez is investigating an enzyme called linear ubiquitin assembly complex, or LUBAC, that plays a central role in regulating cell death through a five-year, nearly $1.3 million National Institutes of Health RO1 grant.