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Smithsonian Institution exhibition "IndiVisible" explores dual ancestry

"IndiVisible" examines the dual heritage of people who share African American and Native American ancestry.
"IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas," an exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution, is on display at Briggs Library until Feb. 28. A closing reception will be held Feb. 22 at 7 pm at the library.

"Within the fabric of American identity is woven a story that has long been invisible - the lives and experiences of people who share African American and Native American ancestry."

"Within the fabric of American identity is woven a story that has long been invisible - the lives and experiences of people who share African American and Native American ancestry."

So begins the Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas, now on display at Briggs Library.

The exhibit focuses on the seldom-viewed history and complex lives of people of dual African American and Native American ancestry. Through the themes of policy, community, creative resistance and lifestyles, the exhibition tells stories of cultural integration and diffusion as well as the struggle to define and preserve identity.

“The topic of African-Native Americans is one that touches a great number of individuals through family histories, tribal histories and personal identities,” said Kevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian. “We find commonalities in our shared past of genocide, alienation from our ancestral homelands, and the exhibition acknowledges the strength and resilience we recognize in one another today.”

The exhibit remains on view to the public until Feb. 28 as part of its national tour. The closing reception for IndiVisible will be Feb. 22 at 7 pm on the upper level of the library, with remarks from SDSU Tribal Relations Director Richie Meyers at 7:30 pm. An online version of the exhibition is available here.

IndiVisible was produced by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, the National Museum of African-American History and Culture and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES). The exhibition was made possible in part thanks to the generous support of the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center, and anonymous donors.